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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: wilfred

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  • Robert Graves And Wilfred Owen - 1,729 words
    Robert Graves And Wilfred Owen Although the poems "Recalling War" by Robert Graves and "Mental Cases" by Wilfred Owen are both concerned with the damage that war does to the soldiers involved, they are different in almost every other respect. Owen's poem examines the physical and mental effects of war in a very personal and direct way - his voice is very much in evidence in this poem - he has clearly seen people like the 'mental cases' who are described. It is also evident that Owen's own experiences of the war are described: he challenges the reader with terrifying images, in order that the reader can begin to comprehend the causes of the madness. Graves on the other hand is far more detach ...
    Related: owen, robert graves, wilfred, wilfred owen, detailed description
  • Robert Graves And Wilfred Owen - 1,794 words
    ... m, that the reader and poet are somehow to blame for the madness of the 'mental cases', in the same way that the mad men feel guilt about the men killed. Owen uses imagery in the poem in such away that the reader is actually haunted by the images of the mad men, and we are also left with a strong sense of guilt at their sacrifice for our life and sanity. The images continue to horrify throughout the rest of the stanza. One of the most shocking images is that of the mad men walking on the corpses of dead men "Wading sloughs of flesh these helpless wander" an image which is disturbing not only because of the image it creates, but also the idea that these suffering men reached the position ...
    Related: owen, robert graves, wilfred, wilfred owen, german army
  • Wilfred Owen And Alfred Tennyson - 1,533 words
    Wilfred Owen And Alfred Tennyson Attitudes to war and how they Developed Wilfred Owen and Alfred Lord Tennyson both wrote well known poetry about war. Their poems were written in different centuries and they clearly illustrate the changing attitude to war These three poems are all describing the ups and downs of war. The one author saying how war is such a great thing and how brave the soldiers were. The other author saying how terrible war is, illustrating the death and injuries. In Tennysons poem, because it was written earlier than the two poems by Owen, he describes more the glory and heroism of war, rather than the death and stupidity. All three poems make you feel pity, even if it may ...
    Related: alfred, alfred lord tennyson, lord tennyson, owen, tennyson, wilfred, wilfred owen
  • Wilfred Owens Anthem For Doomed Youth - 1,398 words
    Wilfred Owen's Anthem For Doomed Youth Notes for students Anthem for doomed Youth 1 Anthem - perhaps best known in the expression The National Anthem; also, an important religious song (often expressing joy); here, perhaps, a solemn song of celebration 2 passing-bells - a bell tolled after someone's death to announce the death to the world 3 patter out - rapidly speak 4 orisons - prayers, here funeral prayers 5 mockeries - ceremonies which are insults. Here Owen seems to be suggesting that the Christian religion, with its loving God, can have nothing to do with the deaths of so many thousands of men 6 demented - raving mad 7 bugles - a bugle is played at military funerals (sounding the last ...
    Related: anthem, national anthem, wilfred, wilfred owen, first world
  • Battle Of Britain During World War Ii - 3,029 words
    Battle Of Britain During World War Ii Battle of Britain Director: Guy Hamilton Screenwriter: Wilfred Greatorex and James Kennaway Film Genre: War Cast: Harry Andrews, Michael Caine, Trevor Howard This film is about the Battle of Britain during World War II. It happened in 1940. This movie was made 29 years later in 1969. The Nazis tried to invade Britain. The Royal Air Force of Britain fought a grave battle against the Nazis to prevent the invasion. Most of the fighting was in the air. There were lots of fighting scenes between the German planes and the RAF and their allies. This film is pretty realistic. I thought that the air battles were pretty realistic. For a film that was made in 1969, ...
    Related: battle of britain, britain, second world, world war i, world war ii
  • Bookreport - 1,222 words
    BOOKREPORT by Maximilian Schreder Malcolm X The Autobiography as told to Alex Haley Introduction When Malcolm X was murdered in the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem on February 21, 1965, he was world-famous as the angriest black man in America. By that time he had completed his autobiography, so we have now the opportunity to get information of this both hated and loved Afro-American leaders life at first hand. The book The Autobiography of Malcolm X, which he wrote with the assistance of Alex Haley, was first published in 1965. The Two Authors Malcolm X did not write his autobiography on his own, but he told his life to the journalist and novelist Alex Haley. Haley had already interviewed Malcolm ...
    Related: afro american, politics and religion, american struggle, desperate, joining
  • Dulce Et Decorum Est - 609 words
    Dulce Et Decorum Est Explication of Dulce et Decorum Est In his poem exhibiting the gruesome imagery of World War I, Dulce et Decorum Est, Wilfred Owen conveys his strongly anti-war sentiments to the reader. Through the irony found in the ending, horrific imagery, and the feeling of surrealism woven into the poem, Owen forces the reader to experience the war, and therefore feel almost as decisively about it as he does. Owen applies the rhetorical situation, sensory imagery, and figurative language to contribute to the power and anti-war sentiment of the poem. The rhetorical situation in the poem helps to make the reader accept the poems message by showing that the speaker may be trusted to b ...
    Related: decorum, dulce, dulce et decorum est, figurative language, world war i
  • Dulce Et Decorum Est - 722 words
    Dulce et Decorum Est Based on the Poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" by Wilfred Owens The poem is one of the most powerful ways to convey an idea or opinion. Through vivid imagery and compelling metaphors, the poem gives the reader the exact feeling the author wanted. The poem "Dulce et Decorum Est," an anti-war poem by Wilfred Owen, makes great use of these devices. This poem is very effective because of its excellent manipulation of the mechanical and emotional parts of poetry. Owen's use of exact diction and vivid figurative language emphasizes his point, showing that war is terrible and devastating. Furthermore, the utilization of extremely graphic imagery adds even more to his argument. Throug ...
    Related: decorum, dulce, dulce et decorum est, figurative language, wilfred owen
  • Dulce Et Decorum Est - 699 words
    Dulce Et Decorum Est Reality Dulce et Decorum Est, an anti-war poem by Wilfred Owen, ( ) conveys a strong meaning and persuasive argument. The anti-war theme and serious tone is extremely effective at portraying war as horrid and devastating. Upon my initial reading of this poem I felt overpowered by blood, guts and death. Although my reaction hasnt changed much through numerous readings, my emotional reaction becomes more intense with each reading. This poem makes me feel like I am right there watching the soldier who cannot fasten his mask fast enough and suffers the full effects of deadly gas. This poem also makes me look beyond the death and question the pain inflicted on the mothers who ...
    Related: decorum, dulce, dulce et decorum est, wilfred owen, most effective
  • Dulce Et Decorum Est Critical Analyisis - 862 words
    Dulce et Decorum Est - Critical Analyisis It is sweet and meet to die for ones country ,better known as Dulce et Decorum Est is a great poem written by war poet Wilfred Owen.It involves a tragic war situation.It is easily understood.The poem also has a very unique sound to it. Wilfred Owen was born on March 18th in 1893.He was the eldest of four children born in Oswestry.He was brought up in the Anglican religion of the Evangelical school.An evangelical man is saved not by the good he does but by faith he has in redemin power of christs sacrafice. He rejected most of his belief by 1913, the influence of his education remains visible in his poems and their themes:Sacraifice biblical language, ...
    Related: critical, decorum, dulce, dulce et decorum est, large numbers
  • First World War Memory Of Battles - 1,123 words
    First World War - Memory Of Battles The First World War was a common experience that many soldiers, of many nationalities, had to endure. Because the devastation and loss of life was so great, no nation's soldiers were spared from the horrible psychological effects of the First World War. Various books and memoirs were useful in understanding the circumstances of the War and the effects they had upon the soldiers that fought it. World War One was like no war that had ever been fought before. The advent of machine gun and heavy artillery gave armies the killing power that they had never even dreamed of. The standard tactics of the armies involved had not developed enough to accommodate these ...
    Related: first world, psychological effects, all quiet on the western front, erich maria, erich
  • Lord Of The Flies - 1,082 words
    Lord Of The Flies Symbolism in Lord of the Flies The story, Lord of the Flies, has many interesting symbols relating adult society to kids surviving on an island. Many of the characters and items in this novel such as Jack or the conch can be interpreted on a macroscopic scale but the most important being this; a microcosm of children on an island makes a great symbolic message about human nature, society and how grown-ups live and govern - and how they cannot. When you consider the time period this book was written, you can see where Golding got some of his inspiration. Europe was still recovering after WW2 and the author probably wanted to comment on the political turmoil during the 50s. T ...
    Related: flies, lord of the flies, treaty of versailles, western world, stuck
  • Lord Of The Flies - 1,202 words
    Lord Of The Flies The Shattering of Reason within a Society William Golding in his novel Lord of the Flies symbolically describes the degeneration of a civilized society in three stages. Embedded within this story of a group of young boys struggling to survive alone on a deserted island are insights to the capacity of evil within the human soul and how it can completely destroy society. After a plane crash that results in their inhabitation of the island, the boys establish a democratic society that thrives on order, necessity, and unity. Slowly, however, the peaceful society that they create shatters through a path of hatred, disrespect, murder, and the release of the true human soul. Upon ...
    Related: flies, lord of the flies, democratic society, william golding, boulder
  • Lord Of The Flies Symbolism - 1,339 words
    Lord Of The Flies Symbolism The novel Lord of the Flies, written by William Golding, is a very symbolic peace of literature. Most of the symbols are very easy to identify and explain. One exception is clothing. Clothing was over looked as a symbol until the introduction of this symbolism project. It was overlooked because in our society clothing is a natural part of our every day lives, so even when we are reading, we tend to dismiss it as symbolizing only fashion or lack of. In Lord of the Flies clothing symbolizes order, rules and democracy. As the boys clothing turns to rags, their order turns to chaos, their rules are discarded and their system of democracy is overthrown and replaced wit ...
    Related: flies, lord of the flies, symbolism, william golding, naval officer
  • Rupert Brooke - 971 words
    Rupert Brooke Rupert Brooke was one of the early poets in the war. He felt privileged like many to fight for their country. He died of illness in 1915 before having seen any action. He wrote in a romantic style of optimists towards war. He is remembered as a "war poet" who inspired patriotism in the early months of the Great War. He was good at poetry but had not seen the fear of the war. He would have been shocked to see what became of the war. His view towards war would have changed if he had. The Soldier If I should die, think only this of me: That there's some corner of a foreign field That is forever England. There shall be In that rich earth a richer dust concealed; A dust whom England ...
    Related: brooke, rupert, wilfred owen, virgin mary, flat
  • Serial Killer Mind - 2,096 words
    ... on▓s East End Whitechapel in the space of four months in 1888. His victims were all prostitutes, their throats cut and their bodies mutilated. The murders seemed as most usually are, sexually motivated. Jack the Ripper frustrated Scotland Yard, as they had little to no clues to the killer▓s identity. One thing that was obvious was that the killer was familiar with East End streets. At the time of the murders letters were sent to the police and media claiming to be that from the Ripper. One such letter was sent to George Lusk, attached was half a kidney, the writer said 'I send you half the kidney I took from one woman. The other piece I fried and ate'. The Ripper struck two t ...
    Related: killer, serial, serial killer, serial killers, the monster
  • Serial Killers: Programmed To Kill - 1,799 words
    Serial Killers: Programmed To Kill? Serial killers are one of the most fascinating and morbid groups of people to study. A serial killer as defined by Brian and Wilfred Gregg in The Encyclopedia of Serial Killers is someone who kills 3 or more people with sufficient time intervals between each known as a cooling off period. The style and motivation of the killings can vary greatly. I choose serial killers for this project because the idea of someone killing another human being on numerous occasions seemed so out there, so fringe, it just had to be studied. Listen to this letter from one of this centuries most infamous serial killers David Berkowitz (1976-1977) AKA Son of Sam. "I am deeply hu ...
    Related: serial, serial killer, serial killers, serial murder, young children
  • Social, Economical, And Political Effects Of World War I - 1,086 words
    ... ovided a place for the birth of propaganda which countries used with even more frightening results during World War II. Governments used the media to influence people to enlist and to brainwash them war into supporting the war. The French prime minister used his power to draft journalists or defer them in exchange for favorable coverage. The German right created a new mass party, the Fatherland Party. It was backed by secret funds from the army and was devoted to propaganda for war discipline. By 1918, the Fatherland Party was larger than the Social Democratic Party. Germany had become quite effective at influencing the masses. The economic impact of the war was very disaproportioned. At ...
    Related: old world, world war i, world war ii, real life, consumer goods
  • Societys Restraint To Social Reform - 1,785 words
    Societys Restraint to Social Reform Of the many chatted words in the social reform vocabulary of Canadians today, the term workfare seems to stimulate much debate and emotion. Along with the notions of self-sufficiency, employability enhancement, and work disincentives, it is the concept of workfare that causes the most tension between it's government and business supporters and it's anti-poverty and social justice critics. In actuality, workfare is a contraction of the concept of "working for welfare" which basically refers to the requirement that recipients perform unpaid work as a condition of receiving social assistance. Recent debates on the subject of welfare are far from unique. They ...
    Related: reform, restraint, social assistance, social contract, social justice, social policy, social reform
  • Summary: Lord Of The Flies - 2,820 words
    ... difficult to see. This black sensation was strengthened by the dark ashes, a reminder of the boys' carelessness. Black and darkness were used to depict empty-headed confusion. On their way to the mountaintop, Ralph's voice that had covered his inner fears and confusion, his exterior voice was silent. So that inside him, he could remember what Piggy would have thought of him at that time. He could also remember how silly they were being. A dentist's chair was used to describe the uncertainty amplified by the unsuggestive darkness. It was like sitting on a dentist's chair, wondering if he would be pulling out a tooth. The cries and roars of nature added to the mention of confusion to creat ...
    Related: flies, lord of the flies, naval officer, ritual dance, recognition
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