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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: blame

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  • Media: Not Totally To Blame For The Violence In Society - 997 words
    Media: Not Totally To Blame For The Violence In Society People are quick to blame violence in our society on television, movies or video games because they are simple believable targets. We have to look beyond this disinformation and attack the real causes for the violence in our society. Violence in television programs, movies, or video games will not make a person kill someone else. People watch violent images all the time, and only a very small percent of them actually commit violent crimes. Research on the subject does not necessarily support the argument, but they do not counteract it either. The research is too often inconclusive and to base our opinions on this matter without concrete ...
    Related: blame, modern society, violence, violence on television, political machine
  • Who Is To Blame For The Deaths Of Romeo And Juliet - 1,204 words
    Who Is To Blame For The Deaths Of Romeo And Juliet? Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy about two star crossed lovers whose love cannot apart them from their two feuding families. In this essay I will state who or what are responsible for their deaths, the main theme of the story is hatred and fate. Firstly I must introduce the two families because their attitude of hatred is responsible for the deaths mainly because if they hadnt quarrelled then maybe Romeo and Juliet wouldnt have got married in secret. Resulting in the feud all the members perpetuated the feud this is illustrated by Tybalt from the Capulet family, Juliets cousin, he started the fight that resulted in Romeo getting banished and h ...
    Related: blame, juliet, juliet romeo, romeo, romeo and juliet
  • Whos To Blame - 1,066 words
    Who's To Blame Who's To Blame? Looking at the world today, we can see that there are many things that have changed throughout time. One of these things would be that people are living longer and healthier lives. On the other hand there are also people that are not living such heal y lives and for a reason that seems to be a mystery. No matter how much time or research scientists put into these issues they never seem to solve some of the great mysteries that plague humans today. Some of these issues would be cancer, AIDS, and he t disease. Some people think that these problems have just recently come up in society, when in reality these sicknesses have been around for many years. A major thin ...
    Related: blame, doctor who, whos, breast cancer, heart disease
  • Knowledge, Ability, And Skill - 2,072 words
    ... t doctors. You take 20 pills a day, or Dad, you drank eight cans of beer every evening this week; by 8:00 p.m. you were drunk and asleep. Intervention Presentation Guidelines Page 2 4. Data should specify the date or time when a chemically related event or behavior occurred. The more specific we can be about when, where, and with whom a chemically related incident occurred, the more credible we will be. Also remember that the chemically dependent person was probably intoxicated when these incidents happened and was therefore not perceiving or sensing accurately. The more information we can provide them, the more we will help them recall these incidents. Data should specify when an incide ...
    Related: skill, customer relations, basic principles, united front, rude
  • Buckley Jr - 2,713 words
    1. WM. F. BUCKLEY JR. Last summer WFB was asked by the New York Bar Association to make a statement to the panel of lawyers considering the drug question. He made the following statement: We are speaking of a plague that consumes an estimated $75 billion per year of public money, exacts an estimated $70 billion a year from consumers, is responsible for nearly 50 per cent of the million Americans who are today in jail, occupies an estimated 50 per cent of the trial time of our judiciary, and takes the time of 400,000 policemen--yet a plague for which no cure is at hand, nor in prospect. Perhaps you, ladies and gentlemen of the Bar, will understand it if I chronicle my own itinerary on the sub ...
    Related: buckley, illegal drug, medical care, federal government, princeton
  • Buckley Jr - 2,624 words
    ... alleviate the symptoms of glaucoma; to improve appetite dangerously reduced from AIDS. They use it as an effective medicine, yet they are technically regarded as criminals, and every year many are jailed. Although more than 75 per cent of Americans believe that marijuana should be available legally for medical purposes, the Federal Government refuses to legalize access or even to sponsor research. 2. Drugs are here to stay. The time has come to abandon the concept of a "drug-free society." We need to focus on learning to live with drugs in such a way that they do the least possible harm. So far as I can ascertain, the societies that have proved most successful in minimizing drug-related ...
    Related: buckley, war on drugs, johns hopkins, community policing, stick
  • 22399 - 1,303 words
    2/23/99 The Hindenburg Disaster Count Ferdinand Von Zeppelin and his crew operated their first airship nearly one hundred years ago. Airships are big controllable balloons, also known as dirigibles. There are three classes of airships, rigid, nonrigid and semirigid. Rigid airships (zeppelins) use framework in the interior to keep their shape. Semirigid airships are a combination of framework and gas pressure to maintain their shape. Nonrigid airships (blimps) rely solely on air pressure to keep their form. They are all propelled with engines, use rudders and elevator flaps for steering and have a gondola where passengers travel. The pride of the zeppelin works was a rigid airship which was o ...
    Related: major general, sporting events, imbalance, nose
  • Thousand Cranes By Yasunari Kawabata - 1,658 words
    ... ly maintains throughout the course of the story. The last words of the book reinforce this continued loathing- " 'And only Kurimoto is left.' As if spitting out all the accumulated venom on the woman he took for his enemy, Kikuji hurried into the shade of the park." I think that it can safely be concluded that this is one aspect of his past that Kikuji will never change his position on. As Chikako cleans the cottage, "The sound of her broom became the sound of a broom sweeping the contents of his skull, and her cloth polishing the veranda a cloth rubbing at his skull." This extraordinary metaphor gives us great insight into Kikuji's attitude towards his past and his memories. There are t ...
    Related: good thing, cottage, altering, questioning
  • A Battle For Adulthood - 410 words
    A Battle for Adulthood Throughout the novel The Red Badge of Courage, written by Stephen Crane, a theme is portrayed within a battle that takes place during the Civil War. It is that each person must find the courage to win his or her won battle for maturity or adulthood. A soldier, who is also the main character, Henry Fleming, exemplifies this theme. Henry Fleming begins as an immature soldier who enlists in the army without knowing a reason why. Henry has a romantic view of the war, and expects it to be glorious: "They [battles] might not be distinctly Homeric, but there seemed to be much glory in them. He [Henry] had read of marches, sieges, conflicts, and he had longed to see it all." H ...
    Related: adulthood, main character, red badge of courage, civil war, army
  • A Dark Moment In Time - 830 words
    A Dark Moment in Time The book, The Crucible by Arthur Miller, is a well-written drama of how scapegoating gone to the extreme can bring about tremendous contention and chaos even among the simplest of people. In this case, the victims of scapegoating were the citizens of Salem, Massachusetts. I feel that Miller did an excellent job on the way in which he conveyed the setting, characters, and plot. The story takes place in Salem, Massachusetts in 1692. In their society there is only black and white, right and wrong. Given that the era is the 1600's we know that their lives weren't very complex back then. The people back then mainly farmed and worked from sun up till sun down. Therefore we kn ...
    Related: work cited, arthur miller, john proctor, massachusetts, embarrassment
  • A Doll House - 1,376 words
    ... he will use Nora to influence Torvald to promote him to second-in-command who actually runs the bank. When he does not get his promotion but rather a dismissal, out of anger and revenge sends a letter to Torvald explaining Noras forgery and lies. Krogstads turning point comes when his old flame, Christine, comes to him to reconciliate. She wants someone to love and someone to take care of and Krogstad fits the description. She explains that she had to jilt him not because she did not love him but to marry someone with enough money to support her family. Krogstad confesses that her rejection was the beginning of his downfall. Krogstad is hesitant at first to trust her love but Christines ...
    Related: doll, doll house, second letter, human race, courtly
  • A Farewell To Arms - 803 words
    A Farewell To Arms Love is impossible to explain or fully understand; it is enfable and war is merely an outcome of disputes between ignorant aristocrats. A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway, is a novel about love and war. The narrator, Fredrick Henry is a war-time ambulance driver, and Catherine Barkley is an English nurse, who find themselves in a love affair which must maneuver itself around the restrictions of World War I. The novel begins in Gorizia, Italy the center of operations for Fredricks troop, World War I. Fredrick is an American volunteer and in the Ambulance Corps for the Italian Army. He meets a English nurse Catherine named Barkley and does not truly fall in love with he ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell, farewell to arms, world war i, the narrator
  • A Living Organization Changes With Time Some Parts Of It May Remain Identical To That Which Was First Constructed Most Parts - 1,785 words
    A living organization changes with time. Some parts of it may remain identical to that which was first constructed. Most parts will adapt to changes in the world, in society, and in mankind itself. If it does not change, it withers and dies. Organizations which fail to adapt to changes, whether they like it or not, tend to become shrunken relics of their original selves. They become mummified images of a once living creation. Such an organization is the Ku Klux Klan, better known as the KKK. The Ku Klux Klan is one of the most hateful groups that still exists today. They are not as strong as they once were, but still pose a threat. I believe that the KKK should have never been formed because ...
    Related: identical, north carolina, after world, small town, threatening
  • A Loyalist And His Life - 1,490 words
    A Loyalist And His Life The called me M.J., that stood for Michael Jones. It was the early part of April in 1760 when I departed an English port and headed across the waters for the North American colonies where I planned to settle, start a family, and begin what I hoped to be a very prosperous life. It was the summer if 1760 when I planted my feet and my heart in Boston along with several black slaves that I purchased when I arrived here. I brought a hefty 10,000 British pounds in my purse, which was my entire life savings. I was twenty-two years old, turning twenty-three in the fall. I had heard so many wonderful things about this place and I could not wait to get here. When I first arrive ...
    Related: common sense, north american, american colonies, atlantic, personally
  • A Natural Curiosity By Margaret Drabble - 471 words
    A Natural Curiosity by Margaret Drabble Running along the same lines as a daytime soap opera, Margaret Drabbles A Natural Curiosity provides pertinent information about life in Northam, England, a small, quaint town just outside of London, during the mid to late 1900s. Drabble narrates the novel in third person omniscient which allows her to venture into the minds of the diverse characters. Although there exists a black and white central conflict, all of the minor conflicts stem from Alix Bowen, the first, and most essential individual. In one way or another, all of the people share some distinct connection with Alix Bowen. Drabbles description of Alix Bowens obsession with a murderer named ...
    Related: curiosity, margaret, third party, gentleman, infatuation
  • A Patriarchal World Assimilation - 1,578 words
    A Patriarchal World --Assimilation A Patriarchal World John Bodnar says it well when he suggests that the center of everyday life was to be found in the family-household. It was here that past values and present realities were reconciled, examined on an intelligible scale, evaluated and mediated. This assertion implies that the immigrant family-household is the vehicle of assimilation. I will take this assertion a step further and examine more specifically the powerful role of the patriarchal father within Anzia Yezierska's book Bread Givers and Barry Levinson's film Avalon. Yezierska's theme vividly depicts the constraint of a patriarchal world, while Levinson illustrates the process of ass ...
    Related: assimilation, old world, patriarchal, jewish american, more important
  • A Review Of Personal Relationships After Sexual Victimization - 811 words
    A Review Of Personal Relationships After Sexual Victimization A Review of Relationships After Sexual Victimization Abstract Flangan and Furman conducted two studies to examine the links between sexual victimization and perceptions of romantic, parental, and peer relationships. An attachment perspective is proposed for understanding the impact of sexual victimization on close relationships for both high school and college students. Many adolescent and young women experience some form of undesired or forced sexual experience with strangers or acquaintances. Anything from unwanted touching to rape would be considered a forced sexual encounter. The literature on college and older women shows tha ...
    Related: personal relationships, relationships, sexual, sexual behavior, sexual satisfaction, social relationships, victimization
  • A Separate Peace Thematic Analysis - 765 words
    A Separate Peace - Thematic Analysis A Separate Peace - Thematic Analysis An analysis of John Knowles A Separate Peace brings up the theme of man's inhumanity to his fellow man. What makes this novel unique is that in protesting war, Knowles never overtly referred to the blood and gore of war; he showed the consequences of war, some paralleling the nature of war and some simply laying out how World War II affected noncombatants thousand miles away. There have been many books written about war, what happens, why it happens, and why wars should stop. Knowles explains through the life of Finny why war never will cease, with only one death in the entire book; a quiet one at that. When Gene is re ...
    Related: separate peace, thematic, thematic analysis, world peace, ideal society
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,644 words
    ^^^^^^^^^^A SEPARATE PEACE: CHAPTER 1 Have you ever in your life gone through an experience so intense, so joyful, so painful, or just so important at the time, that you could only understand much later what truly happened? Isn't it a fact that when we're in the middle of an experience, we are often unable to think clearly about it because we're too busy feeling the moment's thrill or sadness to stop and come to sensible conclusions? Our high school years are just such a time: of quick growth and self-discovery, of forging as well as breaking friendships, of proving ourselves to others, in the classroom and on the sports field, and a time when we want very much to be individuals and to stick ...
    Related: separate peace, competitive edge, power over, john knowles, legs
  • A Stereotypical Media - 1,258 words
    A Stereotypical Media A Stereotypical Media The media of todays society plays the peddler to the stereotypes that plague our country. However, the media is not solely to blame. Susan Sontag states in her essay The Image World: Through being photographed, something becomes part of a system of information, fitted into schemes of classification and storage(Sontag 196). Through our own demand as consumers, the use of advertising in television, newspapers, and especially magazines relays to the public an erratic system of stereotypical information. The system of information relayed through photographic imagery in advertising directly affects the thoughts of society, on how a woman should look and ...
    Related: media, stereotypical, american worker, men and women, plant
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