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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: waste disposal

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  • A Introduction - 1,012 words
    ... shing areas were forced to close due to effects from increased river nutrients. Also, real estate values can be affected by high-density farming. If the residents near a farm can perceive an unpleasant odor, the value of their land may be reduced. Besides disagreeing about the level and extent of regulatory reform, people disagree about the level of technology that is necessary to treat livestock waste safely. Some say that when used properly, current waste treatment methods are adequate. Others say that livestock operators need to adopt new waste treatment technologies. The Sierra Clubs Holman would like livestock operations to use more advanced treatments such as those used for human w ...
    Related: senate bill, policy makers, environmental standards, occurring, prevention
  • Air Pollution - 1,546 words
    Air Pollution Air Pollution is addition of harmful substances to the atmosphere resulting in damage to the environment, human health, and quality of life. One of many forms of pollution, air pollution occurs inside homes, schools, and offices; in cities; across continents; and even globally. Air pollution makes people sick, it causes breathing problems and promotes cancer, and it harms plants, animals, and the ecosystems in which they live. Some air pollutants return to earth in the form of acid rain and snow, which corrode statues and buildings, damage crops and forests, and make lakes and streams unsuitable for fish and other plant and animal life. Pollution is changing the earth's atmosph ...
    Related: air pollution, pollution, greenhouse gases, global scale, burn
  • Composting And The Grocery Industry The Following Bulletin Was Prepared From Grocery Industry Committee On Solid Waste Octobe - 1,202 words
    COMPOSTING AND THE GROCERY INDUSTRY The following bulletin was prepared from Grocery Industry Committee on Solid Waste October 24, 1991 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Solid waste composting is an important component of an integrated solution for solid waste management. Composting can divert organic, compostable materials, not otherwise recycled, from the solid waste stream and convert them into a useful product. Composting is environmentally sound, technically and economically feasible and meets local waste management needs. This report, from the Grocery Compost Task Force to the Grocery Industry Committee on Solid Waste (GICSW), is intended to establish composting as a viable and sustainable component o ...
    Related: bulletin, committee, composting, grocery, municipal solid waste, solid, solid waste
  • Composting And The Grocery Industry The Following Bulletin Was Prepared From Grocery Industry Committee On Solid Waste Octobe - 1,181 words
    ... rs and retailers implement a list of specific action items as soon as possible in order to promote grocery industry composting. Composting is an important emerging solid waste management method that holds great promise for grocery manufacturers, retailers and communitites. As the cost of disposal spirals upward, and the economics of composting improve, composting is becoming an increasingly cost-effective means of controlling waste expenses. Composting is also a more environmentally responsible option than landfilling and grocery customers are constantly raising their level of expectations in favor of this kind of environmentally responsible behavior. This report should facilitate the su ...
    Related: bulletin, committee, composting, grocery, grocery stores, municipal solid waste, solid
  • Creating The Safest Classroom And Lab Atmosphere - 1,703 words
    Creating the Safest Classroom and Lab Atmosphere The Findings of the Legal/Safety Group After being dubbed the legal group, Chris, John, Jen, Jens, and Spencer began thinking about what this title meant. After talking about the meaning of our group, both to each other and to professor Sidebotham, it was concluded that the semantics behind legal formed the following definition. Le' gal: Pertaining to safety, i.e. anything that will keep Cooper Union out of legal trouble. We worked from there, and researched Uniform Building Code literature, OSHA manuals, and literature regarding the development of labs for chemical and biological use, as well as literature on the disposal of created waste. Th ...
    Related: atmosphere, classroom, cooper union, total area, facility
  • Eartquakes - 1,496 words
    Eartquakes Earthquakes: Why They Occur And How To Prepare For Them An earthquake is one of the most powerful natural disasters known to man. Earthquakes are so powerful that they can knock down buildings and bridges as well as change river routes and cause landslides. With all the damage earthquakes cause the only way to protect oneself from them is to be prepared and well educated about them. Since they cannot be predicted one must always be prepared for them. Strict building codes in earthquake prone areas also help to minimize the property damage caused during an earthquake. Earthquakes throughout history have caused several millions of deaths as well as severe property damage. Earthquake ...
    Related: natural disaster, microsoft encarta, water supply, radio, portable
  • Environmental Justice And The Epa - 401 words
    Environmental Justice and the E.P.A. Environmental justice has slowly gained consciousness of the American people, from racial events in the 1960s and 1970s to the confrontation of this issue by national environmental leaders. It became a real issue, with true roots and a real name, in North Carolina's Warren County in 1982. National black leaders were protesting what they called an unfair siting of a waste facility -- in a depressed area. Benjamin Chavis, Jr., defined environmental justice as "racial discrimination in environmental policymaking, enforcement of regulations and laws, and targeting of communities of color for toxic waste disposal and siting of polluting industries." This defin ...
    Related: environmental, environmental protection, environmental protection agency, national environmental, waste disposal
  • Federalism Poverty - 1,974 words
    Federalism & Poverty Many Americans believe that the federal government is too big, both in the number of agencies it directs and in the scope of its powers. Some people also think that the daily business of Capitol Hill has no effect on their lives, in part because they believe that politicians do not understand their problems. This dissatisfaction with Washington, D.C., in recent years has renewed debate over the division of power between federal and state and local governments. Federalism - the sharing of power between the states and the national government - has been a major issue throughout U.S. history. Thomas R. Dye defines federalism as "a division of power between two separate autho ...
    Related: federalism, new federalism, poverty, republican party, great society
  • Flood Plain Ethics: The Conflicts Between Utilitarianism And Aldo Leopold's Land Ethics - 802 words
    Flood Plain Ethics: The Conflicts Between Utilitarianism And Aldo Leopold'S Land Ethics This paper will discuss the conflicts between the utilitarian ethical theory and the ethical theory put forth by Aldo Leopold known as The Land Ethic. The question chosen to express the philosophical differences central in the two theories is, what should we do with flood plain land use? The land use issue in general requires careful consideration. The flood plain land use issue illustrates the utilitarian and Aldo Leopold's Land Ethic philosophical conflicts. Utilitarianism derives from: 1) Actions which result in the greatest good for the greatest number of people. 2) Promote efficiency by comparing act ...
    Related: aldo, aldo leopold, ethics, flood, human ethics, plain, utilitarianism
  • Global Warming - 616 words
    Global Warming English 101 October 31, 1998 Global Warming Global Warming is an important ecological issue because it has several negative effects upon our environment. Global Warming, or what has been called the Greenhouse effect, is the result of a fourfold ecological process. 1-Sunlight radiates from the sun, through space, to Earth's atmosphere. 2- The sunlight enters the atmosphere and hits Earth. Some of it turns into heat energy in the form of infrared light. The heat gets absorbed by surrounding air and land, which in turn makes it warm. 3- Infrared rays, that are remitted into the atmosphere are trapped by greenhouse gases. 4- The gas then absorbs the light and is remitted back to t ...
    Related: global warming, warming, greenhouse effect, intergovernmental panel, infrared
  • Global Warming - 776 words
    Global Warming Global Warming, aside from pollution is one of scientists biggest concerns. Global Warming is caused by the Greenhouse effect. There are 4 steps in the Greenhouse effect. 1-Sunlight radiates from the sun, through space, to Earths atmosphere. 2- The sunlight enters the atmosphere and hits Earth. Some of it turns into heat energy in the form of infrared light. The heat gets absorbed by surrounding air and land, which in turn makes it warm. 3- Infrared rays, that are remitted into the atmosphere are trapped by greenhouse gases. 4- The gas then absorbs the light and is remitted back to the Earths surface and warms it even more. Some of the naturally occurring greenhouse gases are ...
    Related: global warming, stop global, warming, over time, greenhouse gases
  • Globalization And Sustainability - 1,589 words
    Globalization And Sustainability The world was once vast and unknown. Communication was once dreaded as messages would take exceeded amounts of time from one point of destination to the next. Countries would not know of each others affairs for months because the world was large beyond anyones imagination. But as soon as technology reared its head the world rapidly became smaller. It modified everything within its grasp. Communication that once took months could now take seconds. Travelling abroad that would have taken years now took hours. Every institution that fell into this form of globalisation changed. It is obvious to see that governments have also been effected by globalisation in suc ...
    Related: globalization, sustainability, foreign investment, world market, unemployment
  • God Existence Question - 1,831 words
    ... ible for God's existence--their own selves. Consider, for example, the human body. It is composed of 30+ different kinds of cells, totaling over `100 trillion' cells when all added together to make up the human adult.. These cells come in all different sizes and shapes, with different functions and life expectancies. For example, some cells (e.g., male spermatozoa) are so small that 20,000 would fit inside a capital "O" from a standard typewriter, each being only 1/20th mm long. Some cells, put end-to-end, would make only one inch if 6,000 were assembled together. Yet all the cells of the human body, if set end- to-end, would encircle the earth over 200 times. Even the largest cell of th ...
    Related: existence of god, god's existence, the bible, white blood cells, mathematical
  • Introduction - 1,119 words
    Introduction Air pollution is nothing new. Ever since the discovery of fire, less-than-desirable substances have been vented into the air. One of the first air-pollution regulations dates back to the fourteenth century, when King Edward I banned the burning of sea coal in lime kilns. U.S. air-pollution regulations have their roots in British Common Law. But regardless of those efforts, air pollution continues to be a serious local and world-wide problem. Pollution is the pressure within the air of one or more substances that are harmful to human health, welfare, animal or plant life, or property. In the past with air pollution we included mainly the outdoor pollutants, although in recent yea ...
    Related: electric utilities, melting point, boiling point, combine, contributor
  • Livestock Disease And African Food Security - 1,299 words
    Livestock Disease And African Food Security Livestock Disease and African Food Security A serious problem in Africa today is the emergence of rampant, deadly strains of disease that are affecting livestock and ravaging populations of pigs and cattle in many African nations, putting food security at risk in many populations of various nations. With already major food scarcity issues among many emerging African nations, disease will only further pressure an already dire situation for food security in Africa. Livestock play important roles in farming systems, which provide primarily food and income, which is necessary for food security. Nearly 12 percent of the world populations rely solely on ...
    Related: african, african nations, food production, food security, livestock, security issues
  • Murder Commiting - 1,169 words
    Murder Commiting The problem with committing murder is the high risk of being caught. When you decide that murder is justified, the problem of how to do it and how to avoid being found out are your first thoughts. Unfortunately, the police have become very sophisticated in their investigating skills. Very few murderers get away with it, until now that is. There are ways to fool the police and the coroner's office. If more people knew how to blow up a car with Drano, or cause a massive heart attack without any physical signs of foul play, there would be a lot more unsolved or unexplained deaths in which many life insurance policies would be paid without question. In my experience, the method ...
    Related: personal experience, court room, waste disposal, mistake, justified
  • Nafta - 1,855 words
    Nafta NAFTA North American Free Trade Agreement NAFTA's proponents promised benefits for the U.S., Canada and Mexico. Benefits such as new U.S. jobs, higher wages in Mexico, a growing U.S. trade surplus with Mexico, environmental clean-up and improved health along the borderall have failed to take form. It is commonly believed that free trade between nations is a mutually beneficial arrangement for all parties involved; indeed, this is held to be an absolute truth. Though free trade is undoubtedly the most effective form of commerce between countries from a purely economic standpoint, increasingly we find that our so-called free trade agreements are horribly unbalanced. Indicative of these f ...
    Related: nafta, department of labor, job creation, high school, inexperienced
  • Nafta - 1,298 words
    NAFTA On January 1, 1994, Canada, Mexico and the United States passed the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Promoted to Congress by the Clinton administration, with the assurance that it would give rise to more jobs - exactly how many though, is not precisely known. Yet, according to the Journal of Commerce, the U.S. went from having a $5.5 billion trade surplus with Mexico before NAFTA, to having a massive $16 billion trade deficit today. At the same time, it is estimated that 400,000 Americans have lost manufacturing jobs because of NAFTA within the treaty's first three years, that's about the same number of jobs which have been created in the Mexican maquiladoras. Instead of sh ...
    Related: nafta, trade area, waste disposal, business planning, liberalization
  • Nuclear Energy - 2,438 words
    ... uld then conclude that the nuclear industry is mostly to blame for the nation wide increase of cancers and deaths. Is the nuclear industry really benefitting the nation or is it just making the world into a radioactive dump which takes thousands of years to clean up? One last major problem with nuclear energy that needs to be touched on is the storage of nuclear waste. Nuclear waste includes all contaminated parts that have had contact with any source of nuclear energy and all products of a nuclear reaction that was discussed at the beginning of the paper. There are several problems that relate to the storage of nuclear energy. At a nuclear storage facility, there are security officers, ...
    Related: atomic energy, nuclear, nuclear disaster, nuclear energy, nuclear physics, nuclear power, nuclear waste
  • Oxygen - 1,067 words
    ... bon dioxide from the blood into the lungs and the breathing out of air), constitutes only one phase of respiration. A second phase of it is the transportation of oxygen by the blood from the lungs to the tissues and of carbon dioxide from the tissues to the lungs. A third phase is the absorption (passage by diffusion) of oxygen into the tissue cells and tissue use of oxygen (the oxidative and other respiratory processes with in the tissues cells whereby energy is liberated). External respiration involves the exchange of gases between the circulation blood and the air. For this exchange to take place, a person needs a large moist surface where air and blood can come in close contact. The ...
    Related: oxygen, atomic weight, atomic number, addison wesley, hunger
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