Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: world affairs

  • 35 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Anaysis Of Turkey - 2,167 words
    ... t's earthquake. Turkey has had difficulty putting together a 2000 budget and the talks with International Monetary fund are being delayed. The task of computing the costs of the earthquake is going to dictate when decisions will be made regarding loans from the IMF. The IMF pledged financial resources in July if Turkey makes reform progress. The government has moved quickly on structural reforms, pushing banking, pension, and international arbitration laws through parliament. But government sources say Turkeys lack of commitment to a tight fiscal policy for 2000 have raised concerns about the fate of the talks. (WASHINGTON, Sept 09,Reuters) Foreign Debt: (4)***(4) Funds will continue to ...
    Related: anaysis, turkey, job creation, labor force, banking
  • Belgium - 901 words
    Belgium The Workshop of Europe One of the many fascinating countries in Europe is Belgium. In northwestern Europe lies this country. It is small in size, but there are many people who live in Belgium which makes it one of the most densely populated European counties. It plays an important part in world affairs as NATO is located in its capital of Brussels. Many manufactured goods are produced here, as it is nicknamed the Workshop of Europe. North to south measures about 100 miles and about half is hilly land. Belgium is lower than most European countries. On the north east this countys boundary is formed by the North Sea, on the south west by France, on the east by Luxembourg and Germany, an ...
    Related: belgium, belgium congo, middle ages, european countries, stock
  • Britain And Europe In The Seventeenth Century - 1,595 words
    Britain and Europe in the Seventeenth Century Britain and Europe in the Seventeenth Century J.R. Jones, a Professor of English History in the School of English Studies at the University of East Anglia, England, in Britain and Europe in the Seventeenth Century, has written a very informative and interesting book. Britain and Europe in the Seventeenth Century is a relatively short book that deals with the impact that Britain had on European affairs at the beginning of the seventeenth century. The thesis is basically summed up in the title of the book. To expand on the thesis, Dr. Jones emphasizes the close interdependence of Britain and Europe in the seventeenth century, and shows that events ...
    Related: britain, seventeenth, seventeenth century, world affairs, english revolution
  • Catherine The Great - 1,069 words
    Catherine The Great CATHERINE THE GREAT EMPRESS OF ALL RUSSIA Catherine II (a.k.a. Catherine the Great) Catherine II, or Catherine the Great, empress of all Russia, did much to continue the process of Westernization reforms began by Peter the Great. Catherine was devoted to art, literature, science, and politics. Many people say she had a great gift and was a great leader, thus she was awarded with the name "the Great" She helped develop schools, hospitals, and many other organizations for the country. She was a shrewd leader and autocrat and helped to continue and further reforms made by Peter the Great, finally making Russia a permanent European power. Originally named Sophie Frederick Aug ...
    Related: catherine, catherine the great, peter the great, orthodox church, western europe
  • Cats Cradle - 934 words
    Cat's Cradle Cat's Cradle is, Vonnegut's most highly praised novels. Filled with humor and unforgettable characters, this apocalyptic story tells of Earth's ultimate end, and presents a vision of the future that is both darkly fantastic and funny, as Vonnegut weaves a satirical commentary on modern man and his madness (Barnes and Noble n.pag). In Cat's Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut uses satire as a vehicle for threatened self-destruction when he designs the government of San Lorenzo. In addition, the Bokonists practice of Boko-maru, and if the world is going to end in total self destruction and ruin, then people will die, no matter how good people are and what religion people believe. An example of ...
    Related: cats, cradle, economic reform, good people, unsuccessful
  • Cats Cradle - 930 words
    Cat's Cradle Cat's Cradle is, "Vonnegut's most highly praised novels. Filled with humor and unforgettable characters, this apocalyptic story tells of Earth's ultimate end, and presents a vision of the future that is both darkly fantastic and funny, as Vonnegut weaves a satirical commentary on modern man and his madness" (Barnes and Noble n.pag). In Cat's Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut uses satire as a vehicle for threatened self-destruction when he designs the government of San Lorenzo. In addition, the Bokonists practice of Boko-maru, and if the world is going to end in total self destruction and ruin, then people will die, no matter how good people are and what religion people believe. An example o ...
    Related: cats, cradle, world affairs, economic reform, placing
  • Causes Of The Korean War - 1,355 words
    Causes Of The Korean War Causes of the Korean War Andrew Glass Global Studies Period Seven The Korean War, 1950-1953 After the USSR installed a Communist government in North Korea in September 1948, that government promoted and supported an insurgency in South Korea in an attempt to bring down the recognized government and gain jurisdiction over the entire Korean peninsula. Not quite two years later, after the insurgency showed signs of failing, the northern government undertook a direct attack, sending the North Korea People's Army south across the 38th parallel before daylight on Sunday, June 25, 1950. The invasion, in a narrow sense, marked the beginning of a civil war between peoples of ...
    Related: korean, korean conflict, korean peninsula, korean war, north korean, south korean
  • Clash Of Civilizations - 2,243 words
    Clash Of Civilizations The Clash of Civilizations suggests that world politics is entering a new phase. It is his hypothesis that the fundamental source of conflict in the New World will not be primarily ideological or primarily economic. Huntington believes that the great divisions amongst humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be in the cultural form. Nation states will still remain the most powerful actors in world affairs, but the principal conflicts of global politics will occur between nations and groups of different civilizations. Huntington states: "The clash of civilizations will dominate global politics. The fault lines between civilizations will be the battle lines o ...
    Related: chinese civilization, clash, western civilization, economic systems, north america
  • Clash Of Civilizations - 2,240 words
    ... ed to the Western impact in one or more of three ways: rejecting both modernization and Westernization, embracing both, or embracing modernization and rejecting Westernization. In the twentieth century improvements in transportation and communication and global interdependence increased tremendously the costs of exclusion. Except for small, isolated, rural, communities willing to exist at a subsistence level, the total rejection of modernization as well as Westernization is hardly possible in a world becoming overwhelmingly modern and highly interconnected. Kemalism, which is the embrace of both concepts, is based on the assumptions that modernization is desirable and necessary, that the ...
    Related: clash, western civilization, latin america, progressive era, substantial
  • Decline Of The American Empire - 2,325 words
    Decline of the American Empire In any era there are different protagonists, playing the same game on a similar board. Like a game of monopoly, there are nations competing to become the foremost leaders of their time. They amass great wealth, powerful armies, and political sway. When the influence and might of these countries transcends the confines of their boundaries, so that they become a presence throughout the world, they become empires. At times, it seems as though one of these empires wins the game, becoming the undisputed superpower in the world. Today, there is one such nation that has outlived all of its rivals in the great game, it is the United States of America. This vast empire ...
    Related: american, american civilization, american culture, american democracy, american economic, american economy, american empire
  • Decline Of The American Empire - 2,367 words
    ... for the absentee superpower. This could be the opportunity for middle powers, such as Europe and China, to exercise their own military muscle, and in the process garner international credibility. The United States has further proven its failure to embrace multilateralism, most recently when it chose not to ascend to the World Trade Organisation (whose goal it is to liberalise trade). It has also receded from its previous intentions of brining Chile into the North American Free Trade Association, as well as other international agreementsvii. Not only do these moves deny American businesses new economic opportunities, they also threaten to sour relations between the United States and its a ...
    Related: american, american dollar, american economic, american economy, american empire, american free, american model
  • European Union - 1,320 words
    European Union "We have our own dream and our own task. We are with Europe, but not of it. We are linked, but not combined. We are interested and associated, but not absorbed."1 Winston Churchills famous quote aptly describes Britains intentions towards European integration. In this essay I shall attempt to show that Britains relationship towards European integration has been one of a reluctant union, supporting free trade and mutually beneficial cooperation, while attempting to distance itself from economic and cultural unity with Europe, and I will finish by describing the effects on Britains sovereignty since joining the European Union . The term integration can be understood, in context ...
    Related: european central, european community, european court, european currency, european economic, european integration, european parliament
  • Foreign Policy - 1,082 words
    Foreign Policy With the world balancing on the edge of destruction, foreign relationships are extremely important to the United States of America. The United States is fully recognized as the most powerful nation on the planet earth, and with that power comes a definitive sense of responsibility. The U.S. needs to pay close attention to this responsibility if it hopes to keep its place on the throne as king of the nations. This is where the United States foreign policy comes into play. Foreign policy is essentially positive or negative interaction with other nations as well as the goals and principles that are included (Morrison #1 607). The United States have a couple of choices concerning ...
    Related: foreign aid, foreign policy, states foreign, united states foreign, united states foreign policy
  • Global Capitalism - 1,063 words
    Global Capitalism Global capitalism and the state 'Globalization' is a term that has come to be used in recent years increasingly frequently and, arguably, increasingly loosely. In a close analysis of the term, the author focuses on the concept of globalization as the transcendence (rather than the mere crossing or opening) of borders arguing that this interpretation offers the most distinctive and helpful insight into contemporary world affairs. The article goes on to explore one of the key questions raised by this trend, namely how the growth of supraterritorial space has altered capitalism in general, and the role of the state within capitalism in particular. The author concludes by sugge ...
    Related: capitalism, global capitalism, policy analysts, relations theory, sovereign
  • Global Positioning System - 998 words
    Global Positioning System Introduction I. What is GPS? A. History B. Development II. How Does GPS Work? A. Satellites and Receivers B. The Three Parts of GPS III. Applications of GPS A. Military B. Civilian Conclusion The Global Positioning System With the proliferation of satellite-based defense systems and their continuing presence in the media it makes us more aware of our national defense. The United States is large, economically strong and a sometimes tumultuous presence in the global community. Although we may feel secure because of our superior technology and defense capabilities, our size and position in world affairs can make us a target for some countries. We can no longer be conce ...
    Related: global community, global positioning system, positioning, positioning system, coast guard
  • Hawaiian Overthrow - 1,234 words
    Hawaiian Overthrow The 19th century will live in infamy in Hawaiian hearts; it was a century of great change in Hawaiian society. The old system of mana and the sharing of the land were slowly replaced, the arrival of missionaries would signal the period of greatest change in Hawaiian society. Between the arrival of Captain James Cook and the missionaries, the Hawaiian monarchy was able to maintain some sort of independence and keep the old Hawaiian system in place. Everything began to change that eventually lead to the overthrow of the monarchy and the annexation of the Hawaiian Islands to the United States. This was a very long process and it is hard to decipher who was responsible for the ...
    Related: hawaiian, hawaiian islands, overthrow, royal family, san francisco
  • Japans Culture - 907 words
    Japan's Culture Japan's Culture The Japanese culture dates back to 10,000 BC with many fascinating periods and events. They span from the days of the samurai and shogun, to 1945 when the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. Although a bomb would be a devastating blow for any country, rapid industrialization and aid from the United States brought Japan to the forefront of world affairs. In the following moments I will attempt to highlight some of the many unique characteristics that Japan has woven throughout its nation. This will include the climate, people, religion, customs, and business protocol. Anyone seeking further information on topics I was unable to cover may wish to refer to my s ...
    Related: japanese culture, cultural norms, atomic bomb, japanese business, highlight
  • Mary Reynolds - 1,308 words
    Mary Reynolds April 24, 2000 Dr. Boitano U.S. Foreign Policy The Rise of the Superpower Russia and the United States grew to become the main superpowers in the arena of international relations during a specific time in history. The emergence of these two countries as superpowers can be traced back to World War II. In order to be a superpower, a nation needs to have a strong economy, an overpowering military, immense political power, and a strong national ideology (Aga-Rossi 65). It was World War II, and its results that caused each of these countries to experience such a plurality of power (Ovyany 97). Before the war, both nations were fit to be described as great powers, but it would be inc ...
    Related: mary, reynolds, third world, axis powers, ensuring
  • Monroe Doctrine - 1,566 words
    Monroe Doctrine The Monroe Doctrine can be considered as the United States first major declaration to the world as a fairly new nation. The Monroe Doctrine was a statement of United States policy on the activity and rights of powers in the Western Hemisphere during the early to mid 1800s. The doctrine established the United States position in the major world affairs of the time. Around the time of the Napoleonic Wars in the 1820s, Mexico, Argentina, Chile and Colombia all gained their independence from Spanish control ("Monroe Doctrine" 617). The United States was the first nation to recognize their independence from Spain. The European powers had still considered the new nations as still be ...
    Related: doctrine, james monroe, monroe, monroe doctrine, president james monroe, president monroe
  • Nixons Foreign Policy: A Global Balance Of Power - 1,559 words
    Nixon's Foreign Policy: A Global Balance Of Power Nixons Foreign Policy: Global Balance of Power Period: 7 Background Richard Nixon entered office in the midst of one of the gravest foreign policy crises in American history. The Cold War was at its height, hundreds of thousands of American troops were in Vietnam, and the views of society were split down the middle. With the aid of his national security adviser and secretary of state, Henry Kissinger, Nixon felt that it was imperative to change Americas foreign policy. They felt that it was necessary to support our interests in the long run, they felt it necessary to have a balance of power throughout the world in order to ensure peace and pr ...
    Related: american foreign, american foreign policy, foreign affairs, foreign policy, nixon administration, nuclear power, richard nixon
  • 35 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2