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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: black woman

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  • Effects Of Racial Prejudice - 1,288 words
    Effects Of Racial Prejudice The effects of racial prejudice and segregation aimed at African Americans in the south on their lives and opportunities were deep-seeded and long lasting. The effects of segregation were perhaps the most destructive because they were legal and above-board. These laws illustrated to the African American population that their struggle was not limited to battling the backward notions and violent actions of cowardly southern rednecks, but that they had to overcome the mentality and ideology of a national government and, in fact, an entire society, that was failing to recognize them as citizens worthy of the basic rights and freedoms to which they were entitled as Ame ...
    Related: negative effect, prejudice, racial, racial prejudice, rights movement
  • Exploring The Novel Sula By Toni Morrison - 1,550 words
    Exploring The Novel Sula By Toni Morrison A Strong Woman is Outcast Melody Carter Women in 20th Cen. Lit. Prof. Fiona Paton Paper 2- Nov 10, 2000 In the novel Sula, by Toni Morrison we follow the life of Sula Peace through out her childhood in the twenties until her death in 1941. The novel surrounds the black community in Medallion, specifically the bottom. By reading the story of Sulas life, and the life of the community in the bottom, Morrison shows us the important ways in which families and communities can shape a childs identity. Sula not only portrays the way children are shaped, but also the way that a community receives an adult who challenges the very environment that molded them. ...
    Related: exploring, morrison, sula, sula peace, toni, toni morrison
  • Hate Crimes In America - 1,944 words
    Hate Crimes In America Hate Crimes In America Did you know that people with blonde hair have low I.Q.s? Or that people less than five feet tall are more likely to spread a disease? How about that people with brown eyes are really worshipers of Satan? That did not sound very logical, did it? No, you know that people with blonde hair can be as smart or as unintelligent as the next person, that short people are not necessarily better hosts to disease, and that people with brown eyes can believe in whatever they want. Some people, on the other hand, would say these things made perfect sense when applied to a different race, religion, ethnic background, gender or sexual orientation. The idea of p ...
    Related: america, hate crime, hate crimes, hate groups, ku klux klan
  • How My Cousin Manuel Brought Home A Wife - 838 words
    How My Cousin Manuel Brought Home A Wife HOW MY COUSIN MANUEL BROUGHT HOME A WIFE Manuel Arguilla and Charlson Ong's stories may have an almost similar title, with each of the main characters bringing home a wife who is different from the local people. However, the newer version addresses a much more serious issue. In Charlson Ong's "How My Cousin Manuel Brought Home A Wife", the writer used contrast of characters (particularly Consuelo and Mei Lu) and contemporary language to show that even in the modern age, racial discrimination still exists and destroys one's happiness. Hearing about his son's return with a Brazilian wife, Mei Lu is devastated. Her agony clearly worsens to the extreme up ...
    Related: cousin, manuel, emancipation proclamation, black woman, psychic
  • I Know Why The Cage Bird Sings - 333 words
    I Know Why the Cage Bird Sings I Know Why the Cage Bird Sings, a 1979 movie directed by Fielder Cook, is a renowned autobiographical account of Maya Angelous youth. Based on Maya Angelous best selling novel, this film takes place during the Great Depression. The story takes place in a bigoted, vicious town in Stamps, Arkansas where Maya and her brother, Bailey, grow up with their grandmother and uncle. The family is forced to deal with racism from the KKK as well as other whites in the society. Maya begins school and proudly excels academically. Maya is pushed back and forth between her mother and grandmothers house, not being able to situate herself either way. The turning point of the movi ...
    Related: bird, cage, black woman, turning point, sexually
  • Ida B Wellsbarnett - 1,522 words
    Ida B. Wells-Barnett IDA B. WELLS-BARNETT Ida B. Wells-Barnett is first among many. She was a civil servant and fought injustices amongst the black community. Ida was born a slave in Holly Springs, Mississippi in 1862. There she witnessed the Civil War and the dramatic changes it brought to her life. During Reconstruction she found possession of previously unheard-of freedoms, her civil rights. The most dramatic change was the institution of schools for the education of blacks. The establishment of the Freedman's Aid Society founded by Shaw University, later renamed Rust College, and was where Ida attended classes. Ida possessed an interest in school, and she quickly worked her way through e ...
    Related: booker t. washington, supreme court, the awakening, mississippi, suit
  • Immigration - 991 words
    ... than that. A common belief is that aliens fulfill many of the least desirable jobs. However, most experts agree that in todays economy, there is no shortage of Americans competing for many of these same jobs. Actually, many Americans already work in these low-paying jobs. For example: the poor black woman, who works as a seamstress, Her boss asked her to train a new employee, an illegal immigrant. As soon as she finished training her new charge, she was fired. Her position, of course, went to the illegal immigrant, who was willing to work for less pay, and under deplorable working conditions. This is one example of how illegal workers depress wages, and slow, stall or prevent unionizati ...
    Related: illegal immigration, immigration, legal immigration, social services, orange county
  • Immigration Problem - 1,986 words
    Immigration Problem The world has gone through a revolution and it has changed a lot. We have cut the death rates around the world with modern medicine and new farming methods. For example, we sprayed to destroy mosquitoes in Sri Lanka in the 1950s. In one year, the average life of everyone in Sri Lanka was extended by eight years because the number of people dying from malaria suddenly declined. This was a great human achievement. But we cut the death rate without cutting the birth rate. Now population is soaring. There were about one billion people living in the world when the Statue of Liberty was built. There are 4.5 billion today. World population is growing at an enormous rate. The wor ...
    Related: american immigration, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration problem, legal immigration
  • Jim Crow By Wright - 643 words
    Jim Crow By Wright Jim Crow is an autobiographical account of author Richard Wrights education in race relations in a totally segregated south. Wright talks about his experiences growing up in the south and the racism he encountered. He attempts to show us what being on the receiving end of racism is really like, and the lessons he learned from them. I believe that Wrights intended audience seems to be directed towards white people so that they may gain an understanding of the hardships blacks went through early in our nations history. Wright starts off by explaining where he grew up. The house he lived in was located behind the railroad tracks and his "skimpy yard was paved with cinder bloc ...
    Related: crow, wright, civil war, black woman, assertion
  • Liberal Vs Marxist Feminism - 2,075 words
    ... r state that keeping mommy home is not an excuse, for many women are forced to take lower paid jobs with much heavier physical load in order to provide for their children. In the past, it was very clearly defined that office was man's job and home was women's place. Industrial revolution and technological changes forced men to use women out in the workplace. I don't think that a traditional woman of the past would make such transition. Instead, wars, diseases, poverty, labor shortages, and other influences made it necessary for many women to work. I think that our society still considers that woman's place is in her home. Why? I may think so, because women, who make up over one half o th ...
    Related: feminism, liberal, marxist, angela davis, power over
  • Lorraine Hansberry Rejected The Limitations Of Her Race And Gender And Through Her Written Works, Became A Social Activist An - 1,490 words
    Lorraine Hansberry rejected the limitations of her race and gender and through her written works, became a social activist and expanded the role of a black woman in America. Lorraine Hansberry wrote many works that allowed her to explain her views. She also explored these ideas through playwrights. Lorraine Hansberry was said to be a spearhead of the future. She was a woman who refused to be confined by the categories of race and gender (Tripp 3). Lorraine Hansberry was born in 1930. Both of her parents were activists challenging discrimination laws. Many famous black people frequently visited her home because of her parent's authority (Tripp 2). Two of these famous black Americans that ofte ...
    Related: activist, black race, gender, hansberry, lorraine, lorraine hansberry
  • Love And Color - 1,747 words
    Love And Color Is love colorblind? Just three decades ago, Thurgood Marshall was only months away from appoint- ment to the Supreme Court when he suffered an indignity that today seems not just outrageous but almost incomprehensible. He and his wife had found their dream house in a Virginia suburb of Washington, D.C., but could not lawfully live together in that state: he was black and she was Asian. Fortunately for the Marshalls, in January 1967 the Supreme Court struck down the anti-interracial-marriage laws in Virginia and 18 other states. And in 1967 these laws were not mere leftover scraps from an extinct era. Two years before, at the crest of the civil-rights revolution, a Gallup poll ...
    Related: true love, mass media, karl marx, self esteem, unmarried
  • Martin Luther King - 1,616 words
    ... governor George Wallace carries out a 1962 campaign promise to stand in the schoolhouse door to prevent integration of Alabama's schools. Wallace confronts Deputy Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach, who brought a proclamation from President Kennedy. At a second confrontation later the same day, Wallace withdraws and allows the black students to register. The following day, June 12, in Jackson, Mississippi NAACP state chairman Medgar Evers is shot to death as he returns home. Byron de la Beckwith of Greenwood, Mississippi is later charged with the murder, but his two trials both result in mistrials. The March on Washington, on August 28, becomes the largest and most dramatic civil right ...
    Related: coretta scott king, luther, luther king, martin, martin luther, martin luther king jr
  • Maud Martha - 1,107 words
    Maud Martha Maud Martha Gwendolyn Brooks was a black poet from Kansas who wrote in the early twentieth century. She was the first black woman to receive the Pulitzer Prize. Her writings deal mostly with the black experience growing up in inner Chicago. This is the case with one of her more famous works, Maud Martha. Maud Martha is a story that illustrates the many issues that a young black girl faces while growing up in a white, male driven society. One aspect of Martha that is strongly emphasized on the book is her low self-image and lack of self-esteem. Martha feels that she is inferior for several reasons, but it is mainly the social pressures that she faces and her own blackness that con ...
    Related: martha, maud, gwendolyn brooks, self esteem, subculture
  • Maya Angelou - 1,574 words
    Maya Angelou She was born under the name Marguerite Johnson, but her brother Baily renamed her Maya. Her parents, Baily and Vivian Baxter Johnson, got divorced when she was very young. Maya grew up in a very racist town. There were many problems in her life, in which she describes in her autobiographical novel "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings". At the age of 16, she became pregnant, while experimenting if her sexual preference was males or females. She had to get numerous jobs to support herself and her son, Clyde, who was later known as Guy. In 1952, she married a man named Tosh Angelos, but due to his atheist ideals, which grew to be unacceptable to Mayas religion, the marriage soon ended. ...
    Related: angelou, angelou maya, maya, pulitzer prize, president bill
  • My Acquaintance With Africa - 969 words
    My Acquaintance With Africa My Acquaintance With Africa I thought I knew enough about Africa, this wonderful and strange continent with a hot tropical climate and a wealthy nature, which is populated by many different nations and tribes. I saw many movies, mostly about African nature and often read newspapers or magazines about frequent wars and economical problems. But I never made acquaintance with people who originated from Africa. Thus, it was really interesting to talk, even if a little to my classmate Kadra, who not long ago, two years, came here from the small East African country Djibouti. I was interested in how she has lived and thought and what problems have worried this young, be ...
    Related: acquaintance, africa, high school, teach english, drugs
  • Prejudice In Literature - 1,713 words
    Prejudice In Literature Toni Morrisons, The Bluest Eye, Alice Walkers , The Color Purple , and Richard Wrights autobiography , Black Boy , all represent prejudicy . The preceding novels show the characters were typical victims, not understading the division of power amongst races. The Bluest Eye , a heart breaking story of a little back girl living in Lorain, Ohio during the 1930s, manifest the longing of Pecola Breedloves obsession for love. In order to achieve love she would have to deny herself of her true identity and surrender to what is thought to be beautiful and superior: little white girls "gifted" with blond hair and blue eyes. The novel procalaims the nations love for little white ...
    Related: literature, prejudice, personal experience, early adulthood, denied
  • Race Issues - 1,192 words
    Race Issues In the novel, No Hiding Place, by Valerie Wilson Wesley, the main character private investigator Tamara Hayle faces many difficulties in her career in law enforcement. Wesley explores the struggles of a black woman in a white-male dominated police force and at the same time she also comments upon the constant struggle between inner-city blacks and the oppression they face from the police force. The novel is set in the modern-day and takes an introspective look at today's problems. Wesley also uses a few flashbacks from the past in order to give insight into today's problems. As the novel opens Tamara is held up at gunpoint by a black youth. From the boy's fear Tamara can tell tha ...
    Related: white race, short term, police force, walk away, absent
  • Race Relations In The Us - 1,331 words
    ... the logs in leather straps attached to their shoulders. They plowed using mule and ox teams. They dug ditches, spread manure, and piled coarse fodder with their bare hands. They built and cleaned Southern roads, helped construct Southern railroads, and, of course, they picked cotton. In short, slave women were used as badly as men, and were treated by Southern whites as if they were anything but self-respecting women. From the black women who were even partially literate, hundreds of letters exist telling of the atrocities inflicted by "massa." Both physical and sexual assaults on black women were common at the turn of the century. Nothing I have read captures the true devastation to the ...
    Related: black race, race relations, toni morrison, york press, cotton
  • Racism In Our Colleges - 1,312 words
    Racism In Our Colleges Racism has been a steady problem all through time. One of the most troublesome areas of racism is in places of education. Finding a cure for this would be a major step towards ending racism in general. No one has ever thought of a solution yet, and racism will be strong as long as there isn't one. It all started back when the colonists traded certain goods for slaves. They had never seen a black person before and thought of them as lower human beings because they did all of the colonists' work for them. Since blacks were so low, they were never given a good education. This lack of education continued throughout the centuries. Even in the 1700's slaves were never taught ...
    Related: college campus, college campuses, racism, white people, civil rights
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