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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: walt whitman

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  • Emily Dickinson And Walt Whitman - 448 words
    Emily Dickinson And Walt Whitman Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman are two of literatures greatest innovators, they each changed the face of American literature. they are also considered one of literatures greatest pair of opposites. Dickinson is a timid wreck loose. While Whitman was very open and sociable, Whitman shares the ideas of William Cullen Bryant, everyone and everything is somehow linked by a higher bond. Both Whitman and Dickinson were decades ahead of their time, sharing only the universality of their works. Whitmans works always express his feelings of equality towards all mankind "For every atom belonging to me as good to you"(Whitman 347). Whitman exemplifies the American val ...
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  • Leaves Of Grass By Walt Whitman - 1,536 words
    Leaves Of Grass By Walt Whitman In the twentieth century, the name Walt Whitman has been synonymous with poetry. Whitmans most celebrated work, Leaves of Grass, was the only book he ever wrote, and he took a lifetime to write it. A large assortment of poems, it is one of the most widely criticized works in literature, and one of the most loved works as well. Whitman was unmarried and childless, and it has been noted that Leaves of Grass consumed him greatly; James E. Miller Jr. writes: "...he guided his poetic offspring through an uncertain, hesitant childhood, a lusty young manhood, and a serene old age...it is difficult to write the life of Whitman without writing instead of the life and t ...
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  • On The Beach At Night Alone By Walt Whitman - 363 words
    On the Beach at Night Alone by Walt Whitman In On the Beach at Night Alone, Walt Whitman develops the idea that everyone has a connection with everything else, including nature. Whitman uses a variety of writing techniques to get his point across. First, the repetition and parallel structure that his poems contain reinforce the connection between everything in nature. The usage of All 11 times emphasizes the inclusion of everything in the universe. The sentence structure remains the same throughout the poem, without any drastic change; however, the length of the lines in the poem vary. In addition, Whitmans extravagance with his words further illustrates his idea of the Over-Soul. For exampl ...
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  • Walt Whitman - 516 words
    walt whitman A World of Politics Thesis: Walt Whitman was a man who used his thoughts on political issues concerning the Civil War within his writings because of many experiences he had encountered. Whenever ever the term political writing comes up, most people would think of Walt Whitman. Walt Whitman was one of the most popular political writers of all times. Nearly everyone agrees that Walt Whiman is America 's greatest poet (Unger 331). Whitman's ideas and attitudes were chiefly those of the Romantic Movement (Foerster 719). Some of Whitman's most popular writing were Leaves of Grass, A Song of Myself, and Drum-Taps. Leaves of Grass is a poem mostly concerning Whitman's childhood and mem ...
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  • Walt Whitman - 1,185 words
    Walt Whitman Walt Whitman Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819, in West Hills, Long Island, New York. He was the second of six children. From 1825-1830, he attended public school in Brooklyn. After his years of education, Walt Whitman experimented with many different jobs. From 1836-1838, Whitman taught at several schools in Long Island. After teaching, Walt Whitman returned to printing and editing in New York. During this time he edited many papers such as the Aurora (daily newspaper), Evening Tattler, Brooklyn Weekly Freeman, Brooklyn Daily Eagle and the Brooklyn Times. In addition to editing, he also wrote for the Long Island Star. From 1850-1854, Whitman owned and operated a printing of ...
    Related: walt, walt whitman, whitman, ralph waldo emerson, abraham lincoln
  • Walt Whitman - 1,765 words
    Walt Whitman In parting with traditional poetic formalities, Walt Whitman alleviated a burden that impeded his ability to achieve full poetic expression. To Whitman, the strict boundaries that formal meter, structure, and rhyme imposed set limits on his stylistic freedom. This is not to say that these limits prevented Whitman from conveying his themes. Rather, they presented a contradiction to which Whitman refused to conform. In Whitmans eyes, to meet these formal guidelines one would also have to sacrifice the ability to express qualities and passion of living men. Thus, Whitman contested traditional poetic protocol because it added a layer of superficiality that concerned itself with crea ...
    Related: walt, walt whitman, whitman, human spirit, american literature
  • Walt Whitman - 271 words
    Walt Whitman Whitman, Walt (1819-1892), American poet, whose work boldly asserts the worth of the individual and the oneness of all humanity. Whitman's defiant break with traditional poetic concerns and style exerted a major influence on American thought and literature. Born near Huntington, New York, Whitman was the second of a family of nine children. His father was a carpenter. The poet had a particularly close relationship with his mother. When Whitman was four years old, his family moved to Brooklyn, New York, where he attended public school for six years before being apprenticed to a printer. Two years later he went to New York City to work in printing shops. He returned to Long Island ...
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  • Walt Whitman - 271 words
    Walt Whitman Whitman, Walt (1819-1892), American poet, whose work boldly asserts the worth of the individual and the oneness of all humanity. Whitman's defiant break with traditional poetic concerns and style exerted a major influence on American thought and literature. Born near Huntington, New York, Whitman was the second of a family of nine children. His father was a carpenter. The poet had a particularly close relationship with his mother. When Whitman was four years old, his family moved to Brooklyn, New York, where he attended public school for six years before being apprenticed to a printer. Two years later he went to New York City to work in printing shops. He returned to Long Island ...
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  • Walt Whitman - 518 words
    Walt Whitman In my opinion the poet which best exemplifies modernism is Walt Whitman. Walt Whitmans stylistic preference is not exactly mine, but it is definitely a good example of modern poetry. He has broken down many walls of traditional poetry, using the style of long, free verse prose. In which he praises everything. It is impossible to talk about modern poetry without making any references to traditional poetry. It is not enough to say that Walt Whitman is a pioneer in modern poetry. We must explain what walls he and other poets have broken. When I speak of traditional poetry one name always comes to mind, that name is William Shakespeare. When I study Shakespeares work, especially his ...
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  • Walt Whitman Biography - 1,961 words
    Walt Whitman Biography Wonderful Causing Tears The ability to pinpoint the birth or beginning of the poet lifestyle is rare. It is rare for the observer as it is for the writer. The Walt Whitman poem Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking is looked at by most as just that. It is a documentation, of sorts, of his own paradigm shift. The realities of the world have therein matured his conceptual frameworks. In line 147 we read Now in a moment I know what I am for, I awake. This awakening is at the same time a death. The naivet of the speaker (I will assume Whitman) is destroyed. Through his summer long observation, the truths of life are born, or at least reinforced, in him. The obvious elements ...
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  • Walt Whitman Writings - 1,091 words
    Walt Whitman Writings Perhaps the most basic and essential function of poetry is to evoke a particular response in the reader. The poet, desiring to convey on emotion or inspiration, uses the imagination to create a structure that will properly communicate his state of mind. In essence he is attempting to bring himself and the reader closer, to establish a relationship. William Carlos Williams contends that "art gives the feeling of completion by revealing the oneness of experience" (194) This argument relies on the precept that art is reality is not nature or a reflection of nature but a completely original creation. And additionally, that art is holistic, where one can experience the whole ...
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  • Walt Whitman Writings - 1,094 words
    ... re, encompassing the whole through particulars. Williams writes, Whitman's proposals are of the same piece with the modern trend toward imaginative understanding of life. The largeness which he interprets as his identity with the least and the greatest about him, his "democracy" represents the vigor of his imaginative life. (199) In "Song of Myself" Whitman presents images of everyday life in America. Like Williams, he possesses an acute sense of the moment. Whitman perceives the external world and distinctly portrays it: "His glance is calm and commanding, he tosses the slouch of his hot away from his forehead,/The sun falls on his crispy hair and mustache, falls on the black of his pol ...
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  • Allen Ginsbergs Poetry - 1,698 words
    Allen Ginsberg's Poetry Themes and Values of the Beat Generation As Expressed in Allen Ginsberg's Poetry Perhaps one of the most well known authors of the Beat Generation is a man we call Allen Ginsberg, who expresses the themes and values in his poetry. He was, in fact, the first Beat Writer to gain popular notice when he delivered a performance of his now famous poem, Howl, in October of 1955. The Beat Generation is typically described as a vision, not an idea and being hard to define. It is characterized as a cultural revolution in process, made by a post-World War II generation of disaffiliated young people...without spiritual values they could honor (Char ...
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  • American Dream - 755 words
    American Dream What specific ills does Miller diagnose in the America Dream? Discuss with reference to "Death of a Salesman". The American Dream is an idea that originated from the Pilgrim Fathers and has remained in the American society. It is the belief that America is the land of opportunity where everyone can be "great". The word "dream" is in fact probably the best way to describe the problems that Arthur Miller can see in this belief. The word "dream" can suggest something wonderful to look forward to achieving, or, it may imply that something is only a dream, something that is impossible to achieve. We can see Miller believes "dream" to mean the latter of these interpretations when we ...
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  • American Philosophy - 626 words
    American Philosophy In all its forms, American philosophy emphasizes freedom and the supreme importance of the individual. Indeed, an examination of four major American writers shows these concepts in all four main schools of American thought-- Epicureanism, Transcendentalism, Pragmatism, and Protestantism. Epicureanism is the pursuit of pleasure in order to avoid pain. This philosophy is very American. One of the most famous American-Epicureans is Walt Whitman. Whitman is, perhaps, America's greatest poet. He was an ardent supporter of freedom and democracy. His poetry not only reflected his love and respect for America, but also the importance and the needs of the individual. Whitman's lov ...
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  • Blooming Trinity - 1,233 words
    Blooming Trinity English 1302.018 October 11, 2000 Blooming Trinity In the poem When Lilacs Last In The Dooryard Bloomd, by Walt Whitman, three important symbols are introduced. These symbols of a star, the lilac, and a bird exhibit Whitmans transcendentalism and serve as an allusion to Abraham Lincolns life and death. Whitmans poetry, through these symbols, opens a window to the prevailing social attitudes, moral beliefs, and cultural disposition of his time through his allusions to President Lincoln. To understand Whitmans poetry one must first know something about the poet himself. Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in Long Island New York. Whitman disliked the idea of becoming a carpe ...
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  • Born In Boston In 1809, Edgar Poe Was Destined To Lead A Rather Somber And Brief Life, Most Of It - 1,175 words
    ... se ideas, along with those of Plato, the Neoplatonists, Asian mystics, and SWEDENBORG, strongly influenced his philosophy. Returning home (1835), he settled in Concord, Mass., which he, Margaret FULLER, THOREAU, and others made a center of TRANSCENDENTALISM. He stated the movement's main principles in Nature (1836), stressing the mystical unity of nature. A noted lecturer, Emerson called for American intellectual independence from Europe in his Phi Beta Kappa address at Harvard ("The American Scholar," 1837 [.txt-only version]). In an address at the Harvard divinity school (1838), he asserted that redemption could be found only in one's own soul and intuition. Emerson developed transcend ...
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  • Carl Sandburg - 1,704 words
    ... o home. Final Draft Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), was an American poet, biographer, and balladeer. He was a writer, famous for his free-verse style (Carl Sandburg, 222). He focused on the people and places of modern American life. Sandburg wrote what is regarded as the definitive biography of Abraham Lincoln. He was even invited to address the joint session and to be honored, when the houses of Congress came together on Feb. 12, 1959, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the birth of Lincoln. Sandburg was well known as a lecturer and singer (Carl Sandburg, 392). His craggy voice along with his guitar made him a great performer of folk songs. The two most impressive things about Carl Sandbu ...
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  • Civil War - 3,706 words
    ... iority. They also feared competition from freed slaves for their trades. The economic viability of slavery is a debatable issue. Slavery as an efficient labor system was not feasible, as the slaves did not have enough compulsion to do more than would be extracted from them by force. Slavery made the souths economic system less flexible and progressive. The success of plantation agriculture hindered the growth of a more diversified economy. The reluctance of white men to work as a free labor force due to the social stigma attached to it meant that the economy never progressed beyond the rural character to industrialization uniformly. Huge profits were made by businessmen at the expense of ...
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  • Dead Poets Society - 930 words
    Dead Poets Society Sometimes in life people can come along and touch our lives in unexpected ways. This was the case with Mr. Keating and the boys in the movie "Dead Poets Society". He taught the boys so many lessons that they would have never learned from any other teacher. By looking at scenes from the movie, and lines from the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Walt Whitman, we can see just how important the lessons were that Keating was trying to teach the boys. Mr. Keating reminded them to seize each day and cherish them dearly. From the very first day that Mr. Keating had walked into the classroom you could already see that he had an original method of teaching. He came into class whistl ...
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