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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: yale university

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  • Buckley Jr - 2,624 words
    ... alleviate the symptoms of glaucoma; to improve appetite dangerously reduced from AIDS. They use it as an effective medicine, yet they are technically regarded as criminals, and every year many are jailed. Although more than 75 per cent of Americans believe that marijuana should be available legally for medical purposes, the Federal Government refuses to legalize access or even to sponsor research. 2. Drugs are here to stay. The time has come to abandon the concept of a "drug-free society." We need to focus on learning to live with drugs in such a way that they do the least possible harm. So far as I can ascertain, the societies that have proved most successful in minimizing drug-related ...
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  • A Reflection On Paul Hindemith - 1,231 words
    A Reflection On Paul Hindemith Paul Hindemith was revolutionary and a musical genius. Many people who lived around the same time saw him as nothing more than an untalented noisemaker. Granted, these people didnt have all of the various forms of music that we have today, but untalented would not be a word I would use to describe Paul Hindemith. He helped begin the last great change in classical music from the Romantic Era, which was very tonal and diatonic, to 20th Century Modern Music, which is extremely atonal. Diatonic means within in the key. In other words, everything sounds nice and pretty. There are no weird noises, no funny pitches. Atonal itself is defined as the avoidance of the tra ...
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  • Aids Test On Animal - 1,191 words
    Aids Test On Animal Aids Testing on Animals Between 25 and 50 million animals are killed in American laboratories each year, this include mice, rats, cats, ferrets, monkey, and etc.(American Anti-Vivisection Society) Since the medical skill has been developed, numbers of drugs have been invented to fight the diseases that human beings get. In order to make sure that those medicine works, the medicines need to be tested on animals first. When a new disease is found, thousands of animals are put in the laboratory to test on the new medicine. And during the past decade, the new disease, Aids, is found. Is it time again for millions of animals to sacrifice their lives and have no right for their ...
    Related: aids, animal experimentation, animal rights, veterinary medicine, university school
  • Al Gore - 1,488 words
    Al Gore Al Gore Running mate: Sen. Joe Lieberman. Current position: Vice president of the United States Political experience: Vice-President of the United States (1993-present); US senator from Tennessee (1985-1993); candidate for the Democratic nomination for president (1987-1988); US representative from Tennessee, (1977-1985) Work experience: farmer (1973-1990); investigative reporter, editorial writer, The Tennessean (1971-1976); home builder and land developer, Tanglewood Home Builders Co. (1971-1976) Party affiliation: Democrat Educational background: • B.A., Harvard University, 1969; • Vanderbilt University Law School, 1974-76. Military experience: • U.S. Army, 1969-1 ...
    Related: gore, achievement gap, john adams, zero tolerance policy, carolina
  • Apartheid In Africa - 1,534 words
    ... ed by Robert Sobukwe. For the first time, the ANC was challenged as the leading voice against apartheid. On March 21, 1960, Robert Sobukwe initiated widespread anti-pass law demonstrations. People gathered in thousands at the police station where passes were to be destroyed. As the morning wore on, the crowd, which journalists found "perfectly amiable," appeared to the police increasingly menacing (Thompson, 1996, pp. 74-82). In the early afternoon, seventy-five policemen fired some 700 shots into the crowd, killing 69 Africans and wounding 180. Among them were women and children. Most of the dead had been shot in the back. That evening, a thousand miles away, outside Cape Town, the prot ...
    Related: africa, apartheid, south africa, post colonialism, human rights
  • Artificial Intelligence - 1,247 words
    Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence (AI) conjures up visions of robots that can mix dry martinis while beating a grand master at chess; and to some, will one day be able to look, act, think and react just like a real person. I would like to explore the concept of AI as it relates to the business world, and its possible many other applications. I believe that true AI is a dream worth pursuing. Like me, there are many who, just like those of the early 1960's, thought that putting a man on the moon seemed to be an extremely difficult, but not an impossible task, believing the achievement of true AI to come is just a matter of time. To remain competitive, companies must continue to i ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, intelligence, current situation, language learning
  • Ben Carson - 566 words
    Ben Carson Ben Carson In 1951, Benjamin Carson was born to Sonya and Robert Carson. He grew up in Detroit, Michigan. Six years later in 1959, Ben's parents divorced and he, his brother Curtis, and his mother moved to Boston, Massachusetts. They lived there for two years and moved back to Detroit in 1961. Ben Carson wasn't always the smart guy. In fact for a long time he did poorly in school. It wasn't until after Ben failed his eye test in fifth grade that his grades changed. He had very poor eyesight, which was restricting his learning. After Ben began to wear glasses, he gradually began to do better in school. With his mother's help he became the smartest boy in his class. Even though Ben ...
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  • Boethius - 1,879 words
    Boethius Throughout history, every society has searched for some way to express its feelings and beliefs. Music has been an integral part of virtually every culture, so it is quite natural for people to have written about this subject. More literature has survived than actual music, which leaves modern scholars with the job of translating, interpreting, and trying to understand the writings of people prior to modern musical notation. Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius wrote and translated many books on subjects he felt were important to the education of future generations. Of particular interest is his book, The Fundamentals of Music (De institutione musica). Even though this book is no long ...
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  • Braveheart - 963 words
    Braveheart Braveheart Essay written by () This movie is about war between the English and the scotch rebellion people. A scotch brave knight (William Wallace) comes to lead his people of Scotland to victory in a few battles with the English, which makes a threat to the king of England. The English king sends his French daughter in law to negotiate peace with the savage warier. The scene begins as the warier approaches the beautiful princess with worn out clothes. The princess, have a look of anxiety in her eyes as she recognizes Wallace as a savage person. The princess invites Wallace to her tent to discuss the king's proposals of peace. In the tent she describes Wallace's actions of killing ...
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  • Brazilian Economy - 1,016 words
    ... mption, although this will lag behind the other drivers of growth. Industrial production grew in February for the fifth time in seven months, the first time Brazil has posted such a broad expansion since late 1997 (LaitnFocus) Public debt growth accelerated after mid-1995 due to the need to stabilize short-term capital inflows drawn by high domestic interest rates. This policy together with the need to extend central bank credit to the financial sector to help troubled banks has also led to a growing quasi-fiscal deficit. The Real's value has held well below its weakest point early in 1999 (around R2: $1), ending 1999 at R1.79: $1. Although debt repayments are forecast to be higher in th ...
    Related: brazilian, brazilian economy, economy, open economy, world economy
  • Causes Of The Showa Restoration - 1,772 words
    ... liament, transformed this sense of a national crisis into a total shift in foreign policy. These "restorationists" in the military and in the public stepped up the crisis by convincing the nation that there were two enemies, the foreign powers and people within Japan.Footnote33 The militarists identified the Japanese "Bureaucratic Elite" and the expanding merchant class, the "Zaibutsu" as responsible for Japan's loss of grandeur. It was the Bureaucratic Elite who had capitulated to the Western powers in the Washington Conference and in subsequent agreements, that decreased the size of the Japanese military,Footnote34 and made Japan dependent of trade with other nations. The independence ...
    Related: meiji restoration, restoration, princeton university, japanese power, invasion
  • Causes Of The Showa Restoration - 1,772 words
    ... liament, transformed this sense of a national crisis into a total shift in foreign policy. These "restorationists" in the military and in the public stepped up the crisis by convincing the nation that there were two enemies, the foreign powers and people within Japan.Footnote33 The militarists identified the Japanese "Bureaucratic Elite" and the expanding merchant class, the "Zaibutsu" as responsible for Japan's loss of grandeur. It was the Bureaucratic Elite who had capitulated to the Western powers in the Washington Conference and in subsequent agreements, that decreased the size of the Japanese military,Footnote34 and made Japan dependent of trade with other nations. The independence ...
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  • Causes Of The Showa Restoration - 1,772 words
    ... parliament, transformed this sense of a national crisis into a total shift in foreign policy. These "restorationists" in the military and in the public stepped up the crisis by convincing the nation that there were two enemies, the foreign powers and people within Japan.Footnote33 The militarists identified the Japanese "Bureaucratic Elite" and the expanding merchant class, the "Zaibutsu" as responsible for Japan's loss of grandeur. It was the Bureaucratic Elite who had capitulated to the Western powers in the Washington Conference and in subsequent agreements, that decreased the size of the Japanese military,Footnote34 and made Japan dependent of trade with other nations. The independen ...
    Related: meiji restoration, restoration, russo-japanese war, parliamentary government, benedict
  • Causes Of The Showa Restoration - 1,772 words
    ... liament, transformed this sense of a national crisis into a total shift in foreign policy. These "restorationists" in the military and in the public stepped up the crisis by convincing the nation that there were two enemies, the foreign powers and people within Japan.Footnote33 The militarists identified the Japanese "Bureaucratic Elite" and the expanding merchant class, the "Zaibutsu" as responsible for Japan's loss of grandeur. It was the Bureaucratic Elite who had capitulated to the Western powers in the Washington Conference and in subsequent agreements, that decreased the size of the Japanese military,Footnote34 and made Japan dependent of trade with other nations. The independence ...
    Related: meiji restoration, restoration, ruth benedict, houghton mifflin, peter
  • Ceremonies Of Food - 1,627 words
    Ceremonies Of Food Ceremonies of Food That the consumption of food is an essential part of the chemical process we call life, is obvious. But food is more than just vital to our continued physical existence. Food comforts, as well as sustains us, and there are few events or situations marking a person's life that fail to involve eating. In most cultures, food is pivotal to ceremonies involving the living and the dead; birth and death are often accompanied by food rituals and superstitions. For the Chinese, these particular events are marked with the preparation and consumption of special foods with symbolic, and often punning, meanings. Food semantics offer a fruitful inquiry into the Chines ...
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  • Closes Heritage - 936 words
    Close`s Heritage Born in Monroe, Washington, in 1940, Close studied painting at Yale University before moving to New York in 1967. Although he greatly admired Abstract Expressionist painters such as Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock and, especially, Willem de Kooning, he wrote, "They nailed it down so wellthat I couldn't do anything but weak impersonations of their work. . . . Once you know what art looks like, it's not hard to make some of it. . . . The dilemma I found myself in after having gotten out of graduate school is enjoying making art but not liking what I made." Close's paintings were based on black-and-white photographs he took of himself and his artist friends, all of whom were fairl ...
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  • Dr Grace Murrary Hopper - 1,381 words
    Dr. Grace Murrary Hopper Dr. Grace Murray Hopper was born on December 9, 1906. As a child Grace Hopper enjoyed learning about machines, technology and other countries cultures. Following her mothers love for mathematics and her fathers love for literature, Grace had high expectations for herself. Family life was large influence as she grew up, from the close relationship she had with her grandfather, a surveyor in New York City, she learned about real life at a young age. Her father, Walter Fletcher Murray, was a successful insurance broker, also taught Grace the importance of a good education to succeed in life. Her mother, Mary Campbell Horne Murray, perused a career in geometry by special ...
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  • Dragons - 1,831 words
    Dragons How many times during the night do we toss and turn, check the clock, and find it ticking away and tell ourselves, If I could fall asleep right now I would get at least five hours of sleep? But, sleep doesn't come so we continue to toss and turn. This happens to many people and may suffer from a disorder known as insomnia. People who suffer from this disorder have many complaints, and many have similar symptoms. Symptoms can vary from stress to pain to always feeling tired. Insomnia is a very difficult disease to have to live with. It is hard for both those that suffer from it and their family members. According to Linde and Savaley's, The Sleep Book, (1974), the person who has troub ...
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  • Dubaya - 930 words
    Dubaya He brought his father's sterling name, degrees from Yale and Harvard, some $13,000 left in his trust fund, and his strongest personal asset - an exuberant charm spiked with wisecracks. Bush never found much oil in Texas, but he slowly found his way. He married and fathered twin girls, quit drinking, began studying Scripture, and made his an unsuccessful foray into the family business by running for Congress. He learned to court friends and political supporters of his father, the vice president. And he hooked up with the oil investors who would eventually help him become managing partner of the Texas Rangers baseball team. Bush used the Rangers post to cultivate celebrity status and pr ...
    Related: business administration, family business, george herbert walker bush, seat, congressional
  • Early Life - 978 words
    Early Life Richard Milhous Nixon grew up in Yorba, California the son of Quakers Frank and Hannah Nixon. During Nixons childhood in Yorba, the family was always on the edge of poverty. The lemon grove was unfruitful, and there was little money for anything beyond food and clothing for the growing family. The Nixons never ate in a restaurant or took even a brief vacation. Nixons early life was one of boyish stubbornness. He swam in the dangerous Anaheim Canal in spite of repeated warnings from his father, and he insisted upon standing up to ride in the family wagon, although once a fall gave him a serious head injury. He displayed a competitive streak at an early age and would never turn down ...
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