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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: wilkins

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  • In A New England Nun, Mary E Wilkins Freeman Depicts The Life Of The Classic New England Spinster The Image Of A Spinster Is - 1,718 words
    In "A New England Nun", Mary E. Wilkins Freeman depicts the life of the classic New England spinster. The image of a spinster is of an old maid; a woman never married waiting for a man. The woman waiting to be married is restricted in her life. She does chores and receives education to make her more desirable as a wife. This leads to the allegories used in this short story. The protagonist life paralleled both of her pets' lives, her dog Caesar's and that of her little yellow canary. Both comparisons are of restriction and fear of freedom. The animals and the woman of this story are irreversible tamed by their captivity, and no longer crave freedom. Ideas of sin guilt and atonement are also ...
    Related: classic, domestic life, freeman, married life, mary, new england, wilkins
  • Affirmative Action - 970 words
    Affirmative Action Few social policy issues have served as a better gauge of racial and ethnic divisions among the American people than affirmative action. Affirmative action is a term referring to laws and social policies intended to alleviate discrimination that limits opportunities for a variety of groups in various social institutions. Supporters and opponents of affirmative action are passionate about their beliefs, and attack the opposing viewpoints relentlessly. Advocates believe it overcomes discrimination, gives qualified minorities a chance to compete on equal footing with whites, and provides them with the same opportunities. Opponents charge that affirmative action places unskill ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, minority groups, men and women, roger
  • Alaskan Aviation - 1,519 words
    ALASKAN AVIATION ALASKAN AVIATION Have you ever looked real close at the maps of Alaska? The next time you see a map look for the little airplane symbol in every little town and village in Alaska. That symbol indicates an airstrip. That symbol also means that that is were some unfortunate bush pilot crashed and said, "This looks like a good place for an airstrip." In the early days of Alaskan aviation it was not possible to call ahead and determine if a community had a suitable landing strip. The pilot simply flew to the village and looked for a open spot to land. A controlled crash into deep snow usually resulted. Once aviation became routine, the landing strips were refined and smoothed, b ...
    Related: alaskan, aviation, aviation industry, military aviation, arctic circle
  • Bio Outline - 2,483 words
    ... lecule of glucose requires (1) 18 ATP 7.3 kcal/mole x 18 = 131.4 kcal (2) 12 NADPH 53 kcal/mole x 12 = 636 kcal (a) Note 53 kcal/mole - ref: Campbell pg. 178 for NADH to O2 H2 O (3) Takes 767.4 kcal to make 1 molecule of glucose (686 kcal) (a) 686/767.4 = 89% efficiency. F. PHOTORESPIRATION (Use Study Sheet) 1. Rubisco prefers O2 to CO2 2. If rubisco binds O2 a. Process uses 6 additional ATP b. Regenerates RuBP c. Produces a 2-C compound (instead of 3-C) d. This compound is sent to peroxisome and mitochondrion (1) converted to Glycerate (3C) (2) transported back to chloroplast (3) Uses ATP to convert to 3-PGAL 3. NET LOSS OF ENERGY 4. Some plants waste as much as 50% of the energy they ...
    Related: outline, compare and contrast, citric acid cycle, krebs cycle, acid
  • Diabetes And Pregnancy - 884 words
    Diabetes And Pregnancy Deciding to have a child is one of the most important decisions of peoples lives. Diabetes is a very serious disease. It attacks million people around the world many of them women. These women one day may be thinking about having a baby. Numerous precautions must be taken by women during pregnancy. Special safeguard must be taken by women with diabetes. These precautions need to be taken due to birth defects. "An estimated 1.5 million women of child-bearing age in the United States have diabetes. A diabetic pregnancy is one of the leading causes of birth defects." (Henderson pNA) Diabetes can strike at any age and can occur in anyone. Although it is not exactly known f ...
    Related: dependent diabetes, diabetes, diabetes mellitus, diabetes type, pregnancy
  • Fight For Civil Rights - 1,219 words
    Fight For Civil Rights The Fight for Civil Rights The Civil Rights movement was a period of time when blacks attempted to gain their constitutional rights from which they were being deprived. The movement has occurred from the 1950's to the present, with programs like Affirmative Action. Many were upset with the way the civil rights movement was being carried out in the 1960's. As a result, someone assassinated the leader of the movement, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Many blacks were infuriated at this death so there were serious riots in almost 100 cities. President Johnson appointed the Kerner Commission to study the civil rights movement. The commission concluded that we are a two race soci ...
    Related: civil rights, civil rights act, civil rights movement, constitutional rights, equal rights, right thing, rights bill
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,131 words
    Genetic Engineering Genetic Engineering Anti-technologists and political extremists misinform, and over exaggerate statements that genetic engineering is not part of the natural order of things. The moral question of genetic engineering can be answered by studying human evolution and the idea of survival of the fittest. The question of safety can be answered by looking at the current precautions of the industry. The concept that society needs to understand is that with the right amount of time and money genetic engineering will help reduce disease and save countless lives. Many people do not realize that genetic engineering plays a role in many lives through out the world. Genetic engineerin ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic code, genetic engineering, nobel prize
  • Historical Highlights - 1,910 words
    ... cavation of 50 feet along the entire reach of the canal. The dirt removed from the Cut was placed in nearby valleys. These spoil disposal areas were carefully contoured and landscaped in a manner that precluded one of the most potentially serious environmental problems associated with the waterway construction. Construction of the waterway also involved the relocation or replacement of 8 railroad bridges and 14 highway bridges. The States of Alabama and Mississippi were responsible for building the highway bridges, which cost $155 million. Above is a railroad relocation showing a massive earth fill that had to be built to provide uninterrupted rail service and later was removed when the ...
    Related: gulf coast, work force, gulf of mexico, habitat, breadth
  • Internet Rating Systems: Censors By Default - 1,203 words
    Internet Systems: Censors by Default The Internet, first designed for the military and the scientific community, has grown larger and faster than anyone could have ever expected. Now being a potpourri of information, from business to entertainment, the Internet is quickly gaining respect as a useful and important tool in thousands of applications, both globally and domestically. But, the growth that the Internet has seen in the last few years has come with some growing pains. Reports of harmful information reaching children are always painful to hear; who wouldn't feel for a mother who lost a child to a pipe bomb that was built from instructions on the Internet? But the greatest pain thus fa ...
    Related: default, internet industry, internet users, rating, private sector
  • Internet Rating Systems: Censors By Default - 1,233 words
    ... me ammunition on their side, the first amendment for one and the technological shortcomings of the PICS system second. One such technological shortcoming questions how would a labeling system keep up with the ever-changing web. With new web content moving through cyberspace constantly, how can all that content be labeled? Voluntary self-labeling is the answer according to the Clinton administration (Weber 1). But that brings up many of it's own questions. The first question is: What happens if the webmaster -the person who creates the web site- decides not to volunteer? The answer is simple. The site is blocked, because the PICS system must, by default, block unlabeled sites in order to ...
    Related: default, internet users, rating, rating system, supreme court
  • Jamaica - 1,851 words
    ... found allot farther inland. A few centuries later the lives of these peaceful inhabitants was abruptly disturbed by the savage, war-like carib indians. They began to brutally conquer all of the natives of the other islands as well. But, one day it got even worse for the poor Arawaks. Christopher Columbus, under the Spanish flag, landed there in 1492. This occurrence eventually led to the extinction of the Arawak people in Jamaica. Columbus arrived on May 5, 1494 at St. Ann's Bay with his three ships, the Santa Maria, the Nina and the Pinta. As he landed he remarked "the fairest island that eyes have beheld .... all full of valleys and fields. He named the country "St. Jago" or "Santiago" ...
    Related: jamaica, sierra leone, field trip, south side, preferred
  • James D Watson - 610 words
    James D. Watson James watson was born in Chicago, Illinois on april 6th, 1928. he went to school for eight years and went to high school for two years. Then he received a tuition scholarship to the university of chicago , and went there for four years . in 1947 , he received a b.s.c DEGREE IN ZOOLOGY. HIS INTEREST WAS IN BIRDWATCHING , BUT LATER , HE GOT MORE INTERESTED IN GENETICS . AFTER HE HAD EARNED MANY EDUCATION RELATED DEGREES IN DIFFERENT SUBJECTS , HE STUDIED THE EFFECT OD X-RAYS ON BACTERIOPHAGE MULTIPLICATION . FROM 1950 TO 1951 , HE WORKED IN COPENHAGEN AS A MERCK FELLOW . HE LATER MET MAURICE WILKINS AND SAW THE X-RAY DIFFRACTION PATTERN OF CRYSTALLINE DNA . THIS MADE HIM VERY I ...
    Related: james watson, watson, chicago illinois, high school, diffraction
  • Kate Chopins Controversial Views - 1,779 words
    Kate Chopin's Controversial Views "Too strong a drink for moral babies, and should be labeled `poison'." was the how the Republic described Kate Chopin's most famous novel The Awakening (Seyersted 174). This was the not only the view of one magazine, but it summarized the feelings of society as a whole. Chopin woke up people to the feelings and minds of women. Even though her ideas were controversial at first, slowly over the decades people began to accept them. Kate O'Flaherty Chopin was raised in St. Louis in the 1850's and 1860's. Chopin had a close relationship with her French grandmother which lead to her appreciation of French writers. When she was only five Chopin's father, Thomas O'F ...
    Related: controversial, kate, kate chopin, oscar chopin, women writers
  • Larry Bird - 1,300 words
    Larry Bird One of the greatest basketball players of all time emerged from the small town of French Lick, Indiana. With a population of 2,059 people, around 1,600 of them came to watch the Valley High basketball games, especially the blond-haired shooting whiz with a funny smile named Larry Joe Bird. Following a sophomore season that was shortened by a broken ankle, Bird erupted as a junior. Springs Valley went 19-2 and young Larry became a local celebrity. Generous fans always seemed to be willing to give a ride to Bird's parents, who couldn't afford a car of their own. As a senior Bird became the school's all-time scoring champion. About 4,000 people attended his final home game. When Bird ...
    Related: bird, larry, boston celtics, front office, hoping
  • Martin Luther King - 1,600 words
    Martin Luther King Key events in the life of MLK and the civil rights movement 1929 Martin Luther King, Jr. is born to Reverend and Mrs. Martin Luther King, Sr. on January 15 in Atlanta, Georgia. 1947 King is licensed to preach and begins assisting his father, who is a pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta. 1948 King is ordained as a Baptist minister on February 25. In June, he graduates from Morehouse College in Atlanta and receives a scholarship to study divinity at Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. 1949 While studying at Crozer, King attends a lecture by Dr. Mordecai Johnson on the life and work of Mahatma Gandhi and is inspired to delve deeper into the teaching ...
    Related: luther, luther king, martin, martin luther, martin luther king jr
  • Martin Luther King - 1,616 words
    ... governor George Wallace carries out a 1962 campaign promise to stand in the schoolhouse door to prevent integration of Alabama's schools. Wallace confronts Deputy Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach, who brought a proclamation from President Kennedy. At a second confrontation later the same day, Wallace withdraws and allows the black students to register. The following day, June 12, in Jackson, Mississippi NAACP state chairman Medgar Evers is shot to death as he returns home. Byron de la Beckwith of Greenwood, Mississippi is later charged with the murder, but his two trials both result in mistrials. The March on Washington, on August 28, becomes the largest and most dramatic civil right ...
    Related: coretta scott king, luther, luther king, martin, martin luther, martin luther king jr
  • Nucleotides - 307 words
    Nucleotides I. nucleotides: sub units DNA A. Phosphate group B. 5-carbon sugar molecule (deoxyribose) C. nitrogen base 1. Adenine 2. Guanine 3. Thymine 4. Cytosine Chargaff base pairing rule: 1 = 3 and 2 = 4 II. Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Frankilin X-ray diffraction photos of DNA molecule - DNA molecules: tightly coiled helix and composed of two or three chains of nucleotides III. Chargaff builds a model of the double helix: a spiral staircase of 2 strands of nucleotides twisting around a central axis. A. alternating sugar and phosphate units B. purine and pyrimidines paired up - A can only form hydrogen bonds with T - C can only for with G. 2 strands that are complementary to each oth ...
    Related: nucleotides, double helix, amino acids, fetal, hydrogen
  • Poverty: Appalachian - 1,205 words
    Poverty: Appalachian Appalachian Poverty Poverty is a global problem, and it has existed from the beginning of civilization. Hunger, homelessness, and lack of health care are major aspects of this world-wide dilemma. Many countries are in complete poverty and a majority are third-world countries. Within the United States of America, a land of plenty, there are also pockets of extreme poverty. Governments around the world are trying to solve this huge problem. Third world poverty and Appalachian poverty, which occurred in the United States of America, have developed for various reasons, and these situations have led to a great deal of problems. Throughout the world, poverty has plagued all co ...
    Related: appalachian, federal government, racial discrimination, world poverty, warning
  • Poverty: Appalachian - 1,179 words
    ... ed in this area. Nearly seventy top software companies have entered the area since 1990 (Mcgraw 63). Over a thousand residents have been employees in software and research (63). Seventy seven point nine million dollars were used to build seventy percent more firms in 1994, which was raised by the federal government (63). The primary way to lower unemployment is to encourage future generations to get an education. The high schools today must be upgraded to meet the future needs of our nation. In high schools and colleges across the nation all students must be aquentied with the computer. Today, the computer is used for many purposes from simple spreadsheet to architectural designs. Anothe ...
    Related: appalachian, appalachian mountains, third world, north carolina, america
  • Rainbows - 1,617 words
    Rainbows A rainbow is one of our atmospheres most exquisite and marvelous creations; "one of the most spectacular light shows observed on earth" (Ahrens, 1998). When a person views a rainbow, they are getting a personal light show that no other person can see as they do. Humphreys points out that: "Since the rainbow is a special distribution of colors (produced in a particular way) with reference to a definite point - the eye of the observer - and as no single distribution can be the same for two separate points, it follows that two observers do not, and cannot, see the same rainbow." (Humphreys, 1929). Of course, a camera lens will record an image of a rainbow which can then be seen my many ...
    Related: visible spectrum, naval officer, primary colors, classics, weather
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