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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: western world

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  • Wwii Did The Western World Do Enough For The Jews In The Holocaust - 1,180 words
    WWII - Did the Western World do enough for the Jews in the Holocaust "When they came for the gypsies, I did not speak, for I am not a gypsy. When they came for the Jews, I did not speak, because I wasnt a Jew. When they came for the Catholics, I did not speak, for I am not a Catholic. And when they came for me, there was no one left to speak." -On the Wall at the Holocaust Museum in Washington It is impossible to learn about the Holocaust and the Second World War without the question of how it possibly could have happened arising, and along with that question comes another. The question of whether or not the Western World did enough to help the Jews in Europe. What was their reaction to the ...
    Related: holocaust, jews, second world, western world, world war ii, wwii
  • Adam Smith - 803 words
    Adam Smith Adam Smith was born in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. His exact date of his birth is unknown but he was baptized on June 5, 1723. At the age of fifteen, Smith began attending Glasgow University where he studied moral philosophy. In 1748 he began giving lectures in Edinburgh where he discussed rhetoric and later he began to discuss the economic philosophy of the "simple system of natural liberty" which he later proclaimed in his Inquiry into Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. In 1751, Smith was appointed professor of logic at Glasgow university, transferring in 1752 to the chair of moral philosophy. His lectures covered the field of ethics, rhetoric, jurisprudence and politica ...
    Related: adam, adam smith, smith, moral sentiments, free enterprise
  • Aids Whats New Is The Message Getting Through We Already Know Enough About Aids To Prevent Its Spread, But Ignorance, Complac - 1,708 words
    AIDS - What's new ? ------------------- Is the message getting through? We already know enough about AIDS to prevent its spread, but ignorance, complacency, fear and bigotry continue to stop many from taking adequate precautions. We know enough about how the infection is transmitted to protect ourselves from it without resorting to such extremes as mandatory testing, enforced quarantine or total celibacy. But too few people are heeding the AIDS message. Perhaps many simply don't like or want to believe what they hear, preferring to think that AIDS "can't happen to them." Experts repeatedly remind us that infective agents do not discriminate, but can infect any and everyone. Like other commun ...
    Related: aids, whats, human cells, blood cells, usual
  • Alcoholosm - 1,240 words
    Alcoholosm Within the context of our society, drinking of alcohol is a perfectly normal activity. For most people drinking a moderate amount of alcohol can be beneficial, indeed studies suggest that moderate drinking may protect against coronary heart disease by improving insulin resistance (Gold, 1991). However, for a minority of people drinking alcohol is an activity that is fraught with danger and, for a very few, is akin to taking a poison that will almost inevitably ruin their lives. Henceforth, it is important for research purposes to define who an alcoholic is and what the effects of alcohol on that person are. An alcoholic is a person who drinks excessive amounts of alcohol habituall ...
    Related: personality type, severe mental, contributing factor, personality, drinking
  • American Imperialism - 417 words
    American Imperialism The United States became an imperialist nation at the end of the 19th century because Americans wanted to expand over seas with their belief in manifest destiny. The three factors that started American imperialism were political and military competition including the creation of a strong naval force, economic competition among industrial nations and a belief in the racial and cultural superiority of people of Anglo-Saxon decent. The Spanish American War marked the emergence of the United States as a world power. This brief war lasted less than four months from April 25 to August 12, 1898. A number of factors contributed to the United States decision to go to war against ...
    Related: american, american imperialism, central american, imperialism, latin american, spanish american
  • An Indepth Look At Hg Wells - 1,349 words
    ... sion by the Martians, who arrived from their planet in ten cylinders at 20-4-hour intervals to devastate the whole country and destroy London. The War of the Worlds impressed its readers because England was constantly being scared by the thought of possible invasions by France or Germany. The English were becoming concerned about how prepared they were to resist attack from other powers. The scientific background is plausible. People had long believed that Mars might be populated. Astronomers supported the theory that the planet was drawing farther away from the sun and therefore getting colder. Wells suggests in The War of the Worlds that the Martians would look for a warmer climate lik ...
    Related: h. g. wells, science fiction, western world, first edition, warning
  • Anaximander - 1,487 words
    Anaximander Anaximander About 530 AD the Neoplatonist Simplicius wrote an extensive commentary on Aristotle's Physics. In it he reproduced the Anaximander fragment, thus preserving it for the western world. He copied it from Theophrastus. From the time Anaximander pronounced his saying--we do not know where or when or to whom--to the moment Simplicius jotted it down in his commentary more than a millennium elapsed. Between the time of Simplicius' jotting and the present moment lies another millennium-and-a-half. Can the Anaximander fragment, from a historical and chronological distance of two thousand five hundred years, still say something to us? (Heidegger 16) Anaximander, it is widely bel ...
    Related: martin heidegger, early greek, final question, philosophy, necessity
  • Ancient Egypt - 1,006 words
    Ancient Egypt The civilization of ancient Egypt is significant in several ways. Egyptian influence on other peoples was also significant. Ancient kingdoms of the Sudan adapted its HIEROGLYPHIC writing system and other cultural elements. The two last regions and the Bible are the most important antecedents of the modern western world that owe something to Egypt. The western alphabet is derived from a Phoenician one possibly modeled on Egyptian hieroglyphs; Egyptian ideas are found in some parts of the Bible; and Greek sciences and especially, art were originally influenced by Egypt. Finally, archaeology and historical writing have made Egypt a subject of great public interest, stimulating man ...
    Related: ancient egypt, egypt, modern western, western world, universe
  • Antisemitism In Nazi Germany - 1,500 words
    Anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany Anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany Discuss the purpose anti-Semitism served for the Nazis. What form did it take once they were in power? The anti-Semitic philosophy of the Nazi party played a significant role in their rise to power during the 1930's. Economic and political conditions in Germany between 1918 and 1933 played a major role in the creation of a climate that made Nazism appeal to the German population. There was widespread unemployment and economic misery and following the trend of German history since the end of the 18th century, the German people turned towards nationalism. The Nazi party captured the nationalistic fervor of the country. The "spirituali ...
    Related: antisemitism, germany, modern germany, nazi, nazi germany, nazi party, nazi propaganda
  • Aristotle On Rhetoric - 1,207 words
    ... scientist. While at Plato's school, Aristotle developed a personal affection for Plato and learned many things from his instructor. However, he ultimately rejected Plato's fundamental concepts and developed his own theories on matters of logic, ethics, metaphysics, as well as rhetoric. After the death of Plato in 347 B.C., Aristotle moved in with a former pupil of Plato, Hermeias. During his three year stay, he married princess Pithias, Hermeias's daughter. The couple had two children: a son named Nicomachus as well as a daughter. In 342 B.C Aristotle was invited to direct the education of young prince Alexander at the court of Philip II of Macedonia. During this time he continued his s ...
    Related: aristotle, rhetoric, famous works, the prince, pupil
  • Aristotle On Tragedy - 1,046 words
    Aristotle on Tragedy Aristotle on Tragedy The Nature of Tragedy: In the century after Sophocles, the philosopher Aristotle analyzed tragedy. His definition: Tragedy then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; in language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament, the several kinds being found in separate parts of the play; in the form of action, not of narrative; through pity and fear effecting the proper purgation of these emotions. Aristotle identified six basic elements: (1) plot; (2) character; (3) diction (the choice of style, imagery, etc.); (4) thought (the character's thoughts and the author's meaning); (5) spectacle (all the visual ...
    Related: aristotle, tragedy, tragic hero, basic elements, imitation
  • Asian Affirmation And Islamic Resurgence - 1,053 words
    Asian Affirmation And Islamic Resurgence Two civilizations that were challenging the theory of Western supremacy and stressing the importance of their own culture in relation to that of the West were the Asian and Islamic civilizations. Both the Asian culture and the Islamic religion entered a great stage of revival and expansion which led to an increase in their self-confidence. Asian self-confidence was the result of rapid economic growth and development while Islamic superiority resulted from its population growth. Asian Affirmation dealt with the economic development of East Asia. It helped prove the wrong the idea that Asia lacked the incentive and the means to successfully become econo ...
    Related: affirmation, asian, asian culture, asian development, islamic, islamic law, islamic religion
  • Barbaulds Prophecy And Blakes Imagination - 1,136 words
    Barbauld's Prophecy And Blake's Imagination Barbauld's Prophecy and Blake's Imagination The Romantic Era was a time of widespread cultural, social, and political reform. Industrialization was taking the place of the agrarian lifestyle, which introduced problems such as higher poverty, a larger segregation of class, and overworking of both adults and children. The wars in America and France paved the way for political upheaval by introducing new ways of thinking and radicals who wanted change. With all of this turmoil and chaos many writers turned to escapism, which involved both imagination, and prophecy. Imagination and prophecy are merely two ways the writers of this time thought, hence, b ...
    Related: imagination, prophecy, william blake, works cited, western world
  • Buddhism In America - 1,475 words
    Buddhism In America The stresses and intensity of modern American society have influenced many people to adopt and adapt the principles of Buddhism and other Eastern religions. Some recent statistics from the US department of Health and Human Services show that 75% of the General Population experiences at least "some stress" every two weeks (National Health Interview Survey). Half of those experience moderate or high levels of stress during the same two-week period. It is common knowledge that stress can lead to heart disease, high blood pressure, strokes, and other illnesses in many individuals. Stress also contributes to the development of alcoholism, obesity, suicide, drug addiction, ciga ...
    Related: america, buddhism, jack kerouac, human evolution, freely
  • Buddhist Wisdom - 1,121 words
    Buddhist Wisdom Throughout history people have wondered about the universe in which we live in and looked for a purpose of our existence. Many Western philosophers believed that an individual is a separate entity from every other individual and nature. In the Buddhist belief however, there is no separation between you and any other person or animal. The goal of living and dying is to eventually see the world as it actually is instead of the illusion that we see with our senses. This state of enlightenment is known as Nirvana. To reach Nirvana it is necessary to give up attachments to the things of this world, see the interconnectedness of everything, and clear your mind so that you can see t ...
    Related: buddhist, wisdom, the prince, different aspects, hermann
  • Cancer In Detail - 1,070 words
    Cancer In Detail Discuss social, ethical and biological issues associated with cancer Cancer is one of the most complex and devastating diseases that claim the life of many humans. Today there are one in three people worldwide who are affected by cancer, and almost 60% of these people will almost certainly die. 7000 New Zealanders die every year from this disease. It is the second largest killer next to heart disease. Cancer does not just affect certain groups of people, it can affect anybody and it is not just one disease, it refers to more than a hundred diseases. Cancer is caused by carcinogens. At present, hundreds of chemicals are known to induce cancer. Normally, the bodys cells divide ...
    Related: breast cancer, cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer
  • Capital Punishment Just Or Unjust - 1,871 words
    Capital Punishment; Just Or Unjust Kevin Kearney C. M. V. (RELS 1502) March 29, 2001 Research Paper Capital Punishment: Fair or Unfair The most severe form of punishment of all legal sentences is that of death. This is referred to as the death penalty, or "capital punishment"; this is the most severe form of corporal punishment, requiring law enforcement officers to actually kill the offender. It has been banned in numerous countries, in the United States, however an earlier move to eliminate capital punishment has now been reversed and more and more states are resorting to capital punishment for such serious offenses namely murder. "Lex talionis", mentioned by the Bible encourages "An eye f ...
    Related: capital punishment, corporal punishment, criminal punishment, punishment, unjust
  • Celebrated Cases Of Judge Dee - 629 words
    Celebrated Cases Of Judge Dee Sung Yon Kim Asian Civilization Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee In by reading the Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee, I gained a perspective of the people and culture of China. This book showed the analysis of Chinese saw and the background of Chinese history. Judge Dee, during the Tang Dynasty, was a well-known statesman and a magistrate to a town called Chang-Ping. He was known to be a famous detective, in which he could solve all crimes. In the Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee, he is faced with three murders, which develop throughout the book. First of the three murders was the murder of the two silk merchants. Second was the sudden death of a young husband, and thirdl ...
    Related: forensic science, book reports, compare and contrast, luck, clever
  • Chagnon Debate - 739 words
    Chagnon Debate Confucian Doctrine in Modern Society Robert Bruce's article titled "The Return to Confucius?" asserts that Confucianism may be the answer to Asian economic strife. However, he fails to draw a clear link between economic prosperity and Confucianism, instead leaving the reader to hypothesize using the information given in the article, and, in our case, the Analects. I believe the message he is trying to convey is that a nation living in harmony is an economically prosperous one. This he supports with references to imperial China such as Matteo Ricci who, as Bruce states, "brought a vision of harmony, equality, scholarship and education, which the Enlightenment of Europe regarded ...
    Related: chagnon, debate, global economy, modern society, repressed
  • Changing Divorce Laws - 1,989 words
    Changing Divorce Laws In 1995, Statistics Canada data shows that 30% of marriages split (McGovern). Since the 1960's, marriage and divorce have been undergoing profound changes which have altered the meaning of marriage, the chances of its ending in divorce and the circumstances attached to marriage. These changes have made it easier for couples to obtain a divorce due to the changing laws and changing morals of society. The changes include three new grounds needed to prove marital breakdown, such as your spouse committing adultery, your spouse causing mental or physical cruelty or a separation of a year it was previously three years. Divorce also impacts the family as a whole, not only the ...
    Related: after divorce, divorce, divorce laws, divorce rate, free press
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