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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: webster dictionary

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  • Abortion: Prolife - 499 words
    Abortion: Pro-life! Free Swiss Anti-Wrinkle Cream. You Won't Believe Your Eyes! Abortion: Pro-life! Every day, an overwhelming amount of human beings lives are terminated. The culprit: unwanted pregnancies. Many woman are (not by choice), becoming pregnant as a result of unsafe sex, rape, and other things. So what is one to do when they discover that theyre pregnant? They have some alternatives: (1) have the child and raise it (2) have the child, then give it up for adoption (3) get an abortion. Sadly, many women choose alternative three, unaware of what theyre getting themselves into. Abortion is very cruel to the baby and even harms the mother. It is murder! There are many different proced ...
    Related: first trimester, webster dictionary, nervous system, partial, spinal
  • Absolutism And Relativism - 1,251 words
    Absolutism And Relativism Absolutism and relativism are two extreme ethical approaches to reality. While they are both valid and supported by facts, they are very contrasting in their views. Values are what a person cares about and thinks is worthwhile. For example, values can include life, love, religious faith, freedom, relationships, health, justice, education, family and many other things. Usually these values are what provides the passion in a person's life, and gives them hope and a reason for being. A person might go to any lengths to protect what they feel is right and to preserve these values. Values can be divided up into two subcategories: absolute and relative. Absolute values de ...
    Related: absolutism, relativism, john stuart mill, more important, fundamental
  • Abstract - 1,735 words
    ... Abstract Television violence is pure evil to the minds of children and young adults. A simple cartoon can probably have around thirty violent acts in it. A sit-com show can influence a kid to kill someone. Magazines and newspapers have articles of children imitating violent acts that they have seen on television. Psychologists and doctors have done a lot research to prove that television violence can affect a mind of a child or a young adult. Scientists did weird and educated experiments to show that television violence can affect minds of children and young adults. Parents had discovered ways to prevent television violence from entering their homes. Parents also found way to let their ...
    Related: abstract, webster dictionary, human brain, television shows, watches
  • Aggressive Behavior - 1,312 words
    Aggressive Behavior Aggression is a behavioral characteristic that refers to forceful actions or procedures (such a deliberate attack) with intentions to dominate or master. It tends to be hostile, injurious, or destructive, and is often motivated by frustration (The Merriam-Webster Dictionary, 1995). For an individual, aggressive behavior is considered understandable and normal under appropriate circumstances, but when it is frequent, intense, lasting, and pervasive, it is more likely to be a symptom of a mental disorder. Likewise, aggression between groups, can be in the form of healthy competition, but can become harmful when unfair or unjust disadvantage or frustration is perceived, lead ...
    Related: abnormal behavior, aggressive, aggressive behavior, behavioral therapy, social norms
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,012 words
    ... igestive enzymes, which can irritate the stomach wall, producing heartburn, nausea, gastritis, and ulcers. The stomach of a chronic drinker loses the ability to adequately move food and expel it into the duodenum, leaving some food always in the stomach, causing sluggish digestion and vomiting. Alcohol may also inflame the small and large intestine (Overview 4). Moderate daily drinking may be good for the heart, but for many the risks outweigh the benefits. Even one binge may produce irregular heartbeats, and an alcohol abuser experience increased risk of high blood pressure, heart attacks, heart arrhythmia, and heart disease. Alcohol may cause cardiomyopathy (a disease of the heart musc ...
    Related: alcoholism, consumption, drinking, heart disease, heavily, legal drinking
  • Anarchy - 1,645 words
    Anarchy Anarchism seems to be defined many ways by many different sources. Most dictionary definitions define anarchism as the absence of government. A leading modern dictionary, Webster's Third International Dictionary, defines anarchism briefly but accurately as, "a political theory opposed to all forms of government and governmental restraint and advocating voluntary cooperation and free association of individuals and groups in order to satisfy their needs." Other dictionaries describe anarchism with similar definitions. The Britannica-Webster dictionary defines the word anarchism as, "a political theory that holds all government authority to be unnecessary and undesirable and advocates a ...
    Related: anarchy, william godwin, working class, utopian society, empower
  • Euthanaisa - 1,254 words
    Euthanaisa Euthanasia Euthanasia is, according to Webster dictionary, the act of killing an individual for the reason of mercy. This paper will examen the issue of active and passive euthanasia. Active euthanasia is an intervention that would cause death to take place when it would not otherwise happen. Passive euthanasia is the decision to withold help from an individual, ultimately leading to the death of the individual. This paper is supposed to deal with the circumstances, if any, that euthanasia, active or passive, would be morally permissible. Before I build the wall of moral delineation between these two scenarios, consider that they are but two possible choices on a broad continuum o ...
    Related: morally acceptable, natural process, webster dictionary, intervene, morally
  • Gambling Disease - 1,058 words
    Gambling Disease In the US today, as gambling is becoming more popular so are gambling addicts. As the states institute legalized gambling, their income increases dramatically. Compulsive gambling needs to be recognized and medically treated before it is too late for the gambler. The only way to treat the disease of compulsive gambling is absence from gambling. Therefore, compulsive gambling must be considered and uncontrollable disease. According to the Merriam Webster Dictionary, compulsive means an irresistible (uncontrollable) impulse (Mish 166). A disease is defined as being an abnormal bodily condition that impairs functioning and can usually be recognized by signs and symptoms. Uncont ...
    Related: compulsive gambling, gambling, gambling addiction, legalized gambling, pathological gambling
  • Hitler And Stalin: The Rise To Power - 1,850 words
    Hitler and Stalin: the rise to power During the period leading up to World War II, there were two men who were on opposing sides, yet had many traits that made them much alike. One of these men was someone whos name is instantly recognizable to almost anyone today--Adolf Hitler. The other man was a major player in world history as well, but his name is not so infamous--Joseph Stalin. These men were each triumphant in their rise to power in their countries and they were very comparable in the ways that they succeeded. Their success was mostly attributed to their new ideas and, especially in Hitlers case, their politics. Although Hitler and Stalin hated each other, the two leaders were similar ...
    Related: adolf hitler, hitler, communist party, world history, aspiration
  • It All Begins With Attitude - 2,804 words
    It All Begins With Attitude IT ALL BEGINS WITH ATTITUDE from the seminar BREAKING THROUGH LIFE'S BOUNDARIES by Pat Spithill Seminar Leader * Author * Keynote Speaker (C) Copyright, 1989, Pat Spithill P.O. Box 505 * Hutchins, Texas 75141 214-225-8051 This material may not be reproduced or altered without written permission of the author and copyright holder. The Importance of Attitude The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines the word "attitude" as "a mental position or feeling with regard to an object." The mental positions or feelings are our thoughts, beliefs and opinions. The object is life. In other words, attitudes encompass all of the thoughts, beliefs and opinions which people have about ...
    Related: positive attitude, webster dictionary, people change, went wrong, complaining
  • Juvenile Delinquency - 1,442 words
    Juvenile Delinquency Juvenile Delinquency 4 The current statistics of juvenile delinquency are astounding. I will look at the most recent statistics and a few of the programs implemented to reduce or prevent delinquency. Before delving to deep into juvenile delinquency it is important to consider the definitions of "juvenile" and "delinquent". The Merriam-Webster Dictionary gives two definitions of "juvenile": 1. Showing incomplete development, and 2. A young person; one below the legally established age of adulthood (1997). Merriam-Webster defines "delinquent" as: offending by neglect or violation of duty or law (1997). As a complete definition of juvenile delinquent it is safe to repeat "a ...
    Related: delinquency, juvenile, juvenile court, juvenile crime, juvenile delinquency, juvenile delinquents, juvenile offenders
  • Juvenile Delinquency - 1,394 words
    ... s a few important questions. What is being done to prevent this? And what are our governments (local and federally) doing to help? Money makes the world go round and without government help the many social workers, psychologists, counselors and doctors trying to help this situation would not be able to do their part. The juvenile justice system is funded by multiple sources (McNeece & Roberts, 1997). Almost no federal money is expended by juvenile courts to support ongoing operations, but demonstration projects are funded with grants from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This appears to be changing som ...
    Related: delinquency, delinquency prevention, juvenile, juvenile crime, juvenile delinquency, juvenile detention, juvenile justice
  • Legalizing Drugs - 1,872 words
    Legalizing Drugs Lindsey Greene English 102 September 23, 2001 "Drugs- something and often an illegal substance that causes addiction, habituation, or a marked change in consciousness." - Merriam-Webster Dictionary Just close your eyes for a minute and picture what the world would be like if drugs were legal. Would you be for it or against it? Just think, you could get drugs anywhere you wanted. You would not have to worry about getting in trouble with the law. You could get as many as you wanted and have a supply and variety of whatever you wished for. Would this be a good thing or a bad thing? The three sources: Traffic, Legalizing Drugs Make Matters Worse, and Legalization Madness all has ...
    Related: drug problem, drugs, legalize drugs, legalizing, legalizing drugs
  • Measuring Wellbeing - 598 words
    Measuring Well-Being MEASURING ECONOMIC WELL-BEING By using Gross Domestic Product as the main indicator of well-being, many important factors are neglected. As defined in the New Merriam-Webster Dictionary, well-being is the state of being happy, healthy, or prosperous (1989, p.831). Economically, perhaps the only relevant state under the definition is prosperity, but in reality happiness and health have a great impact on well-being, significant enough to be recognized even when focusing mainly on wealth in numbers. If society hopes to have a more accurate and complete indication of well-being, globally or nationally, a new system of measurement must be developed, leaving GDP to its origina ...
    Related: measuring, wellbeing, merriam webster, ultimate cause, volunteer
  • Modern Era - 765 words
    Modern Era Alan Catic (CPO #119) History 262 - History of Civilization II Professor Jim Halverson May 12, 2000 FINAL EXAM The modern era began with the Enlightenment of the eighteenth century and accelerated through the first half of the twentieth century. Although this span of time included many dissenting voices, in general it could be described as an Age of Scientific Reason. The premodern classicists of Greece, Rome, and the Middle Ages, of course, developed reason, to dizzying heights. Science had its origins among Bible-believing Christians of the seventeenth century. But the scientific reason of modernism excluded on principle everything that could not be seen, measured, and empirical ...
    Related: twentieth century, world countries, international business, nato, science
  • Philosophy Hume - 1,900 words
    Philosophy - Hume In explaining Humes critique of the belief in miracles, we must first understand the definition of a miracle. The Webster Dictionary defines a miracle as: a supernatural event regarded as to define action, one of the acts worked by Christ which revealed his divinity an extremely remarkable achievement or event, an unexpected piece of luck. Therefore, a miracle is based on ones perception of past experiences, what everyone sees. It is based on a individuals own reality, and the faith in which he/she believes in, it is based on interior events such as what we are taught, and exterior events, such as what we hear or see first hand. When studying Humes view of a miracle, he int ...
    Related: hume, philosophy, religious texts, common sense, sudden
  • Pollution - 456 words
    Pollution Pollution. What is pollution? According to the Merriam Webster Dictionary pollution is the action of polluting esp. by environmental contamination with man-made waste. The United States runs on power. Much of the United States powers come from various nuclear power plants all across the country. Some power plants are getting old and are not up to date. These power plants are emitting various gasses and chemicals into the air. Transcendentalists believe that people should coexist with nature. They believe that nature is an entity of equal importance to us, and not just our supply of resources. The problem is that the gasses and other pollutants released are harming our environment. ...
    Related: pollution, human race, nuclear power, power plants, transcendental
  • Proxemics - 1,146 words
    Proxemics Spacial Relations Spacial relations is a complex subject that can be interpreted in many different ways. A clear explanation of spatial relations is easily understood with the study of proxemics. So what is proxemics? Well the term proxemics came from E.T. Hall, a researcher in 1963. Proxemics is the study of the nature, degree, and effect of the spatial separation individuals naturally maintain (as in various social and interpersonal situations) and of how this separation relates to environmental and cultural factors. Proxemics is made up of featured spaces: fixed space, semi-fixed, and informal. Space around a person is set up into zones representing comfort and non-comfort. Fixe ...
    Related: proxemics, social anxiety, prentice hall, cross cultural, furniture
  • Racism - 1,234 words
    Racism Racism is defined by the Webster Dictionary as the assumption that the characteristics and abilities of an individual are determined by race and that one race is biologically superior to another. Confronted with a problem as complex as racism, we cannot afford to let ourselves be constrained by the boundaries of specific disciplines. Racism is alive and well. The reports of its demise are totally unfounded so that we come to the beginning of the twenty-first century, it remains as our society's major dilemma. There is a lot at stake when dealing with this issue, but that fact is that we cannot brush it aside or ignore it any longer because it is present in everything we do. Canada and ...
    Related: racism, catholic religion, urban institute, hiring process, equality
  • Relativism - 307 words
    Relativism Webster Dictionary describes relativism as a view that ethical truths depend on the individuals and groups holding them. The United States has the idea that they have the right to stick their noses into other countries business because something else is morally wrong. But cultures vary greatly regarding what is morally right and wrong. Quotes related to relativism saturate prime time dramas like Roswell, and Dawsons Creek. Roswell is a semi drama on the WB Wednesday nights. The main characters of Roswell are Max, Liz, Michael and Isabel. In this episode it says, "Of coarse its got to be the right one. You know how you know this, the kiss that's how." In this quote an alien hunter, ...
    Related: relativism, webster dictionary, acted, television
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