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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: westward expansion

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  • How Much Land Does A Man Need By Leo Tolstoy The Greed Of Americans During Westward Expansion The Story, How Much Land Does A - 988 words
    "How Much Land Does A Man Need?" by Leo Tolstoy The Greed of Americans During Westward Expansion The story, How Much Land Does a Man Need?, by Leo Tolstoy is a story about Americans taking advantage of the Indians. Although it is set in Russia, it is about the greed that many people had at the time and the outcome of that greed. The opening scene represents the Europeans coming over to America. During that time, the mid-1800s, the Europeans were rich and their relatives in America were poor. The younger sister in the story represents the Americans and the older sister represents the Europeans. The poor Americans, like the younger sister in the story, did not mind having to work hard all the ...
    Related: american people, expansion, greed, leo tolstoy, native americans, tolstoy, westward
  • The Westward Expansion - 462 words
    The Westward Expansion The westward expansion was a new concept for Americans in the 1770s. In their minds there was a abundance of land out west just waiting to be claimed. The people that moved out west thought they were doing no harm, but in reality they committing genocide which is the complete annihilation of an entire race of people. If somebody is taking things from you that is very special to you what is your natural reaction?. Its to fight back and try to regain the special thing back. That is what the native Americans did to the settlers started to take there land so they started to defend it. But no we didnt get the clue. We had no real consideration toward the native Americans. W ...
    Related: expansion, westward, westward expansion, foreign countries, native americans
  • Westward Expansion - 1,205 words
    Westward Expansion the right of our manifest destiny to over spread to possess the whole of the continent which Providence has given to us for the development of the great experiment of liberty and federative development of the self government entrusted to us. It is right such as that of the tree to the space of air and the earth suitable for the full expansion of its principle and destiny of growth ..John.L OSullivan Manifest Destiny can be described as a phenomen that created Americas history, a movement that would embody American beliefs and American culture, it implied imperialistic expansion that the Americans believed was there right, this right led to hardships, several wars and hosti ...
    Related: expansion, westward, westward expansion, american soil, president james
  • Westward Expansion - 1,236 words
    ... er groups to move West with the American Dream held strong in the hearts of many. The animosity with the Mexicans finally came to rise in the Mexican-American wars which spanned from 1846-1848. The reasons for the eruption of the hostilities included the annexation of Texas in 1845, claims of property damage by US citizens against the Mexican government and the desire of the United States to acquire California into their boundaries (manifest destiny). After failed negotiations in 1845 regarding land, the movement of an American army was considered as act of aggression and Mexican troops were sent to protect their land, in turn America declared war on 13th May 1846. The Mexicans lacked re ...
    Related: expansion, westward, westward expansion, american civil war, pacific coast
  • Westward Expansion - 2,038 words
    Westward Expansion The Westward Expansion has often been regarded as the central theme of American history, down to the end of the19th century and as the main factor in the shaping of American history. As Frederick Jackson Turner says, the greatest force or influence in shaping American democracy and society had been that there was so much free land in America and this profoundly affected American society. Motives After the revolution, the winning of independence opened up the Western country and was hence followed by a steady flow of settlers to the Mississippi valley. By 1840, 10 new western states had been added to the Federal union. The frontier line ran through Iowa, Missouri and Arkans ...
    Related: expansion, westward, westward expansion, party platform, american army
  • Westward Expansion - 2,010 words
    ... years. The building of a transcontinental railroad with the financial assistance of the government was debated upon. Also the question of slavery in the newly acquired territories was a more troubling issue and this decided the fate of the United States for the next few years. Manifest Destiny F. Merk in his book Manifest Destiny says "a sense of mission to redeem the old world by high example was generated in pioneers of idealistic spirit on their arrival in the new world." It was generated by the immense potential in the virgin land of the American continents. Successive generations also gave this sense of mission life in various ways from the struggle of religious liberty in Plymouth ...
    Related: expansion, westward, westward expansion, old world, american character
  • American History - 1,092 words
    American History Although Britians North American colonies had enjoyed considerable prosperity during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, beginning with the Stamp Act in 1765 the British government began to put pressures on them, largely in the form of taxes and new trade restrictions, that drew increasingly resistance. (Out of Many, 133) One big reason that the loyal British citizens in North America were transformed into rebels is because of the taxes. It was not the prices of the tax, because Britain had one of the lowest taxes in the world at that time, it was the fact that Parliament had so much representation over them. The British empire was a mercantile market. They ...
    Related: american, american colonies, american history, american revolution, history, north american
  • American Revolution - 3,384 words
    American Revolution In the aftermath of the French and Indian War, Britain needed a new imperial design, but the situation in America was anything but favorable to change. Long accustomed to a large measure of independence, the colonies were demanding more, not less, freedom, particularly now that the French menace had been eliminated. To put a new system into effect, and to tighten control, Parliament had to contend with colonists trained in self-government and impatient with interference. One of the first things that British attempted was the organization of the interior. The conquest of Canada and of the Ohio Valley necessitated policies that would not alienate the French and Indian inhab ...
    Related: american, american affairs, american colonies, american population, american revolution, american revolutionary, american revolutionary war
  • American Revolution - 635 words
    American Revolution ?The American Revolution: Revolutionary or Not? In determining whether or not the American Revolution was a true revolution, one must clearly define the term ?revolution?. Historians believe that for a war to be deemed a revolution it must encompass social, religious, economic, and intellectual dimensions as well as political change. I believe that the American Revolution conclusively exhibited all of these dimensions. Socially, America began with modern values unlike those of their British ancestry. The moral of equality was the foundation on which our nation began. When the tension grew between the colonies and England, the new ideology spread and began to widen to incl ...
    Related: american, american economy, american people, american revolution, american society
  • Articles Of Confederation - 1,052 words
    Articles Of Confederation In the 1770's, as America's great thinkers and writers were declaring their desire for independence; they also established a committee to lay the foundation for the American form of government. These brilliant writers and philosophers hesitantly began designing the national level of government for use in America and named their final draft the Articles of Confederation . Out of their utter distrust of a centralized government, due to their association with the English monarchial system, the drafters deliberately established these articles as a loose confederation of states, rather than a firmly united nation. Life under the Articles of Confederation was filled with ...
    Related: articles of confederation, confederation, confederation congress, national convention, judicial branch
  • Civil War - 3,706 words
    ... iority. They also feared competition from freed slaves for their trades. The economic viability of slavery is a debatable issue. Slavery as an efficient labor system was not feasible, as the slaves did not have enough compulsion to do more than would be extracted from them by force. Slavery made the souths economic system less flexible and progressive. The success of plantation agriculture hindered the growth of a more diversified economy. The reluctance of white men to work as a free labor force due to the social stigma attached to it meant that the economy never progressed beyond the rural character to industrialization uniformly. Huge profits were made by businessmen at the expense of ...
    Related: american civil, american civil war, causes of the civil war, civil government, civil war
  • Dances With Wolves - 346 words
    Dances With Wolves A major problem in the nineteenth century was westward expansion. Although the final outcome was good, it was a struggle to move the country into the wilderness. The government was greedy and wanted to take the Native Americans' land away from them. As a political leader in that time, I would not allow such a thing to happen. The Indians would be treated with respect and able to keep their land. The white Americans would be expected to treat them as equals, rather than savages. As depicted in "Dances With Wolves," soldiers ruthlessly killed Indians on sight. They didn't care if they were a threat or not because they were told by their superiors the Indians either had to be ...
    Related: wolves, native americans, white people, save lives, outcome
  • Emancipation Proclamation - 805 words
    Emancipation Proclamation Tim Macko Feb 9, 2000 Hist 253 Paper 1 In Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men, by Eric Foner, a new political party of the period of the mid-1800's is examined. This was a party that had the partnership of the President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It was not only his beliefs but the beliefs of this political party, the republican party, that helped build tension into what would become the Civil War. It was founded as a pro-active party, a party of doers, not sayers. They wanted people to act on behalf of their beliefs and make a change in the world. Northern society was based on the idea of free labor. That a man could make himself in society by working hard. ...
    Related: emancipation, emancipation proclamation, proclamation, social classes, westward expansion
  • For Two Centuries, Americans Had Been Progressively Taking Over And Establishing - 213 words
    For two centuries, Americans had been progressively taking over and establishing a continent. People felt that westward expansion between the 17th century and the 1840s was golden, but dangerous. People felt it was feasible only through patient work and timorous calamities. With each year of national growth, the confidence and power of the people was magnified, and every step forward divulged a broader horizon. Americans began to feel that the whole continent was to be theirs to do as they please with. It was theirs to exploit and theirs to make into a great, unified nation. This was a land of opportunity, a showcase to manifest the goodness of democratic institutions, tangible proof that th ...
    Related: establishing, nineteenth century, good thing, manifest destiny, tangible
  • How Much Land Does A Man Need By Leo Tolstoy - 988 words
    "How Much Land Does A Man Need?" by Leo Tolstoy The Greed of Americans During Westward Expansion The story, "How Much Land Does a Man Need?", by Leo Tolstoy is a story about Americans taking advantage of the Indians. Although it is set in Russia, it is about the greed that many people had at the time and the outcome of that greed. The opening scene represents the Europeans coming over to America. During that time, the mid-1800s, the Europeans were rich and their relatives in America were poor. The younger sister in the story represents the Americans and the older sister represents the Europeans. The poor Americans, like the younger sister in the story, did not mind having to work hard all th ...
    Related: leo tolstoy, tolstoy, english speaking, east coast, english-speaking
  • It Could Be Said That Benjamin Franklin Was Truly The Enlightened American Of His - 674 words
    It could be said that Benjamin Franklin was truly the enlightened American of his time. He was a pioneer in the study of electricity and is world-renowned for his ideas and inventions. Today, after two hundred years, his name is still remembered by millions, and his influence is still felt world-wide. A man as great as this deserves some sort of remembrance for all that he accomplished. Recently there has been talk of adding a fifth visage to Mount Rushmore, someone who is in keeping with the four great men currently displayed. Benjamin Franklin's achievements as an inventor, discoverer, and statesman well deserve him a place on this great monument. During his lifetime, Benjamin Franklin gav ...
    Related: american, benjamin, benjamin franklin, enlightened, franklin, franklin stove, native american
  • Louisiana Purchase - 2,518 words
    Louisiana Purchase Several great American Statesmen were pivotal in shaping and molding the government of the United States. History has since forgotten some of these founding fathers. The ones remembered throughout history are those we hold up for their accomplishments. Thomas Jefferson is one of the American Statesmen that stands out from the rest as being one of the greatest contributors to our present form of government. Historian Robert Tucker described Jefferson's life as being a paradox. He was a slave holder that was not necessarily in favor of this form of servitude. He also associated himself with the yeoman farmer, yet he traveled in company with a cosmopolitan flair. So it is to ...
    Related: louisiana, louisiana purchase, louisiana territory, purchase, declaration of independence
  • Manifest Destiny - 685 words
    Manifest Destiny MANIFEST DESTINY Manifest Destiny took place in the US in the mid-1800. Manifest Destiny was used among the Americans in the 1840's as a defense for U.S. territorial expansion. It is the presumption that God had destined the American people to at divine mission of American movement and conquest in the name of Christianity and democracy. In order to understand manifest destiny we must first find its' origin. John O'Sullivan first initiated manifest destiny into America in 1845. This New York editor wrote the phrase that captured this mood when he attempted to explain American's thirst for westward expansion he wrote: the fulfillment of our manifest destiny to overspread the c ...
    Related: destiny, destiny manifest destiny, manifest, manifest destiny, westward expansion
  • Robert Bly - 1,242 words
    Robert Bly Throughout the 20th century, Robert Bly has provided a wealth of poetry on a wide variety of topics. Alongside his themes, Robert Bly has also developed different stylistic methods to convey those thoughts. Such themes vary to this day, dealing with issues that have personally affected him, and also those of society in general. His poetry is a time-line pondering solitude, the Vietnam War, nature, frustration and relationships among all sorts, conveyed not only in conventional stanzas, but in a form called "prose" poetry as well. Contributing and inspiring to many, the work of Robert Bly provides an interesting take on American poetry. Robert Blys' first collection of poems were r ...
    Related: human nature, westward expansion, time line, relationships, promoting
  • Sonntag Vs The Unabomber - 722 words
    Sonntag Vs. The Unabomber Expansion vs. Preservation William Sonntag was acclaimed in the 1850s as a painter of the dramatic landscape. In his painting "Garden of the Gods," Sonntag portrays a family in the time of the westward expansion. The very subtle painting, expressed by its loose brushwork, captures the shifting atmospheric contrasts of light and dark. Apparent in the painting is a family struggling to survive in nature. In the bottom left corner of the painting is a weather beaten shack, the home of the struggling family. This painting brings out the "live of the land" mentality, but it also incorporates the idea of expansion. When you think about life today, do we really need to exp ...
    Related: unabomber, mother earth, oil spill, ideal society, storytelling
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