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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: world state

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  • A Brave New World Aldous Huxley 81932, 1946 Aldous Huxley Harpercollins Publishers Ltd Ny,ny 10022 - 1,168 words
    A Brave New World. Aldous Huxley. 81932, 1946 Aldous Huxley. HarperCollins Publishers Ltd. NY,NY. 10022 . P 1 AA squat grey building of only thirty-four stories. Over the main entrance the words, CENTRAL LONDON HATCHERY AND CONDITIONING CENTRE, and, in a shield, the World State=s motto, COMMUNITY, IDENTITY, STABILITY.@ Here is a document I found on the web which helped me (embedded as an OLE object) : P 13 ANothing like oxygen-shortage for keeping an embryo below par.@ AThe lower the caste . . . the shorter the oxygen.@ P 19 AThey hurried out of the room and returned in a minute or two, each pushing a kind of tall dumb-waiter laden, on all its four wire-netted shelves, with eight-month-old b ...
    Related: aldous, aldous huxley, brave, brave new world, huxley, world aldous huxley, world state
  • Brave New World - 548 words
    Brave New World Aldous Huxley's Brave New World was published in 1946. During this time, socialism and dictatorships were the concepts of the day. These governments believed that having total power would engender a perfect society. Karl Marx (Bernard Marx), Nikolai Lenin (Lenina), and Benito Mussolini (Benito Hoover) are three men who decided to pursue this concept. Through these examples of socialism and dictatorship, it is seen that having a government that completely controls a nation, will fail. Many of the ideas that these governments thought would contribute to its success were the cause of its failure. Although technological advances, sexual promiscuity, and conformity contribute to t ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, world aldous huxley, world state, book reports
  • Brave New World - 892 words
    Brave New World The ideas presented in Huxleys Brave New World are expressed as fundamental principles of utopia, which could be achieved by classism. However, living in a so-called utopia, comes with a price. In this society, every beings destiny is planned out while they are still in their bottles. Depending on their caste, each person has his or her clearly defined role. Community, Identity and Stability is the motto and prime goal of Huxleys utopia. This goal can only be achieved by having a society divided into five caste social groups, because in such a society it is easier to maintain overall control of the people. Classism is the key to achieving the three goals of utopia, because it ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, world state, men and women, genetic engineering
  • Cost Of Stability In Brave New World - 1,631 words
    Cost Of Stability In Brave New World The Cost of Stability in Brave New World David Grayson once said that Commandment Number One of any truly civilized society is this: Let people be different. Difference, or individuality, however, may not be possible under a dictatorial government. Aldous Huxley's satirical novel Brave New World shows that a government-controlled society often places restraints upon its citizens, which results in a loss of social and mental freedom. The conditioning of the citizens, the categorical division of society, and the censorship of art and religion carry out these methods of limiting human behavior. Conditioning the citizens to like what they have and reject what ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, real world, stability, world state, world today
  • Mary Reynolds - 1,308 words
    Mary Reynolds April 24, 2000 Dr. Boitano U.S. Foreign Policy The Rise of the Superpower Russia and the United States grew to become the main superpowers in the arena of international relations during a specific time in history. The emergence of these two countries as superpowers can be traced back to World War II. In order to be a superpower, a nation needs to have a strong economy, an overpowering military, immense political power, and a strong national ideology (Aga-Rossi 65). It was World War II, and its results that caused each of these countries to experience such a plurality of power (Ovyany 97). Before the war, both nations were fit to be described as great powers, but it would be inc ...
    Related: mary, reynolds, third world, axis powers, ensuring
  • Roman And Greek Kingdoms - 1,127 words
    Roman And Greek Kingdoms The Romans, unlike the Greeks were not gifted in abstract thought. They constructed no original system of philosophy, invented no major literary forms, and made no scientific discoveries. Yet, they excelled in the art of government and empire building, they created a workable world-state and developed skills in administration, law, and practical affairs. In the Punic Wars, the Roman republic defeated the Carthaginians in North Africa and Rome inherited the Pergamene Kingdom from the last of the Attalids in 133 B.C. Rome became heir to the legacy of the Hellenistic world of the Greeks. The Hellenistic period which lasted 300 years in is noted by the death of Alexander ...
    Related: greek, greek art, greek culture, roman, roman architecture, roman art, roman empire
  • The Eleventh Commandment - 1,106 words
    The Eleventh Commandment The Eleventh Commandment portrayed the state church as being the supreme dictator. It is through the eleventh commandment that the church held it's power and control over the masses. Without the church and it's leaders to guide the masses, their society would have collapsed. However, compared to Brave New World, the whole society is conditioned to "work for everyone else"(Huxley 67) by the abuse and daily consumption of soma. Without the drug called soma, their society would have also collapsed due to withdrawal symptoms. The underlying reality between the two societies is that the masses are manipulated, controlled, and brainwashed, without resistance, to obey and f ...
    Related: commandment, mustapha mond, world state, enforcement agency, psychological
  • Wwii Rise Of The Superpowers - 2,058 words
    WWII - Rise of the Superpowers Rise of the Superpowers (USA & USSR) from events prior to and during WWII World War II: the process of superpowerdom It is often wondered how the superpowers achieved their position of dominance. It seems that the maturing of the two superpowers, Russia and the United States, can be traced to World War II. To be a superpower, a nation needs to have a strong economy, an overpowering military, immense international political power and, related to this, a strong national ideology. It was this war, and its results, that caused each of these superpowers to experience such a preponderance of power. Before the war, both nations were fit to be described as great powers ...
    Related: wwii, axis powers, historical background, continental europe, super
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