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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: workplace

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  • Aids In The Workplace - 222 words
    Aids In The Workplace There are many employers that have learned about fair and equitable treatment of AIDS infected employees the hard way, through the court system. Its not surprising that employers have violated employee human rights or equal employment regulations in dealing with HIV infected personnel in the workplace. The fear of a deadly transmitted disease some call homosexual influenced, has people overreacting and ostracizing the infected worker. Employers as well as the general public must get educated about this virus. This AIDS virus will continue to affect the workplace at a greater pace unless a cure is discovered. "The pool of infected people of working age is already so larg ...
    Related: aids, workplace, strategic plan, general public, cure
  • Collective Bargaining In The Workplace - 2,202 words
    Collective Bargaining In The Workplace Britain has one of the most developed systems of collective bargaining in the world, especially amongst manual workers. Its sophistication is one of the main reasons why British workers traditionally pressed less for the statutory provision of basic rights in the work place than their Continental colleagues. Most trade unionists prefer to put a grievance through procedure' rather than go to an industrial tribunal. Dubin has described collective bargaining as the great social invention that has institutionalised industrial conflict' and by the Donovan Commission as right which is or should be the prerogative of every worker in a democratic society'. It c ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective action, collective bargaining, workplace
  • Collective Bargaining In The Workplace - 2,241 words
    ... d by the parties to be a legally enforceable contract unless the agreement - (a) is in writing, and (b) contains a provision which (however expressed) states that the parties intend that the agreement shall be a legally enforceable contract (2) Any collective agreement which does satisfy these conditions in subsection (1)(a) and (b) above shall be conclusively presumed to have been intended by the parties to be a legally enforceable contract.' There are four main advantages claimed for the legal enforcement of collective agreements: (a) collective agreements would have to become both more comprehensive and more precise in defining the rights and obligations of each party if their meaning ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective bargaining, workplace, different levels
  • Cultural Diversity In The Workplace - 1,367 words
    Cultural Diversity In The Workplace Juan Concepcion Managing Diversity in the Workplace Cultural diversity in the workplace is becoming more and more prevalent. Corporations in all industries are encouraging minorities, women, elderly workers, people with disabilities as well as foreign workers to join white males in the workplace. The following analysis will focus on these groups and how companies are encouraging them to join an ever-expanding workplace. Even if affirmative action is dismantled, diversity of the workforce is clearly here to stay. Business owners and managers, experts say, will still need to maintain or step up efforts to recruit and advance ethnic minorities in the year 200 ...
    Related: cultural diversity, diversity, diversity in the workplace, diversity management, diversity training, managing diversity, workplace
  • Cultural Diversity In The Workplace - 1,376 words
    ... anded. Today, diversity is a serious corporate initiative that is seen as helping those at a disadvantage. Through their commitment and involvement of diversity issues, Xerox was awarded the prestigious Malcolm Baldridge quality award in 1989 for its three decade campaign to hire and promote women as well as minorities (Managing diversity: Lessons from the private sector, AOL Electric Library). The company has been a leader in the development of diversity initiatives which include programs designed to improve employee motivation, and teamwork through helping people to understand differences in gender and race as well as disabilities. Although some of these programs go back over thirty ye ...
    Related: cultural diversity, diversity, diversity in the workplace, diversity training, managing diversity, workplace
  • Diversity In The Workplace - 1,433 words
    Diversity In The Workplace DIVERSITY IN WORKPLACE ABSTRACT: As companies are becoming more and more diverse its becoming more and more important for companies to understand and manage it. The people of different background, races, religion creates diverse workforce. There is an importance of having diverse workforce to provide better performance. There are perspectives of managing the diverse workforce, which require organization leaders and managers of being responsible of attaining better diverse workforce. INTRODUCTION Diversity means differences, difference of age, sex, race, religion and culture etc. People with different demographic differences working in the organization makes diverse ...
    Related: cultural diversity, diversity, diversity in the workplace, diversity management, managing diversity, workplace
  • Diversity In The Workplace 8211 How Different Cultures Helped Shape Our Nation - 1,986 words
    Diversity In The Workplace - How Different Cultures Helped Shape Our Nation Diversity in the Workplace - How Different Cultures Helped Shape Our Nation Today the United States of America is regarded as a global economic leader. The standard of living in the U.S. is higher than that of most other nations. Our nation is considered an economic super-power. Economic needs have often caused Americans to seek immigrants as workers, and economic opportunities have attracted foreigners. The United States is a nation of immigrants. Our nation has been shaped by successive waves of immigrants who have played major roles in our changing economy. The overwhelming majority of immigrants who enter the Uni ...
    Related: cultural diversity, different cultures, diversity, diversity in the workplace, workplace
  • Drug Testin In The Workplace - 1,397 words
    ... on or probable cause can also lead to the absence of Equal protection under the law, the Fourteenth Amendment (Holtorf, 135). The Fourteenth Amendment was cited as protection against selection of a group of athletes for testing by the National Collegiate Athletic Association without demonstrating a likelihood that drug use was prevalent in that population (Holtorf, 136). Drug tests today are considerably weak. Mistakes and errors swarm the vast business of drug testing. Clinical laboratories are not experienced with the special requirements for specimen collection, analysis, storage, documentation, transport, and handling (McBay, 33B). Often times, simple mistakes such as mislabeling or ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug administration, drug test, drug testing, drug treatment, food and drug administration, illicit drug
  • Electronic Surveillance In The Workplace - 285 words
    Electronic Surveillance In The Workplace In 1957, a Coach and an athlete met at the University of Oregon, and together they went on to establish the most successful athletic footwear company in the world. Bill Bowerman and Phil Knight are these founders. The history of Nike can be split up into sections of three decades. From 1961 to 1971, Knight decided that dealing Tiger, a Japanese company, would break up the World domination in athletic shoes by Germany. He traveled to Japan and met with the executives for Tiger. When asked what company he represented, Knight, caught off guard, uttered the words Blue Ribbon Sports, giving birth to the forerunner of Nike. Soon the revenue on the company b ...
    Related: electronic surveillance, surveillance, workplace, blue ribbon, japanese company
  • Factors For Success In The Workplace - 1,527 words
    Factors For Success In The Workplace Factors for Success in the Workplace A Paper Prepared for Production and Operations Management Class, MGMT 4318 Charles W. Boisvert 17 February, 1996 I certify that I am the author of this work, and that any assistance I received in its preparation is fully acknowledged. I have cited any source from which I used data, ideas or words, either quoted or paraphrased. I also certify that this work was prepared by me especially for this course. Thesis Sentence This paper will examine the Base Central Test Facilities ability to meet the Four Critical Success Factors while operating under USAF Downsizing and Force reduction initiatives. Table Of Contents INTRODUC ...
    Related: critical success factors, success factors, workplace, communication services, doing business
  • Factors For Success In The Workplace - 1,725 words
    ... void problems like those above however, in most cases it just drives up the cost. Our military contractors are Downsizing just as we are and must be allowed some leeway with some of these burdensome standards in order to compete. This would enable them to develop and market more items that have dual uses without sacrificing the reliability we need (NPR, 1993). At a more local level the BCTF has been working with many commercial companies to insure that the off-the-shelf equipment we buy is reliable. In the past year we have been testing the Windows 95 software on various systems and configurations. Any bugs or problems we found were forwarded to Microsoft for corrective action. Informati ...
    Related: critical success factors, success factors, workplace, vice president, national academy
  • Gender Communication In The Workplace - 1,845 words
    Gender Communication In The Workplace Communication between males and females has always been somewhat complicated. Because we are arguing that males and females have different cultures we wanted to take a look at what some of these differences might be. According to our research the inherent differences between male and female culture are the different roles that society holds for them and the ways these roles lead to different communication styles. The stereotypes that men and women grow up with affect the types of ways in which they communicate. We first wanted to take a look at how they specifically differ while men and women are arguing or having normal conversations. We also looked at ...
    Related: communication style, effective communication, gender, workplace, social issues
  • Positive Changes In The Workplace - 1,261 words
    Positive Changes In The Workplace Positive Changes in the Workplace Hi ho, hi ho, it's off to work we go. So sang the charmingly quirky dwarfs in Disney's Snow White. In many ways they stood for the hopes of mid-century Americans: Hold down a secure job, produce your share of goods or products, do what the boss says, go with the program, and earn enough to support a comfortable lifestyle for yourself and your family. Things haven't really changed all that much--or have they? Only a few of us are currently involved in any type of manual labor or production. In fact, more than 80% of the workforce is in a service position according to most of the information we receive in our Human Resource of ...
    Related: positive effects, workplace, states secretary, tough times, vice
  • Positive Changes In The Workplace - 1,230 words
    ... tress to survive, to kill the mastodons and live for another season. We really have not changed all that much. Today's workplace requires us to give our best as often as possible. James Kouzes feels that Opportunities to challenge the status quo and introduce change opens the doors to doing one's best. Challenge is the motivation environment for excellence (Kouzes, Posner 39). The only exception that needs to be brought out by that is that we need to give people a change to get used to the changes before we introduce more. The major reason for stress is when you do not allow for the adjustment period in-between major changes. Stress has gotten a bad name. Stress of all kinds is good ---- ...
    Related: workplace, business process, total quality management, science and technology, catch
  • Sexism In The Workplace - 1,013 words
    Sexism In The Workplace Gender Roles Children learn from their parents and society the conception of feminine and masculine. Much about these conceptions is not biological at all but cultural. The way we tend to think about men and women and their gender roles in society constitute the prevailing paradigm that influences out thinking. Riane Eisler points out that the prevailing paradigm makes it difficult for us to analyze properly the roles of men and women in prehistory we have a cultural bias that we bring to the effort and that colors our decision-making processes. Sexism is the result of that bias imposed by our process of acculturation. Gender roles in Western societies have been chang ...
    Related: sexism, workplace, family life, cultural bias, narrow
  • Sexism In The Workplace - 1,020 words
    ... ustration because both men and women continue to be ruled by their early training, by the acculturation process which decides for them what sort of existence they will have. This can result in feelings of guilt when their reality and the image they have been taught from childhood do not mesh. It would be a mistake to see changing gender roles in society as threatening only to males who dominate that society. Such changes also threaten many women who have accepted more traditional roles and see change as a threat. I don't know how your mother does it all. . . I think time are harder for women these days. . . so many choices. This response is not new. When women first united for the right ...
    Related: sexism, workplace, family structure, human behavior, luck
  • Substance Abuse In The Workplace - 1,324 words
    Substance Abuse in the Workplace As widespread drug use is on the rise, many employers have begun to worry about the performance of their employees. Absenteeism, injuries, loss of productivity, employee morale, theft and fatalities are just some of the causes of drug use in the workplace. The idea of drug testing among workers has developed from society's concern over a perceived increase in the use of drugs and the relation between drug use and impairment, with resultant risks to the worker, fellow workers and the public. As early as 1987, 21% of employers had instituted drug-testing programs. Employers have begun to think that mass drug tests are the answer to their problems. What many of ...
    Related: abuse, substance, substance abuse, workplace, major problem
  • Workplace Violence - 1,241 words
    Workplace Violence Workplace Violence Statistics Workplace and Violence two words that until recently were never associated with one another. Yet when these words come together they strike terror in the lives of the people that are affected by them. Workplace, when we think of this word we think of a safe environment where we go to make to our lives better, a place to make careers for ourselves. The workplace is supposed to provide security for our families and to help to one day achieve the goal of financial freedom. Violence, when we hear this word images pop up in our head like the Jerry Springer Show, the Oklahoma City Bombing, or the latest act of violence to shock our nation the massac ...
    Related: violence, violence prevention, workplace, workplace violence, oklahoma city
  • 1954 - 1,704 words
    1954 In the year 1954, the United States was changing rapidly. President Eisenhower, a Republican, was in the midst of his first term. Eisenhower had just announced to the world that the United States had in fact developed and successfully tested the first hydrogen bomb some two years prior. Mamie Eisenhower christened the Nautilus, which was the first submarine to run on nuclear power. The great court decision, Brown vs. the Board of Education, called for the integration of the countrys public schools. Arkansas and Alabama refused to integrate and President Eisenhower was forced to send the 101st Airborne Division to integrate the schools of these states. The phrase Under God was added to t ...
    Related: washington monument, new zealand, southeast asia, emotion, police
  • 1984animal Farm Comparison - 752 words
    1984/Animal Farm Comparison How would you like to be ran by a government that controlled every aspect of your life such as where you went, how you acted, what you said, and even what you thought? You would never be in total control of your own life and if you showed any signs of individuality you would simply disappear. This is what life was like for people in the book 1984. This book shows many similarities to Animal Farm. There is a totalitarian government and characters in the book Animal Farm, such as Napoleon and Squealer, can effectively be compared to Big Brother and Winston of 1984. I'll explain to you that the two books have the same theme too; absolute power corrupts absolutely. Th ...
    Related: animal farm, comparison, farm, political system, economic affairs
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