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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: voluntary euthanasia

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  • Why I Believe In Voluntary Euthanasia - 1,890 words
    Why I Believe In Voluntary Euthanasia Why I Believe In Voluntary Euthanasia There are at least two forms of suicide. One is 'emotional suicide', or irrational self-murder in all of it complexities and sadness. Let me emphasis at once that my view of this tragic form of self-destruction is the same as that of the suicide intervention movement and the rest of society, which is to prevent it wherever possible. I do not support any form of suicide for mental health or emotional reasons. But I do say that there is a second form of suicide -- justifiable suicide, that is, rational and planned self- deliverance from a painful and hopeless disease which will shortly end in death. I don't think the w ...
    Related: euthanasia, voluntary, voluntary euthanasia, modern times, oregon death
  • An Argument For Euthanasia - 1,994 words
    An Argument For Euthanasia An Argument for Euthanasia Euthanasia is defined as, "The act or practice of putting to death painlessly a person suffering from an incurable disease." Euthanasia can be traced back as far back as the ancient Greek and Roman civilizations. It was sometimes allowed in these civilizations to help others die. Voluntary euthanasia was approved in these ancient societies. Today, the practice of euthanasia causes great controversy. Both pro-life groups and right-to-die groups present arguments for their different sides. Pro-life groups make arguments and present fears against euthanasia. I contend that the case for the right to die is the stronger argument. I will begin ...
    Related: euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, unethical practice, medical association, dear
  • Assisted Suicide - 1,085 words
    Assisted Suicide Questions concerning the right to end one's life have long generated storms of controversy. These questions, involving intensely personal views on issues no less profound than the meaning of life and liberty, are unlikely to disappear any time soon. The conservative nature of the medical profession, and the organized opposition of the "right to life" movement, along with disagreement among disabilities rights organizations, perpetuate the controversy. The heat from the debate in turn only intensifies the difficult choices people with end-stage AIDS, and their loved ones, may face when life is overwhelmed by irreversible illness and unrelenting pain. In this essay I am going ...
    Related: assisted suicide, doctor assisted suicide, physician assisted, physician assisted suicide, physician-assisted suicide, suicide
  • Assisted Suicide - 1,706 words
    Assisted Suicide Assisted suicide (or Euthanasia) is a topic undergoing serious debate. There exist two obvious and definite opinions regarding this controversy. The anti-euthanasia faction consist of:  Conservative religious groups. They are often the same organizations that oppose access to abortion.  Medical associations whose members are dedicated to saving and extending life, and feel uncomfortable helping people end their lives.  Groups concerned with disabilities, which fear that euthanasia is the first step towards a society that will kill disabled people against their will. These groups bring both a religious and professional ethics perspective to the opinion ...
    Related: assisted suicide, doctor assisted suicide, physician assisted, physician assisted suicide, physician-assisted suicide, suicide
  • Euthanasia - 1,535 words
    Euthanasia Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Euthanasia Lisa, a 43-year-old woman was diagnosed with lung cancer, terminal disease. For the past 2 years Lisa has been receiving chemotherapy and taking numerous types of medication trying to prolong her life. This life prolonging treatment caught up with her. Everyday now Lisa has to battle just to get out of bed, everyday getting worse and worse. The doctors now tell Lisa she has six to eight months to live, and she has to receive 6 hours of therapy everyday. Lisa then breaks down in tears. She decides she doesn't want to go through anymore pain or suffering. Now knowing it is only a matter of time before she dies, s ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, assisted suicide, doctor who
  • Euthanasia - 2,327 words
    Euthanasia The Right to Choose The main issues of euthanasia are maintaining the status of illegality, legalizing the procedure, and regulating the procedure. The controversy of euthanasia involves moral, ethical, and legal concerns. In this country, according to a survey reported in the Journal of American Medical Association, nearly 63 percent of Americans favor legalizing physician-assisted suicide, yet most state statutes criminalize it (Stark, np). People fear that if legalized, the choice to die will eventually be taken out of their hands and placed in the hands of people who will choose to kill select people based on their own private criteria. Maybe this is true, but it is doubtful. ...
    Related: euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, insurance industry, fourteenth amendment, illegal
  • Euthanasia - 2,210 words
    ... of proper pain management, symptom control, psychological and spiritual support (Killing With Kindness, p 16). Palliative Care, opponents feel, should be more in the forefront. According to Choice in Dying, more than two million people in America die each year with 80 percent of those in care facilities. Vivienne Nathanson, head of ethics at the BMA, says that Doctors have become more aware that palliative care is effective. Temptation may come when adequate care is not available. But that's exactly what doctors and families should be demanding, not euthanasia. Once we have a perfect palliative care system, that is the time to look at the issue (Killing With Kindness, p 16). Regulated le ...
    Related: euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, terminal illness, legal issues, theological
  • Euthanasia - 1,496 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia, specifically voluntary euthanasia has been a taboo subject for many decades in this, and other countries. Euthanasia, as defined by the Oxford English Dictionary - bringing about of this, especially in the case of incurable and painful disease- comes from the Greek word euthanatos, meaning - a gentle and easy death. It is commonly known as death with dignity given to those who want the choice to die. No one can prevent death. The can only prolong it. Many people solicit their physicians to aid in the quick and easy death. Doctors, aware of ethics of their chosen profession, and consequences of their actions, especially malpractice suits, often refuse the request (www.e ...
    Related: active voluntary euthanasia, euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, death sentence, medical center
  • Euthanasia - 808 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia Euthanasia is the practice of mercifully ending a persons life in order to release the person from an incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. The word euthanasia derives from the Greek for good death and originally referred to intentional mercy killing. When medical advances made prolonging the lives of dying or comatose patients possible, the term euthanasia was also applied to a lack of action to prevent death. There are three practices that are involved with Euthanasia. The first one is voluntary (or active) euthanasia, where the person asks to be killed. This involves painlessly putting individuals to death for merciful reasons, as when a doc ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, ancient greece
  • Euthanasia - 352 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia Euthanasia is just another word for mercy killing as some people put it but it also means good death. I look at it as more of a good death if it is performed with the right procedures and if a person has a legitimate reason to be put to death but many people would not agree with me that it should be legal. There are several categories of euthanasia but in general they are all somewhat alike, the kind I think should be allowed and not looked bad upon to give the doctors that assist in the death is voluntary euthanasia. If a person has a terminal illness and wants to put them selves to death because they are suffering I feel that they should be allowed to do that under so ...
    Related: euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, terminal illness, hard times, pros
  • Euthanasia - 1,302 words
    Euthanasia There are numerous controversial issues that currently affect the evolving field of psychology. Unsolved issues on human experimentation, abortion, genetic testing, animal rights are a few examples of themes that arouse conflict and contention. Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted suicide is yet another controversial issue that has particular relevance to the field of psychology because of the apparent moral and ethical dilemmas involved. Euthanasia, by definition "a happy death," implies an easy or painless death. The purpose of this procedure is usually to end suffering analogous to the phrase "mercy killing," the practice of putting to death a persons suffering from incurable cond ...
    Related: euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, medical technology, slippery slope, completion
  • Euthanasia - 626 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia, which means "good" or "peaceful" death, has been practiced through the ages. Doctors have always been dedicated to the task of easing pain and suffering, to make dying easier. Adding the adjective "active" alters the meaning of euthanasia. The emphasis shifts from comforting the dying to inducing death. The practice of voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide would cause society to devalue all life, especially the lives of the dying, the disabled, and the elderly. We should not understate the agonies involved in chronic pain and suffering. Nobody wants to see a loved one suffer or make the decisions that accompany medical science's ability to prolong life. The same te ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, human life, human beings
  • Euthanasia - 1,452 words
    Euthanasia The word euthanasia is derived from the Greek word eu for good and thantos which means death and originally referred to intentional mercy killing. But the word it euthanasia has acquired a more complex meaning in modern times. Proponents of euthanasia believe that a dying patient has the right to end their suffering and leave the world in a dignified manner. Those who contest euthanasia believe that man does not have the right to end another person's life no matter what pain they endure. Euthanasia is one of the most important public policy issues being debated today. The outcome of debate will profoundly affect family relationships, interaction between doctors and patients, and c ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, attempted suicide
  • Euthanasia - 817 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia (also known as mercy killing) is the act or practice of painlessly putting to death persons suffering from painful or incurable disease or incapacitating physical disorder. The question about weather this is morally right or wrong has posed a major ethical dilemma on the world today. The advance of medical technology is bringing a steadily growing majority of deaths into hospitals where life, of a sort, may be prolonged for a long time. Someone has to decide what nature used to decide for us. That decision is no longer taken privately in a small family group but amidst a constantly changing crowd of doctors, nurses, patients and technicians. Because there is no specific ...
    Related: euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, doctor who, ethical dilemma, waiver
  • Euthanasia In Australia - 1,271 words
    Euthanasia In Australia When we hear the phrase voluntary euthanasia people generally think of one of two things: the active termination of life at the patient's or the Nazi extermination program of murder. Many people have beliefs about whether euthanasia is right or wrong, often without being able to define it clearly. Some people take an extreme view, while many fall somewhere between the two camps. The derivation means gentle and easy death coming from the Greek words, eu - thanatos. Euthanasia was formerly called mercy killing, euthanasia means intentionally making someone die, rather than allowing that person to die naturally. Put bluntly, euthanasia means killing in the name of compas ...
    Related: active voluntary euthanasia, australia, euthanasia, south australia, voluntary euthanasia
  • Euthanasia In Australia - 1,294 words
    ... mmonwealth parliament considered the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act to represent a basic shift in Australia's ethos and social fabric. It had additional national significance as all Australians, indeed all people, could have used the Act. It therefore became not just a matter for the people of the Northern Territory, but a matter concerning all people of Australia. The Constitutional framework of Australia divides legislative responsibility between the States and the Commonwealth. The Territories derive their legislative capacity from the Commonwealth, whereas the States do not. States therefore, are different to Territories. Territorians are consequently subjected to a different legis ...
    Related: active euthanasia, australia, euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, doctor patient relationship
  • Euthanasia In Todays Society - 1,628 words
    Euthanasia in Today's Society EuthanasiaIn today's society there are many disagreements about the rights and wrongs of euthanasia. Although death is unavoidable for human beings, suffering before death is unbearable not only for terminal patients but for the family members and friends. Euthanasia comes from the Greek word "Thanatos" meaning death and the prefix "eu" meaning easy or good (Russell 94). Thus, "eu- Thanatos" meaning easy or good death. Euthanasia is a better choice for terminal patients than suicide. In our society, suicide is always traumatic for families and friends. If there is no alternative to relieve the suffering of terminal patients, then the more humane option to suicid ...
    Related: euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, national review, alzheimer's disease, deadly
  • Euthanasia Is Defined As: The Act Of Painlessly Ending The Life Of A Person For Reasons Of Mercy Encarta 98 Proponents Of It - 398 words
    Euthanasia is defined as: the act of painlessly ending the life of a person for reasons of mercy (Encarta '98.) proponents of it believe that unnecessarily prolonging life in terminally ill patients causes immense suffering to the patient's friends and family members. Three reasons euthanasia should be supported are: euthanasia has been accepted in many other societies in the past, it helps alleviate the pain and suffering felt by people close to the patient, and it is only used after all other routes have been tried and failed. Euthanasia was accepted by many past societies. Ancient Greece and Rome both practiced it on the elderly and on children who "lacked health and vigor." Socrates and ...
    Related: artificial life, encarta, euthanasia, mercy, proponents, voluntary euthanasia
  • Morality And Practicality Of Euthanasia - 1,251 words
    ... period of suffering can be extended beyond the limit of human endurance. What's the point of allowing someone a few more months or days or hours of so-called life when death is inevitable? There's no point. In fact, it's downright inhumane. When someone under such conditions asks to be allowed to die, it's far more humane to honor that request than to deny it. (Lodle) There is no way we are going to come to grips with this problem until we also look at some of these areas that aren't going to go away . One of the toughest of these is what Victor Fuchs called flat-of-the-curve medicine- those medical procedures which are the highest in cost but achieve little or no improvement in health ...
    Related: euthanasia, morality, voluntary euthanasia, experimental procedure, health education
  • Physician Assisted Suicide - 1,174 words
    ... ndorsed the principle of the double effect, the Court did not directly apply the principle to the practice of writing drug prescriptions. The logic of the opinion supports the conclusion that physicians can continue to write prescriptions for medically indicated drugs even with the knowledge that the patients might use the drugs to commit suicide, as long as the physicians intent is to prolong the patients life and prevent suffering. The dismissal of physicians ability to use their own discretion on determining who is and who is not a candidate for euthanasia has maintained a legal loophole for physicians. The theory that is the framework for terminal sedation is that it is appropriate f ...
    Related: assisted suicide, physician, physician assisted, physician assisted suicide, physician-assisted suicide, suicide
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