Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: weight loss

  • 138 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Food, Nutrition And Weight Loss - 526 words
    Food, Nutrition And Weight Loss Human beings require food to grow, reproduce, and maintain good health. Without food, our bodies could not stay warm, build or repair tissue, or maintain a heartbeat. Eating the right foods can help us avoid certain diseases or recover faster when illness occurs. These and other important functions are fueled by chemical substances in our food called nutrients. Nutrients are classified as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water. Although humans need food to survive, many people eat too much, or choose the wrong foods to eat, which leads to the body putting on weight. When you eat more calories than your daily energy requirements the extra ...
    Related: good nutrition, lose weight, nutrition, weight loss, vitamin supplements
  • Weight Loss - 1,048 words
    Weight Loss About one-third of Americans are extremely over-weight, which may be why crash dieting is beginning to plague America. It's estimated that Americans alone spend 80-100 billion dollars on weight loss tactics. People go on these diets to get quick results but are these results hurting them more than helping? The answer is Yes! The only way to safely and effectively lose weight is through old-fashioned exercise and the right diet. You cannot successfully lose weight by simply cutting food from your diet or taking some pills, it is necessary to work for your results. Without depriving your body of necessary nutrients through dieting, you can lose fat and get the body you've always dr ...
    Related: lose weight, weight loss, eating disorders, adolescent girls, nutrition
  • Weight Loss - 1,076 words
    ... ximately one-third of anorexics become bulimia nervosa's. These are people who binge eat then purge themselves by vomiting. They become isolated and depressed and have a low self-esteem. What's worse though is that physically these people seem healthy but if you look close they develop finger calluses or lesions, puffy cheeks , and erosion of enamel on their teeth due to the stomach acids so frequently eating away at it. It is in everyone's best interest to avoid dieting and the other methods of losing weight that come with it because there is a major difference between dieting and having a healthy diet (food choice). To overcome these weight problems and lead a healthier life you need l ...
    Related: lose weight, weight loss, dairy products, associated press, cheese
  • Weight Loss Dieting - 874 words
    Weight Loss Dieting Safe weight loss can only truly be achieved by a careful diet and exercise. For years there have been hundreds of gimmicks ranging from pills, soaps, drinks, and unconventional diet plans. Desperate to lose weight, people invest hundreds of dollars each year to gimmicks and diet plans that do not work. Although some of these products do produce temporary results, they are not always safe and the lost weight normally comes back. It is proven that the only way to lose weight and keep it off is by a healthy diet and exercise. One out of every three Americans is overweight. The most common reason for being overweight is a sedentary lifestyle, a life style of little activity, ...
    Related: body weight, dieting, lose weight, weight loss, eating habits
  • 1968 Life - 1,242 words
    1968 Life Analysis of Life for 1968 The year 1968 was a time of war, civil rights movements, and riots. Many big events took place during 1968. Many lives were changed by these events. Out if the 1960s, 1968 stands out the most. In January of 1968 the United States thought that the Vietnam War was coming to a close, but President Johnson made a statement that changed the direction of Vietnam. President Johnson said the South Vietnamese could not win. This caused the South Vietnamese could not win. This caused the South Vietnamese to launch the Tet Offensive. This shocked the United States, and caused the war to linger on for several more years. The Tet Offensive spread from the cities of Mek ...
    Related: life magazine, thornton wilder, popular music, summer olympics, entertainment
  • A Review Of The Eat More Weigh Less Hawaii Diet - 645 words
    A Review Of The Eat More Weigh Less Hawaii Diet A Review of The Eat More, Weigh Less, Hawaii Diet The Eat More, Weigh Less, Hawaii Diet claims that you can eat all the food you want, never have that feeling of hunger, still lose weight, and be healthier than you ever have been simply by eating the traditional foods of Hawaiians. The Eat More, Weigh Less, Hawaii Diet was developed by Dr. Shintani at the Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center in Hawaii. He treated native Hawaiians with diseases such as obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and other serious diseases, by merely altering their diets to traditional Hawaiian food instead of the junk food they had been consuming. In only three wee ...
    Related: diet, hawaii, lose weight, american journal, journal
  • Aids - 1,564 words
    Aids Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! AIDS "Somewhere among the million children who go to New York's publicly financed schools is a seven-year-old child suffering from AIDS. A special health and education panel had decided, on the strength of the guidelines issued by the federal Centers for Disease Control, that the child would be no danger to his classmates. Yet, when the school year started on September 9th, several thousand parents in two school districts in the borough of Queens kept their children at home. Fear of plague can be as pernicious, and contagious, as the plague itself(Fear of dying 1)." This article was written in 1985. Since then much has been fou ...
    Related: aids, aids hiv, social class, blood transfusion, matchmaker
  • Aids - 1,103 words
    Aids Aids Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), suppresses the immune system related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A person infected with HIV gradually loses immune function along with certain immune cells called CD4 T-lymphocytes or CD4 T-cells, causing the infected person to become vulnerable to pneumonia, fungus infections, and other common ailments. With the loss of immune function, a clinical syndrome (a group of various illnesses that together characterize a disease) develops over time and eventually results in death due to opportunistic infections (infections by organisms that do not normally cause disease except in people whose immune systems have be ...
    Related: aids, deficiency syndrome, human immunodeficiency, acquired immune, bacterial
  • Aids - 1,140 words
    ... f the mouth by the fungus Candida Albicans, is common in the early symptomatic phase of AIDS. Other infectious fungi include species of the genus Cryptococcus, a major cause of Meningitis in up to 13 percent of people with AIDS. Also, infection by the fungus Histoplasma Capsulatum affects up to 10 percent of people with AIDS, causing general weight loss, fever, and respiratory complications or severe central nervous system complications if the infection reaches the brain. Viral opportunistic infections, especially with members of the Herpes virus family, are common in people with AIDS. One Herpes family member, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), infects the retina of the eye and can result in blindn ...
    Related: aids, blood cells, nervous system, human cells, nose
  • Aids - 1,146 words
    AIDS Being one of the most fatal viruses in the nation, AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) is now a serious public health concern in most major U.S. cities and in countries worldwide. Since 1986 there have been impressive advances in understanding of the AIDS virus, its mechanisms, and its routes of transmission. Even though researchers have put in countless hours, and millions of dollars it has not led to a drug that can cure infection with the virus or to a vaccine that can prevent it. With AIDS being the leading cause of death among adults, individuals are now taking more precautions with sexual intercourse, and medical facilities are screening blood more thoroughly. Even though HI ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, latin america, hepatitis b, pneumonia
  • Aids - 1,410 words
    Aids Aids by sean ross How is HIV Diagnosed? You can get tested for HIV in a number of locations -- including public clinics, AIDS organizations, physicians' offices, and hospitals. Many locations give the test for free. You can choose between anonymous tests, in which you do not give your name to the HealthCare provider, or confidential tests, in which you do give your name. Test sites should provide trained counselors who can offer you support and guidance, no matter what the test result.(Balch-97) An HIV test looks for the antibodies your immune system creates in response to the virus. These antibodies may not appear in your blood until three to six months after HIV infection. Therefore, ...
    Related: aids, aids hiv, aids research, disease control, santa monica
  • Aids - 1,443 words
    AIDS Gonzales 1 The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was first discovered in 1981 as a unique and newly recognized infection of the body's immune system (Mellors 3). The name AIDS was formally know as GRIDS (Gay Related Immune Defiance Syndrome). The first case of AIDS was discovered in Los Angeles, where scientists from the CDC (Center for Disease Control) were called in on a half dozen cases. The CDC was convinced what they were seeing was a new strand of virus. None of the staff members had ever seen a strand of virus that could do so much destruction to the immune system like this one did. Many theories about this disease were in question. Many scientists believed it originated ...
    Related: aids, aids hiv, president clinton, health organization, sample
  • Aids In Detail - 2,050 words
    AIDS In Detail Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Today, despite the continuing production of better antibiotics since the discovery of penicillin, we are facing an infectious disease against which all these drugs are virtually powerless. This disease is spreading inexorably, killing more people and more people each year. AIDS does not know no national boundaries and does not discriminate by race or sex. It is rampaging not only throughout the United States, but also through Africa, India, China, Russia, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean countries. Even infants and children are at risk. AIDS is similar to the bubonic plague or the "BLACK DEATH" that killed perhaps one-third in ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, infectious disease, human immunodeficiency, purple
  • Alcohol Is The Intoxicating Part Of Beer, Wine And Liquorsthe Part That Causes Drunkenness It Is Formed During Fermentation, - 1,051 words
    Alcohol is the intoxicating part of beer, wine and liquors-the part that causes drunkenness. It is formed during fermentation, the process that creates the alcohlolicbeverage. When sugars from the fruits or grains are combined with yeast and water, alcohol results. Alcohol is a drug and, like all drugs, it has an effect on a persons body and mind. Because drinking alcoholic beverages makes some people feel more alive and more outgoing, alcohol is sometimes seen as a stimulant. But in fact it is a depressant, and slows down the central nervous system, of which the brain is a part. Small amounts of alcohol can affect a persons coordination and judgment. Drinking a large amount of alcohol at on ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol consumption, alcohol syndrome, blood alcohol, drink alcohol, drunkenness, fetal alcohol
  • Alternative Approaches To The Treatment Of Diabetes - 1,617 words
    Alternative Approaches To The Treatment Of Diabetes Alternative Approaches to the Treatment of Diabetes Diabetes is a general term for a disease caused by defective carbohydrate metabolism and characterized by abnormally large amounts of sugar in the blood and urine. Diabetes is usually classified into two types. Type I or insulin-dependent diabetes, formerly called juvenile-onset, usually occurs in children and young adults; and, Type II, or non-insulin dependent diabetes (formerly called adult-onset diabetes) is found in persons over 40 years old and progresses slowly (Funk and Wagnalls 183). Diabetes is considered a group of disorders with multiple causes, rather than a single disorder. T ...
    Related: alternative approaches, approaches, dependent diabetes, diabetes, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes
  • Anerexia Nervosa - 769 words
    Anerexia Nervosa ANOREXIA NERVOSA In this paper, we will be describing a crucial disorder that affects many teenagers. This disorder is Anorexia Nervosa, better known as Anorexia. Anorexia Nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by constant dieting, rapid weight loss and the feeling of being to fat during weight loss. Most anorexics are women and teenage girls, who see their self as being overweight even though they are deathly underweight. The term "Anorexia Nervosa" means loss of appetite due to nerves, but the people with anorexia do not actually lose their appetite until the late stages of their starvation. Until then they just do feel hungry but they will not eat. There are numerous ...
    Related: anorexia nervosa, nervosa, social changes, family therapy, starvation
  • Aneurysms - 476 words
    Aneurysms By definition, an aneurysm is swelling of the blood vessel. They commonly occur in an artery or vein after a heart attack. An aneurysm can cause a blood clot, which can lead to major damage to the heart and brain. Identifying an aneurysm is very difficult. There are very little symptoms that can be detected. The symptoms change depending on where the artery is located:  A Thoracic aneurysm produces a dry cough; pain in the chest neck, back and abdomen. The pain may be sudden and sharp.  Abdominal aneurysm produces back pain, appetite and weight loss, and a pulsating mass in the abdomen.  Aneurysm in a leg artery causes poor circulation in the leg, with weakn ...
    Related: older people, congestive heart failure, heart failure, sudden, vessel
  • Anorexia - 670 words
    Anorexia In today's society, we often hear of people who suffer daily from illnesses such as cancer, AIDS, obsessive-compulsive disorder, phobias, tuberculosis, downs syndrome and many other types of illness both communicable and non-communicable. What about the illness that consumes the life of over eight million Americans, 90% being women? "Anorexia nervosa, in medicine a condition characterized by intense fear of gaining weight or becoming obese, as well as a distorted body image, leading to an excessive weight loss from restricting food intake and excessive exercise. Anorexia nervosa is not associated with any preexisting physical illness. It is found chiefly in adolescents, especially y ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, obsessive compulsive disorder, sports medicine, distorted
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 674 words
    Anorexia Nervosa What is anorexia nervosa? Anorexia nervosa is an illness that usually occurs in teenage girls, but it can also occur in boys. People with anorexia are obsessed with being thin. They lose a lot of weight. They are terrified of gaining weight. They believe they are fat even though they are very thin. Anorexia isn't just a problem with food or weight. It's an attempt to use food and weight to deal with emotional problems. What is the difference between anorexia and bulimia? People with anorexia starve themselves, avoid high-calorie foods and exercise constantly. People with bulimia eat huge amounts of food, but they throw up soon after eating, or take laxatives or diuretics (wa ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, more successful, early stages
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,281 words
    ... r parents and teachers no longer sustain her. She is unable to acknowledge her sexual desires and may regard her developing woman's body as an alien invasion. Her fear of adult femininity may also be a fear of becoming like her mother. According to this theory, fasting restores a sense of order to her life by allowing her to exert control over herself and others. She is proud of her ability to lose weight, and self-imposed rules about food are a substitute for genuine independence. Some students of anorexia believe that these girls starve themselves to suppress or control feelings of emotional emptiness. They struggle for perfection to prove that they need not depend on others to tell th ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, grolier multimedia encyclopedia, young woman
  • 138 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>