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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: war of the worlds

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  • An Indepth Look At Hg Wells - 1,395 words
    An Indepth Look At H.G. Wells Herbert George Wells was born on September 21, 1866 in Bromley, England, the last of four children. His mother was a house cleaner and his father was a shopkeeper. When he was eight years old, he broke his leg, spent a lot of time reading, and discovered an intense interest in books. At the age of thirteen, his father was injured in an accident so Wells had to leave school and work for a draper. He hated this work and managed to change his employment by working for his uncle and becoming a part-time tutor. This gave him the opportunity to continue his studies in his free time. He finally won a scholarship to The Normal School of Science in London. He worked as a ...
    Related: h. g. wells, jules verne, world war i, modern science, novelist
  • An Indepth Look At Hg Wells - 1,349 words
    ... sion by the Martians, who arrived from their planet in ten cylinders at 20-4-hour intervals to devastate the whole country and destroy London. The War of the Worlds impressed its readers because England was constantly being scared by the thought of possible invasions by France or Germany. The English were becoming concerned about how prepared they were to resist attack from other powers. The scientific background is plausible. People had long believed that Mars might be populated. Astronomers supported the theory that the planet was drawing farther away from the sun and therefore getting colder. Wells suggests in The War of the Worlds that the Martians would look for a warmer climate lik ...
    Related: h. g. wells, science fiction, western world, first edition, warning
  • Causes Of World War I With Relationship To Current Conflicts - 1,269 words
    Causes Of World War I With Relationship To Current Conflicts As the war of the worlds collide between the more democratic Allies and the orthodox Central powers, there were numerous causes to the war in which they can be summed up into the - isms of modern analysis. In the 19th, 20th, and even the 21st century, almost all of the conflicts can be categorized in either one or a combination of those - isms. Nationalism and Extreme Nationalism One of the causes of World War I can be linked to the use of extreme nationalism. An easily abused method, nationalism proved worthy of a war during the Napoleonic Era. Extreme nationalism was one of the causes of World War I because of the unification of ...
    Related: current debate, world today, world war i, british navy, arms race
  • First World War - 1,234 words
    First World War The First World War began as a spark and exploded into a merciless blood bath of money, power, and land. The little spark began in the mountainous Balkans of southeastern Europe where small state-sized nations argued back and forth. For hundreds of years many of these small nations were held under the gripping powers of Turkey, Russia, and Austria-Hungary. It started in the capital of Bosnia, Sarajevo. Bosnia was also a mini-nation of the Austria-Hungary Empire. On the day of June twenty-eight, 1914, the leader of Austria-Hungary and his wife were visiting the city. Shots rang out from a young Slavic nationalist heading for the two. They were both killed. This person lived in ...
    Related: first world, world war i, german colonies, austria hungary, payback
  • Herbert George Wells - 1,032 words
    Herbert George Wells One of the most prolific writers of his time, H.G. ( Herbert George) Wells was able to do it all. He was universal, and could write from many different sides. He was one of the most versitile writers, as he could write like a novelist, as in the The History of Mr. Polly. He could also write short stories, like The Star, or The Door In The Wall. He was also considered to be a visionary and a dreamer, as shown throughout A Modern Utopia, and Men Like Gods. What Wells was most famous for was his ability to be a scientific romancer. His novels, The Time Machine, The War of The Worlds, and The Invisible Man, were what he became most widely known for. All his writings, in the ...
    Related: h. g. wells, herbert, invisible man, middle class, catherine
  • Herbert George Wells - 1,067 words
    Herbert George Wells In History, many writers have tried to touch on stories of science fiction, but were not too successful. One man though, by the name of Herbert George Wells has been considered by some to be the father of modern science fiction.(GeoCities.com) H.G. Wells as some may call him, have had various books, and stories that has made him very famous in the great book world around the nation, as far as modern science fiction goes. Wells best know books include, " The Time Machine", "The Invisible Man", "The War of the Worlds and "The Island Of Dr. Moreau." Out of 100 Books Wells wrote fifty of them were top sellers across the United States and many parts of the world. Many Critics ...
    Related: h. g. wells, herbert, middle class, invisible man, drama
  • Herbert George Wells - 1,024 words
    ... rse and for that it made Wells story seem so interesting and come to life. Stories he wrote he intended to grab the reader and make them believe what they are reading and what the whole suspense of the stories would be all about. Wells was a great writer because of how he did his work he didnt just go right into the suspense he just tip toed you into the excitement of the story which made it so great for his writing to be put together. Well's skills of science helped him extend his imagination towards his writing many people said that the science may have not been accurate, but the adventure towards the philosophy in those books makes Wells early science fiction books fascinating and exc ...
    Related: h. g. wells, herbert, french author, war of the worlds, shortly
  • Herbert George Wells - 1,064 words
    Herbert George Wells In History, many writers have tried to touch on stories of science fiction, but were not too successful. One man though, by the name of Herbert George Wells has been considered by some to be the father of modern science fiction.(GeoCities.com) H.G. Wells as some may call him, have had various books, and stories that has made him very famous in the great book world around the nation, as far as modern science fiction goes. Wells best know books include, The Time Machine, The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds and The Island Of Dr. Moreau. Out of 100 Books Wells wrote fifty of them were top sellers across the United States and many parts of the world. Many Critics seen W ...
    Related: h. g. wells, herbert, war of the worlds, private schools, crazy
  • Herbert George Wells - 1,026 words
    ... in the universe and for that it made Wells story seem so interesting and come to life. Stories he wrote he intended to grab the reader and make them believe what they are reading and what the whole suspense of the stories would be all about. Wells was a great writer because of how he did his work he didnt just go right into the suspense he just tip toed you into the excitement of the story which made it so great for his writing to be put together. Well's skills of science helped him extend his imagination towards his writing many people said that the science may have not been accurate, but the adventure towards the philosophy in those books makes Wells early science fiction books fascina ...
    Related: h. g. wells, herbert, war of the worlds, heart attack, outline
  • Hg Wells - 346 words
    HG Wells annon Herbert George Wells English author and political philosopher, most famous for his science-fantasy novels with their prophetic depictions of the triumphs of technology as well as the horrors of 20th-century warfare. Wells was born September 21, 1866, in Bromley, Kent, and educated at the Normal School of Science in London, to which he won a scholarship. He worked as a draper's apprentice, bookkeeper, tutor, and journalist until 1895, when he became a full- time writer. Wells's 10-year relationship with Rebecca West produced a son, Anthony West, in 1914. In the next 50 years he produced more than 80 books. His novel The Time Machine mingled science, adventure, and political com ...
    Related: women's rights, world leaders, invisible man, pessimistic, depicting
  • Homo Superior - 1,967 words
    Homo Superior? War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells Homo-Superior? War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells is a fiction story written about war and mankind's coming of age. It is also a philosophical novel with many deep meanings underlying the shallow looking one-hundred-eighty-eight page book. The subject of this novel is Science Fiction and there are not many that can even compete with Wells in terms of how superior his word descriptions are. He simply does wonders with the imagination of the reader. Obviously the whole book is about the struggle mankind faces, but it is not always with aliens, they are actually more of a good way to represent what Wells really believed. He believed man is dominant, y ...
    Related: homo, science fiction, war of the worlds, first person, ugly
  • Mockumentary - 1,039 words
    ... show how to skewer human pretensions without looking like you're stabbing the human spirit. To offer a realistic portrayal, mock documentaries borrow many of the tools that traditional documentary form uses to produce truth and rather, use them to produce fiction. The verite style is synonymous with both traditional and false documentary form to provide a sense of realistic camera work. In the verite style, the camera is handheld and shaky, lighting is uneven, sound quality is poor, and the acting is impeccable. This unprofessional look aids in the aura of believability. The Blair Witch Project is a recent example of a very successful use of the verite style. The credits provide the bac ...
    Related: human spirit, heavy metal, human life, subsequent, historically
  • The 1930s: The Good Times And The Bad Times - 1,414 words
    ... officials. Because of his ruthlessness, Clyde earned the title "public enemy number one of the Southwest." Frank Hamer, a former Texas Ranger, trailed Bonnie and Clyde across nine states before he was able to stage a deadly ambush outside Arcadia, Louisiana, in May 1934. Hamer and five other lawmen shot and killed Bonnie and Clyde as they drove through the ambush. Bonnie and Clyde were buried in separate cemeteries in Dallas, Texas.! The immense crackdown on crime in this decade ushered in a new era of good feelings, knowing that J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI were protecting them from the scum of the times. With the end of the depression and prohibition, the good times of the 30s began. Th ...
    Related: dark time, the monster, snow white, war of the worlds, crawford
  • The 1930s: The Good Times And The Bad Times - 1,414 words
    ... officials. Because of his ruthlessness, Clyde earned the title "public enemy number one of the Southwest." Frank Hamer, a former Texas Ranger, trailed Bonnie and Clyde across nine states before he was able to stage a deadly ambush outside Arcadia, Louisiana, in May 1934. Hamer and five other lawmen shot and killed Bonnie and Clyde as they drove through the ambush. Bonnie and Clyde were buried in separate cemeteries in Dallas, Texas.! The immense crackdown on crime in this decade ushered in a new era of good feelings, knowing that J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI were protecting them from the scum of the times. With the end of the depression and prohibition, the good times of the 30s began. Th ...
    Related: dark time, public enemy, dallas texas, popular art, petty
  • The 1930s: The Good Times And The Bad Times - 1,414 words
    ... officials. Because of his ruthlessness, Clyde earned the title "public enemy number one of the Southwest." Frank Hamer, a former Texas Ranger, trailed Bonnie and Clyde across nine states before he was able to stage a deadly ambush outside Arcadia, Louisiana, in May 1934. Hamer and five other lawmen shot and killed Bonnie and Clyde as they drove through the ambush. Bonnie and Clyde were buried in separate cemeteries in Dallas, Texas.! The immense crackdown on crime in this decade ushered in a new era of good feelings, knowing that J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI were protecting them from the scum of the times. With the end of the depression and prohibition, the good times of the 30s began. Th ...
    Related: dark time, howard hughes, warner brothers, popular art, sphere
  • Ufo Kinds - 3,432 words
    UFO Kinds Ever since US Air Force Pilot Kenneth Arnold coined the term Flying Saucer, on 24th June 1947, after allegedly encountering nine disk shaped objects while out flying over the Cascade Mountains, the world wide sightings of such objects, has increased logarithmically. By 1957 the furor over UFO sightings showed no sign of abating and the sightings had now been awarded levels of classification by US Astronomer, Allen. J. Hynek. Hynek created three categories for UFO encounters: Close encounters of the first kind: nocturnal lights, daylight disks, the second kind: Physical affects left by UFOs, marks on the ground, car engines stalling and finally close encounters of the third kind: th ...
    Related: york city, world wide, morning star, prophetic, electro
  • Virtual Reality: The Future Of Tomorrow - 1,054 words
    Virtual Reality: The Future Of Tomorrow Virtual Reality: The Future of Tomorrow Although some doubt the potential of virtual reality, the reality is our technologically dependent culture is making virtual reality a part of everyday life. Popular in video games, virtual reality allows the user to totally control a computerized character. Every action the user makes is imitated by the character and instantly displayed for the user. However, since the early 90's, the use of virtual reality has developed and taken the spotlight past evolving video games. Virtual reality has already made its mark on fields such as aviation, medicine, and even meteorology. Where is this new technology heading in t ...
    Related: tomorrow, virtual, virtual reality, wall street, british medical
  • Wells And Darwin - 1,701 words
    Wells And Darwin Herbert George Wells was born in Bromley, Kent, a suburb of London, to a lower-middle-class family. He attended London University and the Royal College of Science where he studied zoology. One of his professors instilled in him a belief in social as well as biological evolution which Wells later cited as the important and influential aspect of his education. This is how it all began. Maybe without this professor Wells wouldnt be the famous author he is today. Most of Wells novels are science fiction and have a great deal of some kind of human society theme, or Darwinism in mind. It is a theme that is seen in his most famous science fiction writings. H.G. Wells seems to conve ...
    Related: charles darwin, darwin, h. g. wells, london university, human race
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