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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: black music

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  • A Dangerous Game Of Love - 1,307 words
    A Dangerous Game Of Love Would you like to play a game? This game involves passion, deceit, lies, and love. I viewed two movies that share the same painful theme; Cruel Intentions and Dangerous Liaisons. They both bring to life a set of characters that play with emotions like they are nothing but a mere child's game. I chose to introduce you to the infamous Viconte Valmont and the spoiled Sebastian Valmont. Not only are their names similar, but so were their motives. I liked Sebastian more because of his clench on reality. He portrayed a villain well, but at the same time proved that he too could have feelings. Viconte had feelings also, but it was much harder for him to reveal it. I felt a ...
    Related: dangerous game, true love, social issues, early baroque, reserve
  • Beginning Of House Music - 1,254 words
    Beginning Of House Music Early House To trace the origins of todays house music, one needs to time travel back to the 80s, following a bizarre trail that spans the Atlantic ocean, hits the Mediterranean dance floors of Ibiza, sneak into the backdoors of New Yorks recording studios, and have V.I.P. passes to the clubs of Chicago and London. Since we cant deliver any of that, heres a brief retelling of the birth of modern dance music. House musics earliest roots are found in the musical hotspots of Chicago around 1985. Transplanted New York DJ Frankie Knuckles had a regular gig at a club called The Warehouse. Knuckles would tinker with soul and disco tunes by laying down a drum machine-generat ...
    Related: black music, dance music, music, time travel, modern dance
  • Culture And Music Of The 70s - 1,285 words
    ... groups continued to produce songs that highly promoted the idea of peace and joy throughout the world. A common song for peace that was found in the times was "I'd Like to Teach the World To Sing (In Perfect Harmony)" by The New Seekers. The songs lyrics ring of the themes love and peace. "I'd like to build the world a home, and furnish it with love," is an example of the topic and theme the song was trying to portray. "And hear them echo through the hills "Ah, peace throughout the land," is a direct relation to The New Seekers feelings of the rising war scene in Vietnam. As the theme of peace became so obvious throughout the nation many other groups also composed songs that dealt with ...
    Related: black music, music, music lovers, great artists, first person
  • Evolution Of Rap Music - 2,575 words
    ... Signed: THE EVOLUTION OF RAP MUSIC Rap is a form of urban music, which emerged from the hip-hop movement of the South Bronx, New York, in the early 1970s. The hip-hop culture was comprised of the popular street activities of African-American youth during the 1970s such as: styles of language, street-slang colloquialisms, graffiti, break dancing, music and their colourful attitude and fashion. Rap music is therefor a subculture to the hip-hop movement, or what many describe as the soundtrack to accompany the other facets of the hip-hop culture . This means that any changes that take place within the hip-hop culture itself will be reflected in the subculture of rap music. Since the 1970s ...
    Related: black music, evolution, music, rap music, illustrated history
  • Impact Of Music - 1,651 words
    Impact Of Music Fifteen people died on April 20th 1999. Two misunderstood teens went to school and killed 12 people and then themselves(Manson). On October 6th, 1998 a man was beaten, robbed and left tied to a fence. He died 6 days later(Boston). Both of these cases are a focus for something that no one would ever think could cause such harm. Music. Both of these have a focus of music and the negative impact that it has on the youth. Music is a way to express your self, an outlet for emotions and personal issues. It is also a place to force ideas and opinions on a mass of thousands. People can relate to it on many different levels. But who should be responsible for the actions it provokes? S ...
    Related: black music, music, music studies, negative impact, university medical center
  • Langston Hughes - 1,459 words
    Langston Hughes Langston Hughes was one of the first black men to express the spirit of blues and jazz into words. An African American Hughes became a well known poet, novelist, journalist, and playwright. Because his father emigrated to Mexico and his mother was often away, Hughes was brought up in Lawrence, Kansas, by his grandmother Mary Langston. Her second husband (Hughes's grandfather) was a fierce abolitionist. She helped Hughes to see the cause of social justice. As a lonely child Hughes turned to reading and writing, publishing his first poems while in high school in Cleveland, Ohio. In 1921 he entered Columbia University, but left after an unhappy year. Even as he worked as a deliv ...
    Related: hughes, langston, langston hughes, great migration, kansas city
  • Langston Hughes: A Poet Supreme - 1,197 words
    Langston Hughes: A Poet Supreme Langston Hughes: A Poet Supreme Black poetry is poetry that (1) is grounded in the black experience; (2) utilizes black music as a structural or emulative model; and (3) consciously transforms the prevailing standards of poetry through and inconoclastic and innovative use of language. No poet better carries the mantle of model and innovator the Langston Hughes, the prolific Duke Ellington of black poetry. Hughes's output alone is staggering. During his lifetime, he published over eight hundred poems. Moreover, he single-handedly defined blues poetry and is arguably the first major jazz poet. Early in his career he realized the importance of reading his poetry ...
    Related: black poet, langston, langston hughes, poet, american poetry
  • Rock Roots - 608 words
    Rock Roots Rock Roots: Africa and Cuba - a synthesis between 2 traditions & 2 continents to form rock - rock is the unique tribute to the power of integration - upon closer inspection, rock appears to be a purely African addition to the western musical institution - Afro-Cuban + black music of Mississippi and Louisiana share common ancestry: in the early 19th C. the Haitan revolution sent the islands plantation owners packing. Many managed to escape with their African slaves , whose origins were primarily from Yoruba + Fon, modern Nigeria, Congo and Guinea. Most of these slaves ended up in either Cuba, found in the Oriente province or in the southern United States, pricipally in LA but also ...
    Related: rock, robert johnson, black music, american music, funk
  • Soul Music As A Vehicle Of Social Expression - 1,618 words
    Soul Music As A Vehicle Of Social Expression Music is the most powerful vehicle of human expression. As the embodiment of love, disapproval, happiness, experience life, music speaks to us, because it comes from us. Each people, in each paradine of the human experience instinctively and systematically change the music of the past to represent the realities of the present. In this century, black music, more specifically Soul music, has been that music that has brought to plain view that which evidences our humanity hope, hurt, joy and passion in such a way that the world has no other choice than to feel its power and marvel in its brilliance. When one discusses the relationship between Soul ...
    Related: black music, music, social change, social injustice, social problems, vehicle
  • The People, Leisure, And Cultures Of Blacks During The Harlem Renaissance - 2,481 words
    The People, Leisure, And Cultures Of Blacks During The Harlem Renaissance The People, Leisure, and Culture of Blacks During the Harlem Renaissance It seems unfair that the pages of our history books or even the lecturers in majority of classrooms speak very little of the accomplishments of blacks. They speak very little of a period within black history in which many of the greatest musicians, writers, painters, and influential paragon' emerged. This significant period in time was known as the Harlem Renaissance. Blacks attained the opportunity to work at upper-class jobs, own their own homes, and establish status among themselves. To no ones surprise, they still were not accepted into the so ...
    Related: black african, black american, black experience, black history, black music, black nationalist, black people
  • Understanding Jazz - 1,548 words
    Understanding Jazz Understanding Jazz A mellow vibration lingers throughout a smoke-filled room, as eloquent music escapes the callused fingers of relaxed musicians. The tempo speeds up and grows into a fusion of spontaneous and uneven chords, exploding with rhythmic soul and life. The sound of jazz embraces the room. Jazz is primarily a dazzling, spellbinding, introspective beauty. The musician and the listener find they can derive meaning from the music. The music exists first, and its meaning is defined later. When a jazz musician is improvising, he is spontaneously composing, and at that moment his music is completely subjective. He must imagine the future in his music. He cannot transce ...
    Related: jazz, african american music, white america, the bluest eye, chicago
  • West And Torgovnick - 961 words
    West And Torgovnick West and Torgovnick: Manichean Ideologies Both Cornel West and Marianna De Marco Torgovnick discuss the idea of supremacy, Manichean theologies, and authoritarian behavior in their essays. However, they deal with these ideas differently and for different reasons. In Wests essay, Malcolm X and Black Rage, he explains Mal colm Xs views on how to transfer black rage in such a way that it would reject supremacy. In Torgovnicks essay, On Being White, Female, and Born in Bensonhurst, she writes how her hometown held supremacist ideas and how this af fected her. West is still pursuing the goal of black free dom by looking into the past, especially Malcolm Xs writ ings. Whereas, ...
    Related: black music, different ways, italian americans, suspicious, reject
  • Writers Of The Harlem Renaissance - 1,160 words
    ... re of the Harlem writers, and black nationalism swept the Harlem culture. Magazines such as Opportunity and The Crisis endorsed black political forums and addressed voting issues in the African American community. Religion was also a theme in writings of the time, due to the fact that many writers came from devout religious backgrounds. Countee Cullen's work, as in "Yet I Do Marvel," often questions whether or not God is "good, well-meaning, kind" (Cullen 267). James Weldon Johnson also treats religious themes in God's Trombones, where he explores the preaching of southern black preachers. Lastly, feminism found its way into the writings of the Harlem Renaissance, as female writers such ...
    Related: american writers, harlem, harlem renaissance, renaissance, toni morrison
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