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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: wadsworth

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  • The Courtship Of Miles Standish By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 18071882 - 1,839 words
    The Courtship of Miles Standish by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) The Courtship of Miles Standish by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) Type of Work: Romantic narrative poem Setting Plymouth, Massachusetts; 1621 Principal Characters Miles Standish, a soldier and protector of the colony John Alden, his younger, bookish friend Priscilla, a young Puritan woman Play Overveiw On a spring afternoon in 1621, Captain Miles Standish, a short, powerfully-built man of middle age and a recent widower, stood in his house, surveying with pride his well-polished weapons of war. "If you wish a thing to be well done, you must do it yourself," he preached to his young friend John Alden, who sat wr ...
    Related: courtship, henry wadsworth longfellow, longfellow, wadsworth, wadsworth longfellow
  • American Verna - 1,012 words
    ... did not change much through the years. A cause could be in the human's nature of the need for belonging to a whole. There are two main approaches that could break the firmness of a social structure. One comes from outside the system by enculturation, and attacks the un-fairness of the structure with compare to other ones. A second approach could be made by the lower classes demanding for better conditions. In India, there seems to be a form of harmony and peace within the lower classes. The "Herd Theory" explains this phenomenon by going back to the nature of human behavior. As other animals, people seem to think that a great form of self-defense is associating with ones who seem share c ...
    Related: american, american system, chicago press, significant difference, contrast
  • An Eye For An Eye - 1,150 words
    An Eye For An Eye? The most severe of all sentences is in fact the death penalty. Also known as capital punishment, it's the most severe form of corporal punishment as it requires law enforcement officers to kill the offender. It has been banned in many countries, in the United States, an earlier move to eliminate capital punishment has now been reversed and more and more states are resorting to capital punishment for serious offenses such as murder. Like they say: An Eye for and eye, or a life for a life as it applies in this case. The Bible mentions it, and people have been using it regularly for centuries. One steals from those who have stolen from him, one wrongs those who have wronged h ...
    Related: corporal punishment, crime and punishment, deterrence theory, imprisonment
  • Anselm - 1,489 words
    Anselm Not every great writer can be correct in what he or she is saying. This is the idea that Gaunilo had in mind when he wrote his criticism to St. Anselm's Ontological Argument which states that if something greater than anything else that could be thought of is conceived in the understanding then it must exist. Gaunilo says it is foolish to believe in the existence of something just because it is understood. He says there must be some kind of other explanation. In this paper, I will try to explain both Anselm's theory and Gaunilo's argument by first breaking each of them down in simpler terms. I will attempt to show what Gaunilo is trying to discredit with his objection. One of St. Anse ...
    Related: anselm, wadsworth publishing, ontological argument, existence of god, confused
  • Are Your Ears Open - 1,163 words
    Are Your Ears Open "Wisdom is the reward you get for a lifetime of listening when you'd have preferred to talk." (Deep and Sussman 76) Upon studying listening within another course, the vast and somewhat unclear subject began to become clearer. The act of listening entails in-depth processes that elude a majority of people's knowledge. The act of listening involves four main parts: hearing, attention, understanding and remembering. Listening entails a vast amount of information that a majority of people does not know or understand. The common view on listening often does not even involve true listening. People often mistake hearing for listening. Just because you heard something does not nec ...
    Related: ears, verbal communication, addison wesley, eastern michigan, utilize
  • Are Your Ears Open - 1,163 words
    Are Your Ears Open? Are your ears open? Wisdom is the reward you get for a lifetime of listening when youd have preferred to talk. (Deep and Sussman 76) Upon studying listening within another course, the vast and somewhat unclear subject began to become clearer. The act of listening entails in-depth processes that elude a majority of peoples knowledge. The act of listening involves four main parts: hearing, attention, understanding and remembering. Listening entails a vast amount of information that a majority of people does not know or understand. The common view on listening often does not even involve true listening. People often mistake hearing for listening. Just because you heard somet ...
    Related: ears, boca raton, verbal communication, long term memory, prentice-hall
  • Bipolar Disorder - 729 words
    Bipolar Disorder Bipolar disorder is perhaps one of the most tragic mood disorders, because it virtually taunts with the affected persons mind. Bipolar disorder (also known as manic-depressive disorder) is a mental condition in which the person alternates between feelings of mania and depression (Kalat, 614). These feelings are extreme opposites, and thus create tremendous mental and physical stress on the person affected. This unfortunate disorder affects one to two percent of the adult population. Before bipolar disorder can be fully understood, the two main mood stages must first be identified. During an endless bout with bipolar disorder, a person experiences many stages of mania and dep ...
    Related: bipolar, bipolar disorder, depressive disorder, disorder, different types
  • Born In Boston In 1809, Edgar Poe Was Destined To Lead A Rather Somber And Brief Life, Most Of It - 1,175 words
    ... se ideas, along with those of Plato, the Neoplatonists, Asian mystics, and SWEDENBORG, strongly influenced his philosophy. Returning home (1835), he settled in Concord, Mass., which he, Margaret FULLER, THOREAU, and others made a center of TRANSCENDENTALISM. He stated the movement's main principles in Nature (1836), stressing the mystical unity of nature. A noted lecturer, Emerson called for American intellectual independence from Europe in his Phi Beta Kappa address at Harvard ("The American Scholar," 1837 [.txt-only version]). In an address at the Harvard divinity school (1838), he asserted that redemption could be found only in one's own soul and intuition. Emerson developed transcend ...
    Related: boston, edgar, general public, waldo emerson, poets
  • Buddhist Ethics - 1,163 words
    ... such as Christianity or Islam. Buddhism is more a way of life and a learning process than a set of divine commands. This essay will define, describe, and analyze the ethics of the Buddhist religion. It will present the reader with the basic principles and truths of Buddhism. It will begin with information on the origin of Buddhism and some details on the life of its founder, Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha. Also it will explain the beliefs and moral behaviors of Buddhists. Siddhartha Gautama, later known in his life as the Buddha, meaning the Enlightened or Awakened One, was born around 563 B.C.E. He was born and raised in what is now known as Nepal, near the Himalayan Mountains. He belo ...
    Related: buddhist, ethics, noble eightfold path, major religions, tree
  • Buddhist Wisdom - 1,121 words
    Buddhist Wisdom Throughout history people have wondered about the universe in which we live in and looked for a purpose of our existence. Many Western philosophers believed that an individual is a separate entity from every other individual and nature. In the Buddhist belief however, there is no separation between you and any other person or animal. The goal of living and dying is to eventually see the world as it actually is instead of the illusion that we see with our senses. This state of enlightenment is known as Nirvana. To reach Nirvana it is necessary to give up attachments to the things of this world, see the interconnectedness of everything, and clear your mind so that you can see t ...
    Related: buddhist, wisdom, the prince, different aspects, hermann
  • Business Research - 1,523 words
    ... s to the answers. Newsom sites an example of an organization trying to determine where employer bias might play in the event of employment discrimination by asking a the following question: If you had two applicants absolutely equal in terms of educational background and experience, and one was a woman or a member of a minority race, or both, which would you hire? The answer is then interpreted and depending on the employers response, the interviewer is open to several lines of questioning. Adversely, personal interviews can also lead a company down the wrong path. Kotler states that intercept interviews have the drawback of being non-probability samples, and the interviews must be quite ...
    Related: business journal, business research, research techniques, financial risk, cost analysis
  • Community And Social Structure - 780 words
    Community And Social Structure AssignmentIII The idea of people being social in nature can be clearly illustrated by the groups, or communities that one sees all around them. Groups of individuals share a common perspective of what reality consists of, this is known as culture(Charon, 1997). This reality is perceived through our interactions with others in the group and by what our position is within that group(Charon, 1997). The way in which we see the world is in a sense limited by both our position and our interactions. In order to actually fill your position in the group you need to have a working set of ideas and concepts to get the job done(Charon, 1997). This working set of ideas is a ...
    Related: social structure, sociological perspective, wadsworth publishing, north carolina, lethal
  • Counseling Processes - 1,040 words
    Counseling Processes II. DEFINITION OF TERMS Counseling - the act or process of giving counsel - the process of assisting and guiding clients, especially by a trained person on a professional basis, to resolve personal, social, or psychological problems and difficulties - a generic term that is used to cover the several processes of interviewing, testing, guiding, advising, etc. designed to help an individual solve problems, plan for the future, etc. Process - a systematic series of actions directed to one end - a continuous action or series of changes taking place in a definite manner III. PRESENTATION AND DISCUSSION In counseling, there are many processes used by a counselor in his session ...
    Related: counseling, processes, abnormal psychology, substance abuse, grief
  • Death Penalty Errors - 1,588 words
    Death Penalty Errors Frym' or Stickm': Either Way It Is Wrong Today's system of capital punishment tolerates many inequalities and injustices. The common arguments for the death penalty are filled with holes. Imposing the death penalty is expensive and time consuming. Each year billions of dollars are spent to sentence criminals to death. Perhaps the most frequently raised argument against capital punishment is that of its cost. Other thoughts on the death penalty are to turn criminals away from committing violent acts. A just argument against the death penalty would be that sentencing an individual to death prevents future crimes by other individuals. However, criminals are not afraid of th ...
    Related: death penalty, death sentence, penalty, brief overview, human life
  • Dickinson, Emily Elizabeth 18301886, Americas Bestknown Female Poet And One Of The Foremost Authors In American Literature Di - 986 words
    Dickinson, Emily Elizabeth (1830-1886), Americas best-known female poet and one of the foremost authors in American literature. Dickinsons simply constructed yet intensely felt, acutely intellectual writings take as their subject issues vital to humanity: the agonies and ecstasies of love, sexuality, the unfathomable nature of death, the horrors of war, God and religious belief, the importance of humor, and musings on the significance of literature, music, and art. Life Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, Dickinson was the middle child of a prominent lawyer and one-term United States congressional representative, Edward Dickinson, and his wife, Emily Norcross Dickinson. From 1840 to 1847 she att ...
    Related: american, american literature, americas, authors, elizabeth, emily, emily dickinson
  • Diving Sport - 1,210 words
    ... e site. A buddy is there to help you check your gear and, when underwater, to help you in case of an emergency. After you are in the water, put on the fins, mask, and snorkel, and, carrying a weight belt, walk slowly backward to the middle of a shallow area. Sit on the bottom with the weight belt across your thighs. When inhaling, the body should make a slow rise. If it does not rise, then the weight should be decreased. This makes the body neutrally buoyant. Always make sure the mouthpiece and mask are clear. Free ascent should also be learned in case of emergency and the diver must ascend without his gear. The ascent is made slowly, and a constant exhalation of air is required. If you ...
    Related: diving, englewood cliffs, carbon dioxide, prentice hall, buddy
  • Drugs And Crime - 1,450 words
    ... t if they live with the general population, it is much harder to break away from old habits. The primary clinical staff is usually made up of former substance abusers that at one time were rehabilitated in therapeutic communities. The perspective of the treatment is that the problem is with the whole person and not the drug. The addiction is a symptom and not the core of the disorder. The primary goal is to change patterns of behavior, thinking, and feeling that predispose drug use (Inciardi et al. 1997, pp. 261-278). This returns to the general theory of crime and the argument that it is the opportunity that creates the problem. If you take away the opportunity to commit crimes by chang ...
    Related: crime, crime prevention, drug abuse, drug treatment, drugs, drugs and crime, war on drugs
  • Eating Disorders - 1,832 words
    Eating Disorders Two million people in the world suffer from eating disorders, whether it is anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa. Two thirds of teenage girls and one third of teenage boys do not like their bodies and the weights they are at. Many people suffer from related conditions like bulimia and anorexia but do not meet specific conditions to have their symptoms called that. This category is called unspecified eating disorders. Symptoms of unspecified eating disorders are restrained eating, binge eating, purging, fears of fatness, and distortion of body image. People suffer from eating disorders because of our society standards. Everyone wants to look like a supermodel but not everyone ...
    Related: binge eating, disorders, eating disorder, eating disorders, abnormal behavior
  • Edgar Allen Poe - 1,076 words
    Edgar Allen Poe Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) Written and Contributed by SUGABUGA456 Edgar Allan Poe was one of Americas famous poets, fiction short-story writers, and literary critics. He is known as the first master of short story form especially in tales of horror, and mystery. The work he produced was considered to be some of the most influential literary criticism of his time. His poems made him one of the most famous figures in American literary history. His influence on literature is seen in all literature books in schools everywhere. Some of his famous writings is that of "Annabel Lee"; his detective story, "The Murders in Rue Morgue"; "The Pit and the Pendulum" and "The Tell-Tale Hear ...
    Related: allen, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, edgar allen
  • Edgar Allen Poe - 1,075 words
    Edgar Allen Poe Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) Written and Contributed by SUGABUGA456 Edgar Allan Poe was one of America's famous poets, fiction short-story writers, and literary critics. He is known as the first master of short story form especially in tales of horror, and mystery. The work he produced was considered to be some of the most influential literary criticism of his time. His poems made him one of the most famous figures in American literary history. His influence on literature is seen in all literature books in schools everywhere. Some of his famous writings is that of "Annabel Lee"; his detective story, "The Murders in Rue Morgue"; "The Pit and the Pendulum" and "The Tell-Tale Hea ...
    Related: allen, edgar, edgar allan, edgar allan poe, edgar allen
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