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  • American Scholar By Ralph Waldo Emerson - 544 words
    American Scholar By Ralph Waldo Emerson The American Scholar by Ralph Waldo Emerson In the essay the American Scholar, Emerson portrays the scholar as a person who learns from three main things. These things by which a scholar is educated are by nature, by books (the past) and by action. Emerson uses nature as a comparison to the human mind where he states, "There is never a beginning, there is never an end to the inexplicable continuity of this web of God, but always circular power returning into itself."(296) The human mind is an object that is boundless and can be full of so much beauty and intellect such as nature can be. Emerson continues to explain how classification begins among the y ...
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  • Ralph Waldo Emerson - 635 words
    Ralph Waldo Emerson Introduction Ralph Waldo Emerson was truly one of our great geniuses even though he may have a short biography (Hodgins 212). But as Emerson once said himself, Great geniuses have the shortest biographies. Emerson was also a major leader of the philosophical movement of Transcendentalism. (Encarta 1) Transcendentalism was belief in a higher reality than that found everyday life that a human can achieve. Biographical Information Emerson was born on May 25, 1803 in Boston, Massachusetts. His father died when he was young and his mother was left with him and his four other siblings. At the age of 18 he graduated from Harvard University and was a teacher for three years in Bo ...
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  • Ralph Waldo Emerson - 362 words
    Ralph Waldo Emerson Analysis of Genius Ralph Waldo Emerson was a brilliant man who took the meaning of self-reliance to another uniform. His convoluted conceptions on Genius and Transdentalism are more in touch with self. His inhabitants and whereabouts such as the Waldon pond were very substantial to him. David Thoreau a mere apprentice also shared the same residents for a brief time with Emerson. The two believed that society was everywhere like a joint stock company, where its members agree for better security of its bread for the shareholders. Both having strong belief in simplicity altered their lifestyle to a solitude place in nature. One would pose the question of Emerson's inclinatio ...
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  • Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1,082 words
    Ralph Waldo Emerson Ralph Waldo Emerson certainly took his place in the history of American Literature . He lived in a time when romanticism was becoming a way of thinking and beginning to bloom in America, the time period known as The Romantic Age. Romantic thinking stressed on human imagination and emotion rather than on basic facts and reason. Ralph Waldo Emerson not only provided plenty of that, but he also nourished it and inspired many other writers of that time. "His influence can be found in the works of Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Henry James, and Robert Frost.". No doubt, Ralph Waldo Emerson was an astute and intellectual man who influenced ...
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  • Ralph Waldo Emerson - 415 words
    Ralph Waldo Emerson Ralph Waldo Emerson was a famous American essayist and poet. Through his life he faced many conflicts such as his career. He was one of Americas most influential authors and thinkers. Before Emerson began to write he was a minister. Emerson had to deal with many things throughout his life for example his health and family problems. Ralph Emerson had a very frustrating childhood. Emerson was born on May 25, 1803, in Boston, Massachusetts. He was the second of five sons. Poverty and sickness marked Emersons life. His father died when hi was eight years old. Which left his mother to raise five boys. One of his younger brothers was mentally ill and spent most of his life in i ...
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  • Transcendentalism:ralph Waldo Emerson - 787 words
    Transcendentalism:Ralph Waldo Emerson Transcendentalism: Ralph Waldo Emerson Transcendentalism, in philosophy and nature, is the belief in a higher reality than found in sense experience or in a higher knowledge than achieved by human reason. Transcendentalism upholds the goodness of humanity, the glories of nature, and the importance of free individual expression. In addition, it is maintained that an awareness of reality, or a sense of truth, is reached through reasoning by intuition. Transcendentalism also holds that material objects do not have any real existence of their own. Rather, these objects are diffused aspects of God, the Over-Soul. In its most usage, transcendentalism refers to ...
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  • A Thinker - 681 words
    A Thinker annon One of the oddest progression of life is probably when someone is growing up. All those memories of failures which you hope could be thrown into the garbage can like a piece of paper and all those memories of successes which you hope could be saved on a c omputer like a piece of hard disk turns into endless thoughts similar to that of a math problem which the equation contains the variable infinity. I am more of a thinker than accomplisher. Due to this problem it usually takes me longer to do my homework t han the other kids. I remember in elementary school my fifth grade teacher used to say, 'If you think while you write everything would be easier for you.' Such as for this ...
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  • American Philosophy - 626 words
    American Philosophy In all its forms, American philosophy emphasizes freedom and the supreme importance of the individual. Indeed, an examination of four major American writers shows these concepts in all four main schools of American thought-- Epicureanism, Transcendentalism, Pragmatism, and Protestantism. Epicureanism is the pursuit of pleasure in order to avoid pain. This philosophy is very American. One of the most famous American-Epicureans is Walt Whitman. Whitman is, perhaps, America's greatest poet. He was an ardent supporter of freedom and democracy. His poetry not only reflected his love and respect for America, but also the importance and the needs of the individual. Whitman's lov ...
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  • Blooming Trinity - 1,233 words
    Blooming Trinity English 1302.018 October 11, 2000 Blooming Trinity In the poem When Lilacs Last In The Dooryard Bloomd, by Walt Whitman, three important symbols are introduced. These symbols of a star, the lilac, and a bird exhibit Whitmans transcendentalism and serve as an allusion to Abraham Lincolns life and death. Whitmans poetry, through these symbols, opens a window to the prevailing social attitudes, moral beliefs, and cultural disposition of his time through his allusions to President Lincoln. To understand Whitmans poetry one must first know something about the poet himself. Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in Long Island New York. Whitman disliked the idea of becoming a carpe ...
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  • Born In Boston In 1809, Edgar Poe Was Destined To Lead A Rather Somber And Brief Life, Most Of It - 1,175 words
    ... se ideas, along with those of Plato, the Neoplatonists, Asian mystics, and SWEDENBORG, strongly influenced his philosophy. Returning home (1835), he settled in Concord, Mass., which he, Margaret FULLER, THOREAU, and others made a center of TRANSCENDENTALISM. He stated the movement's main principles in Nature (1836), stressing the mystical unity of nature. A noted lecturer, Emerson called for American intellectual independence from Europe in his Phi Beta Kappa address at Harvard ("The American Scholar," 1837 [.txt-only version]). In an address at the Harvard divinity school (1838), he asserted that redemption could be found only in one's own soul and intuition. Emerson developed transcend ...
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  • Bring On The Cheesecake - 1,408 words
    Bring On The Cheesecake I AM ... beautiful. As you are beautiful, as he is beautiful, as all of us, even our enemies, are beautiful. And yet, most of us spend a good portion of our everyday lives looking in the mirror, critiquing ourselves, pointing out problem areas, and generally going ugh. We compare ourselves to Kate Moss, Ricky Martin, Nicole Kidman, Brad Pitt, and Brittney Spears, all of whom in our eyes exemplify the ultimate in beauty, sensuality, and ... airbrushing. Yes, airbrushing, that oh-so-handy technique employed by magazines worldwide to make the attractive look perfect. Perfect? You call Kate Moss perfect? Every time I see her picture, I just want to force-feed her a huge p ...
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  • Carl Sandburg - 1,704 words
    ... o home. Final Draft Carl Sandburg (1878-1967), was an American poet, biographer, and balladeer. He was a writer, famous for his free-verse style (Carl Sandburg, 222). He focused on the people and places of modern American life. Sandburg wrote what is regarded as the definitive biography of Abraham Lincoln. He was even invited to address the joint session and to be honored, when the houses of Congress came together on Feb. 12, 1959, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the birth of Lincoln. Sandburg was well known as a lecturer and singer (Carl Sandburg, 392). His craggy voice along with his guitar made him a great performer of folk songs. The two most impressive things about Carl Sandbu ...
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  • Civil Disobedience - 281 words
    Civil Disobedience Civil Disobedience Civil disobedience is the refusal to obey civil laws. This refusal is in the form of nonviolence. People who use civil disobedience are usually protesting a law that they think is unjust. Usually, they are also willing to accept any penalty like imprisonment. Henry David Thoreau was born in 1817 at Concord, Massachusetts. He was Educated at Harvard University. During his early years Henry spent most of his time walking in the wilderness or talking with his mentor and friend Ralph Waldo Emerson. In July of 1846, Henry needed his shoes which had holes in them repaired. After the cobbler repaired the shoes Henry exited the store and was approached by Sam St ...
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  • Dead Poets Society - 930 words
    Dead Poets Society Sometimes in life people can come along and touch our lives in unexpected ways. This was the case with Mr. Keating and the boys in the movie "Dead Poets Society". He taught the boys so many lessons that they would have never learned from any other teacher. By looking at scenes from the movie, and lines from the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Walt Whitman, we can see just how important the lessons were that Keating was trying to teach the boys. Mr. Keating reminded them to seize each day and cherish them dearly. From the very first day that Mr. Keating had walked into the classroom you could already see that he had an original method of teaching. He came into class whistl ...
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  • Emerson And Feudalism - 804 words
    Emerson And Feudalism America was opened after the feudal mischief was spent, and so the people made a good start. Was Ralph Waldo Emerson correct in that assertion? Why or why not? How were a persons rights and responsibilities determined in the feudal era? How are a persons rights and responsibilities determined in the United States today? What evidence is there in the U.S. Constitution that Americans rejected or accepted beliefs that were commonly held in the feudal era? To begin to fully understand what Emerson really meant in his speech from Bostons Old South Church, we must break it down. First, when Emerson speaks of the feudal mischief being spent, he means that the peak of the feu ...
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  • Emerson And Feudalism - 802 words
    Emerson And Feudalism "America was opened after the feudal mischief was spent, and so the people made a good start." Was Ralph Waldo Emerson correct in that assertion? Why or why not? How were a persons rights and responsibilities determined in the feudal era? How are a persons rights and responsibilities determined in the United States today? What evidence is there in the U.S. Constitution that Americans rejected or accepted beliefs that were commonly held in the feudal era? To begin to fully understand what Emerson really meant in his speech from Bostons Old South Church, we must break it down. First, when Emerson speaks of the feudal mischief being spent, he means that the peak of the f ...
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  • Emerson And Whitman: Views Of Self - 614 words
    Emerson and Whitman: Views of Self "What is man anyhow? What am I? What are you?" asks Whitman. Who we are, what our purpose is and what the meaning of life is are all mysteries that man has tried to solve from his earliest history. Whitman and Emerson explore these ideas in their works, Song of Myself and Self Reliance. Whitman, an American poet, and Emerson, an American philosopher, take different approaches in their search for self-discovery, yet within their solutions, many parallels can be found. Emersons message is one of non-conformity and individuality. He views every man as unique within, and feels society, exterior elements and tradition are mans downfall. He urges us to be a produ ...
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  • Emerson V Thoreau - 1,515 words
    Emerson V Thoreau Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau: Lecture Essay March 13, 1846 -A lecture by Henry David Thoreau Henry D. Thoreau gave an intellectually stimulating lecture. His political and environmental stances enchanted the audience. His ideas are indicative of self-reliance, simplicity and appreciation. His delivery invited each listener to actively enjoy what he said. Thoreau presented his lecture so that the audience had no choice but to ponder and think about what he said. He was passionate in what he said, as his values and views leaked into the audience like a stream branching out from a river. The following is what I took away from his speech. Thoreau began his speech ...
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  • Emersonian Person - 990 words
    Emersonian Person The most Emersonian person that I have ever known would be with out a doubt be Frederick Jones. I spent two summers working with this man on the Linville River for the Kawana fishing club. In ТSelf RelianceУ Emerson writes ТYour genuine action will explain itself and will explain your other genuine actions. Your conformity explains nothingУ. This is clearly a call for individuality in men. Though Frederick has probably never read or even heard of Ralph Waldo Emerson, his way of life is very much in line with what Emerson claims will be the only true way to inner peace. Frederick is very much a mystery to the people of Linville, and except for those w ...
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  • Emily Dickinson - 1,573 words
    Emily Dickinson Emily Dickinson lived in an era of Naturalism and Realism (1855-1910). She lived in a period of The Civil War and the Frontier. She was affected by her life and the era she lived in. She also had many deaths in her family and thats part of the reason that she was very morbid and wrote about death. Emily Dickinson grew up in Amherst, Massachusetts in the nineteenth century. As a child she was brought up into the Puritan way of life. She was born on December 10, 1830 and died fifty-six years later. Emily lived isolated in the house she was born in; except for the short time she attended Amherst Academy and Holyoke Female Seminary. Emily Dickinson never married and lived on the ...
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