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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: wabash

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  • Thomas Riley Marshall Was Born In North Ranchester, Indiana On March 14, 1854 He Graduated From Wabash College In 1873 Where - 292 words
    Thomas Riley Marshall was born in North Ranchester, Indiana on March 14, 1854. He graduated from Wabash College in 1873 where he studied law. Afterwards he was admitted to the Indiana bar in 1875, practicing his profession in Columbia City. His father was a physician. He was also a popular public speaker and active in local Democratic politics. Marshall was a small town lawyer when he received the nomination for governor in 1908, a compromise darkhorse candidate. His political party for governor was Democratic and he was also very progressive. He was a popular governor, although his attempts to have the state adopt a new constitution failed. He stayed governor until 1913. At the democratic n ...
    Related: indiana, marshall, riley, wabash, small town
  • Although Musicians Had Been Recording Fiddle Tunes Known As Old Time Music At That Time In The - 4,440 words
    Although musicians had been recording fiddle tunes (known as Old Time Music at that time) in the southern Appalachians for several years, It wasn't until August 1, 1927 in Bristol, Tennessee, that Country Music really began. There, on that day, Ralph Peer signed Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family to recording contracts for Victor Records. These two recording acts set the tone for those to follow - Rodgers with his unique singing style and the Carters with their extensive recordings of old-time music. Jimmie Rodgers Known as the "Father of Country Music," James Charles Rodgers was born in Meridian, Mississippi on September 8, 1897. Always in ill health, he became a railroad hand, until ill ...
    Related: country music, music, music hall, recording, rock music
  • Ezra Pound - 422 words
    Ezra Pound Ezra Pound Ezra Pound was born in 1885 in Hailey, Idaho. He was considered one of the foremost American literary figures of the 20th century. Pound's style was unlike any other poet during this time period. He wrote about ancient and modern history with his personal reflections and experience. In Pound's poetry he tested many new forms of verses. Pound influenced young authors such as: James Joyce, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, and Ernest Hemingway. When Pound was 15 years old he had already decided that he wanted to be a poet. In 1901 Pound had decided to attend the University of Pennsylvania. After the two years he spent at the University of Pennsylvania, he transferred to Hamilton ...
    Related: ezra, ezra pound, pound, ernest hemingway, mental hospital
  • Hindu Revival In America - 2,214 words
    Hindu Revival In America Hindu Revival In An Alien Land. America is coming alive with the sounds and images of Hinduism. From Ras and Garbha dances during Navratri in Chicago and Edison to Diwali fireworks in Manhattan's South Street Seaport; from the sounds of conches and the chanting of hymnals at temple ceremonies in Pittsburgh and Flushing to the consecration of new dieties at the Balaji Temple in Bridgewater, N.J., and the foundation-laying ceremony for a new Shree Raseshwari temple in Austin, Texas; from the modest get-togethers of the devout before a makeshift alter in a three-car garage in Glen Mills, Pa., to mini-culfests in Atlanta and New York University, the American landscape th ...
    Related: america, hindu, revival, material culture, york city
  • Jp Morgan - 2,385 words
    ... 895. However, President Cleveland himself emphasized the public service that had been rendered. This event was only one of many debatable issues that concerned Morgan and his control over the government and the American market. President Roosevelt investigated Morgan's large deal with the U.S. Steel Corporation and Tennessee Railroad Company but found that that the means employed were none the less effective, as well as profitable. The culmination of the government and public's suspicion of Morgan's activities were the Pujo hearings of 1912. The House Banking and Currency subcommittee headed by representative Arsene Pujo had been trying to establish that a money trust ruled over America' ...
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  • Life And World Of Al Capone By Kopler - 1,623 words
    Life And World Of Al Capone By Kopler Al Capone is America's best known gangster and the single greatest symbol of the collapse of law and order in the United States during the 1920s Prohibition era. Capone had a leading role in the illegal activities that lent Chicago its reputation as a lawless city. Capone was born on January 17, 1899, in Brooklyn, New York. Baptized "Alphonsus Capone," he grew up in a rough neighborhood and was a member of two "kid gangs," the Brooklyn Rippers and the Forty Thieves Juniors. Although he was bright, Capone quit school in the sixth grade at age fourteen. Between scams he was a clerk in a candy store, a pinboy in a bowling alley, and a cutter in a book binde ...
    Related: capone, public enemy, doing business, stock market, hearing
  • Tecumseh - 1,513 words
    Tecumseh and the Quest for Indian Leadership By: R. David Edmunds Luke Adair His 101 Mr. Jack McKnight Tecumseh was the fifth child born into the family in 1768. Tecumseh always the leader springboards into the position of War Chief, in which he leads many battles and defenses for the Shawnee tribe. Europeans settled in North America, claiming land that was never theirs to claim. The British initially making a deal to protect the Indians went back on it when a battle broke out in which many Shawnee fled the battlegrounds to a British Fort, where they were not allowed inside for protection. On August 3rd, the Indians signed a treaty calling for them to remain at peace, relinquish all the pris ...
    Related: tecumseh, west coast, men and women, family life, livestock
  • The Kickapoo Indians - 1,988 words
    The Kickapoo Indians The Kickapoo Indians are Algonkian-speaking Indians, related to the Sauk and Fox, who lived at the portage between the Fox and Wisconsin rivers, probably in present Columbia County, Wis., U.S., when first reported by Europeans in the late 17th century. The Kickapoo were known as formidable warriors whose raids took them over a wide territory, ranging as far as Georgia and Alabama to the southeast; Texas and Mexico to the southwest; and New York and Pennsylvania to the east. Early in the 18th century part of the tribe settled near the Milwaukee River and, after the destruction of the Illinois Indians c. 1765, moved south to Peoria. One band extended as far as the Sangamon ...
    Related: federal indian, indian territory, lake erie, important role, winnebago
  • The Kickapoo Indians - 2,062 words
    ... apoo intervened and saved his life, Discouraged and his trade permit revoked, Perrot left soon afterwards and went back to Quebec taking his secret of how to win the friendship of the Kickapoo with him. Meanwhile, the Iroquois had seen their opportunity to reverse their military defeat through economic warfare and were offering French allies access to the British traders at Albany. More than 1,000 Fox, Kickapoo, and Mascouten arrived at Detroit. The Fox were returning to what had been their homeland before the Beaver Wars. In 1712, a Mascouten hunting party was attacked in southern Michigan by Potawatomi and Ottawa and fled east to their Fox and Kickapoo allies near Detroit. As the Fox, ...
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  • The Robber Barons Of The 19th Century - 1,045 words
    THE ROBBER BARONS OF THE 19TH CENTURY Cornelius Vanderbuilt... ... an ill educated, ungrammatical, coarse, and ruthless, but clear-visioned man. He started his millions in the steamboat industry. As a young boy he went to work for a small steamboat owner, Thomas Gibbons. After learning how to operate a steamboat, he designed one and persuaded Gibbons to build it. Vanderbuilt's slogans of low prices for superior rates attracted many customers. But an unknown to the passengers was that the food and drink on the boat was extravagantly overpriced. Later Vanderbuilt saw that real money was in the railroad business. He established a shipping-land transit across Nicaragua, in response to the Califo ...
    Related: robber, robber barons, vertical integration, federal government, baron
  • The Union Movement Of The Late 19th Century - 913 words
    The Union Movement Of The Late 19Th Century The union movement of the late 19th century by Eli Hatch During 1870 through 1900 workers joined together; responding to the power of their employers caused by the growth of industrialization. The worker did not always have the luxury of leaving after eight hours of work, the right to representation, or the even the right to work in a safe environment. The working people of nineteenth century America had to unite in struggle to achieve the gains that are often taken selfishly and taken for granted today. There were many successes and failures in organized labor; the successes were often obtained through the loss of the worker, often through lost wa ...
    Related: century america, nineteenth century, union members, union pacific, organized labor
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