Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: warfare

  • 471 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Aids Conspricay Is Aids Biological Warfare - 3,107 words
    Aids Conspricay - Is AIDS Biological Warfare? Refinance now homeowner even if you have bad credit. 185 loc Aids Conspricay - Is AIDS Biological Warfare? The following is a complete verbatim transcription from a recent broadcast of "Network 23", a program shown on a local Los Angeles Public Access Cable Channel. Good evening, I'm Michel Kassett. This is Network 23. A couple of weeks ago we had a program on the subject of AIDS, addressing the question of whether AIDS-the AIDS virus-was created by the government; and I'm sure that some people were quite shocked by what they heard. We spent that entire program relating to you the evidence of a very substantial amount of factual evidence which su ...
    Related: aids, aids research, biological, biological warfare, warfare
  • Chemical Biological Warfare - 920 words
    Chemical & Biological Warfare Ever since the beginning of time people have used tools, which were later called weapons. People have used weapons to defend his or her life, family, property, prosperity, country, and even his honor. Over the years weapons have improved greatly and people are still trying to make them even better. In earlier times when man started using weapons they were made of stones, sticks, fire, or whatever was available to them. Now, the weapons I speak of weren't as harmful and deadly as the weapons of today, but as the old story goes, David did kill the giant Goliath with a sling-shot and a stone. These weapons could still kill someone if they didn't receive the proper ...
    Related: biological, biological warfare, biological weapons, chemical weapons, warfare
  • Chemical Warfare - 1,170 words
    Chemical Warfare Is the World in Danger of A chemical Warfare? Hell is a place on earth and it is located 2300 miles south of Moscow in the middle of the Aral Sea. Its name is Vokroshdeniye Island. In English this means Renaissance Island. Renaissance Island was a Soviet Union biochemical test sight before its fall in 1990. They where testing such things as small pox, the plague, and most importantly anthrax. The Islands main mission was to develop a strain of the diseases that could be put into the warheads of SS-18 an intercontinental bolistic missile, to be pointed at American cities. The thought targets are New York, Seattle, Chicago, and Boston. Renaissance Island officials did open air ...
    Related: chemical warfare, warfare, cold war, side effects, transferred
  • Chemical Warfare - 1,064 words
    ... which can lead to pneumonia, is very fast spreading, and can lead to respiratory distress, contracts it. It can be lethal. Death can occur in less than 48 hours from the time of infection. Inhalation anthrax however is very rare and there is a vaccination available. According to Health Answers, Symptoms include:  Fever  General Discomfort, uneasiness, or ill feeling (malaise)  Headaches  Shortness of breath  Cough  Congestion of the nose and throat  Pneumonia  Joint Stiffness  Joint pain Signs and tests:  Blood culture is positive for anthrax  Chest x-ray  Serologic test for anthrax  ...
    Related: chemical warfare, warfare, distress syndrome, drug administration, infected
  • Chemical Warfare - 1,216 words
    Chemical Warfare Chemical Warfare In this report I will be giving a history of chemical warfare. I will also be showing a chart that includes the Agent, and many other useful information about nerve gas agents which are the main item for chemical warfare. This report will also include the effects of nerve gas on the human body. Chemical Warfare is an extremely dangerous form of warfare. An inquisitive scientist accidentally stumbled upon the engineering of nerve gas agents in the 30s by the name of Gerhard Schrader. He was working on a solution to the troublesome insects in Germany when he stumbled onto a solution for a larger problemhumans. With World War II less than a decade later the Ger ...
    Related: chemical engineering, chemical warfare, chemical weapons, warfare, human body
  • Commercial Warfare - 816 words
    Commercial Warfare In the presidency of Thomas Jefferson, continuing through Madison's term, the United States initiated a policy to retaliate against the seizure of ships by the British and French. These three dominant nations entered a period between 1806-1810, known as Commercial Warfare. The Commercial War was a response by Americans to maintain their right of neutral commerce. The Acts by the United States, the Decrees by the powerful Napoleon I, and the Parliamentary orders, throughout the period of Commercial Warfare directly led to the start of the War of 1812, and helped build the commercial future of the United States. The Peace of Amiens did not last long after it's signing on Mar ...
    Related: commercial, warfare, united states trade, war of 1812, america
  • Medieval Warfare - 830 words
    Medieval Warfare Medieval Warfare Medieval warfare was very brutal. They would gather their men. Who could be anyone from a footman to a knight. To me I think I might have wanted to be a knight so I could use the horses weight and speed to mow down people that I went against. The battles were fierce and with large numbers. The person that had the most people usually won the battle. Most battles were fought over land. Or feuds that two people had. After the battle the winning side would loot and plunder if it was not their land. Most injuries were usually fatal. They were usually fatal because of diseases that would get them. Other causes are because they would get stabbed in the stomach in t ...
    Related: medieval, medieval warfare, warfare, large numbers, strategic planning
  • Mustard Gas Is A Group Of Chemical Compounds Used In Chemical Warfare, So Called Because Of Its Mustardlike Smell Mustard Gas - 476 words
    Mustard Gas is a group of chemical compounds used in chemical warfare, so called because of its mustard-like smell. Mustard gas contains carbon, hydrogen, and chlorine, with either sulfur or nitrogen. When it comes in contact with skin, mustard gas causes severe blisters. Clothing can be worn to protect the skin, but breathing it produces extreme damage to the lungs and other internal tissues. These compounds are particularly harmful to moist areas of the human body, such as the eyes, armpits, and groin, and concentrated exposure may be fatal. Mustard gas is generally a solid or liquid, but can also be sprayed as an aerosol. Modern gas warfare began during World War I (1914-1918). In April 1 ...
    Related: chemical warfare, mustard, mustard gas, smell, human body
  • Spartan Warfare - 271 words
    Spartan Warfare In the 7th Century BC a new era of warfare strategy evolved. Before this new strategy, foot soldiers engaged in battle in the form of one mob for an army. Then on the command of their generals they would run at each other and proceed to hack blindly at the enemy in front of them with little or no objective other than to kill him. This proved to be very messy and the victor of battle depended mostly on emotion and size of these mobs. In the name of strategy and organization, the phalanx was developed. A phalanx is simply defined as a line formation with its width significantly larger then its depth. The depth of the phalanx is a variable which some suggest was decided by the a ...
    Related: warfare, alexander the great, objective, width
  • Spartan Warfare Sparta In The 7th Century Bc A New Era Of Warfare Strategy Evolved Before This New Strategy, Foot Soldiers Kn - 1,228 words
    Spartan Warfare Sparta In the 7th Century BC a new era of warfare strategy evolved. Before this new strategy, foot soldiers (known as hoplites) engaged in battle in the form of one mob for each army which on the command of their generals runs at each other and proceeds to hack blindly at the enemy with little to no direction other then to kill the enemy in front of them. This proved to be very messy and the tide of battle depended mostly on emotion and size of an army. In the name of strategy and organization, the phalanx was developed. A phalanx is simply defined as a line formation with its width significantly larger then its depth. The depth of the phalanx is a variable which some suggest ...
    Related: foot, military strategy, modern warfare, sparta, strategy, warfare
  • Submarine Warfare - 1,198 words
    Submarine Warfare Submarine Warfare The First "World War," also known as the Great War, took place after the turn of the century from 1914 to 1918, and was named this because it was the first conflict of global proportions. The war resulted in the loss of military lives and the near destruction of Europe. The massive destruction of the war was largely a result of the use of technology in warfare. The use of technology in warfare was a result of the industrial revolution at the end of the nineteenth century which brought mechanization and mass production to society. This brought the use of things never used or heard of into the war and included airplanes, submarines, and tanks, as well as rad ...
    Related: submarine, warfare, nineteenth century, first battle, target
  • The Development And Control Of Chemical And Biological Warfare - 1,121 words
    The Development and Control of Chemical and Biological Warfare In the year 600 BC. Solon who was a legislator of the Athenians, contaminated the River Pleisthenes with "skunk cabbage" to give the defenders of Kirrha violent diseases leading to their defeat. This is the first recorded use of plants as a source of chemicals for warfare. Although not very well known, chemical and biological warfare has been used for over 2000 years. "Chemical and Biological warfare has made a huge change since 600 BC and has changed into one of the most advanced and destructive types of warfare known to man." "There are many reason why chemical and biological warfare is so effective. Throughout the medieval tim ...
    Related: biological, biological and chemical weapons, biological warfare, biological weapons, chemical warfare, chemical weapons, disease control
  • The Strengths And Weaknesses Of Joint Warfare - 765 words
    The Strengths And Weaknesses Of Joint Warfare The Strengths and Weaknesses of Joint Warfare Armed with numerous studies, and intensive public hearings, Congress mandated far-reaching changes in DOD organization and responsibilities in the Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986. This landmark legislation significantly expanded the authority and responsibility of the chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff. Included in this expanded authority and responsibility was the requirement for the chairman to develop a doctrine for the joint employment of armed forces. As operations Urgent Fury, Just Cause, and Desert Storm have vividly demonstrated, the realities of armed conflict ...
    Related: joint, joint chiefs of staff, warfare, weaknesses, armed conflict
  • Trench Warfare - 1,067 words
    Trench Warfare World War I was a military conflict that lasted from 1914 to 1918. It was a modern war with airplanes, machine guns, and tanks. However, the commanders often fought World War I as if it were a 19th Century war. They would march their troops across open land into the face of machine guns and often slaughter. As a result of this action, a tactic known as trench warfare was implemented. The most recent use of use of trench warfare, before World War I, took place during the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). This war attracted worldwide attention among military authorities that were interested in studying the latest technology used in war. Many viewed trench warfare to be an effectiv ...
    Related: trench warfare, warfare, russo-japanese war, different types, involving
  • Warfare - 922 words
    Warfare From the beginning of time we have all seen things grow and evolve to bigger and better things. Take the t.v. for example. This magnificent invention has evolved from being black and white, to high definition color, surround sound, and can fit in your pants pocket no problem. Other creations in life have evolved as well, especially in the art of warfare. Today with the push of a single button entire countries are able to be destroyed. The accuracy and efficiency of the guns in this era are mind boggling. Deadly weapons are now the size of a hand and can be carried nearly everywhere without being noticed. This is just a glimpse at todays warfare technology. Back in the day, when men w ...
    Related: warfare, long distance, king henry, french army, bigger
  • 100 Years Of Solitude - 917 words
    100 Years Of Solitude 100 Years of Solitude Just as Edmund Spenser believes in the ever-whirling wheel of Change; that which all mortal things doth sway, so too does Gabriel Garca Mrquez. In One Hundred Years of Solitude, Colonel Aureliano Buenda experiences life and the changes which accompany it. Spenser views human life as a constant change from one stage to another. The change may be either good or bad; but one thing is certain, change is inevitable. Colonel Buenda is a dynamic character who transforms from an idealistic leader into an increasingly cynical and corrupt man. Toward the end of his life, he isolates himself from the rest of the world. In the beginning of Aurelianos career, h ...
    Related: one hundred years of solitude, solitude, book reports, edmund spenser, surviving
  • 16th Century English Weapons - 1,456 words
    16th Century English Weapons 16th Century English Weapons During the 16th century England and much of Europe found itself in turmoil and in a constant state of war. The outbreak of fighting led to the invention and development of new weapons and the growth and change of weapons of old. The development of weapons was a trademark of the time, with a sort of renaissance, or re-birth in the field of weaponry (Miller). The technology was highlighted by the invention of gunpowder by the Chinese which eventually found its way to England (Grolier). However, the use of gunpowder was minimal, because the use of had yet to be perfected. The technological advancement most useful during the period was pr ...
    Related: century england, weapons, more effective, technological advancement, tactic
  • A Comparison Of Judaism, Islam, Christianity - 1,589 words
    ... from their homes. Much persecution of Jews by Christians has been justified by the belief that the Jews were responsible for the death of Christ. In Nazi Germany and after the fall of the Third Reich, many Germans said that even though what happened to the Jews of Europe during World War Two was horrible, they did bring it on themselves because they were responsible for the death of Jesus. The Christian/Muslim conflicts began during the seventh century CE, with the fall of the Byzantine cities in Egypt and the Holy Land within ten years of the death of Muhammad. "Europeans watched in horror as the Holy Lands became Muslim and the "infidel" advanced into Spain" (Fisher, p.382). This Euro ...
    Related: christianity, comparison, great western, human beings, dependence
  • A Comparsion Between Modern Day Soilders And Medieval Knights - 448 words
    A Comparsion Between Modern Day Soilders And Medieval Knights In Medieval Times, A Knight was a mounted man-at-arms of medieval Europe. He served a king or other feudal superior, usually in return for the tenure of a tract of land, but sometimes he served his lord for money. The knight was generally a man of noble birth who had served in the lower ranks as page and squire before being ceremoniously inducted into knighthood by his superior. At his induction the knight usually swore to be brave, loyal, and courteous and to protect the defenseless. After the 15th century, knighthood was conferred on civilians as a reward for public services. A knight in armor would present a very strange appear ...
    Related: knights, medieval, medieval europe, medieval times, modern warfare, the knight
  • A Loyalist And His Life - 1,490 words
    A Loyalist And His Life The called me M.J., that stood for Michael Jones. It was the early part of April in 1760 when I departed an English port and headed across the waters for the North American colonies where I planned to settle, start a family, and begin what I hoped to be a very prosperous life. It was the summer if 1760 when I planted my feet and my heart in Boston along with several black slaves that I purchased when I arrived here. I brought a hefty 10,000 British pounds in my purse, which was my entire life savings. I was twenty-two years old, turning twenty-three in the fall. I had heard so many wonderful things about this place and I could not wait to get here. When I first arrive ...
    Related: common sense, north american, american colonies, atlantic, personally
  • 471 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>