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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: victorian

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  • The Turn Of The Screw As A Representation Of Victorian Sexual Repression - 722 words
    "The Turn of the Screw" as a Representation of Victorian Sexual Repression L.R.G. "The Turn of the Screw" is largely a representational book. For the most part, I think it stands to characterize Victorian views of sexuality. The entire book seems to be sex related in one way or another. Everything that happens, from Miles being kicked out of school to the governess seeing ghosts, can be interpreted with a sexual connotation. When Miles is kicked out of school, no one says exactly why. After reading the letter from the school, the governess only says that, "he's an injury to others." Because of the indirect nature of this discussion, we are left believing that the reason for his dismissal is ...
    Related: representation, repression, screw, sexual, sexual attraction, sexual repression, turn of the screw
  • The Turn Of The Screw As A Representation Of Victorian Sexual Repression - 380 words
    "The Turn of the Screw" as a Representation of Victorian Sexual Repression L.R.G. "The Turn of the Screw" is largely a representational book. For the most part, I think it stands to characterize Victorian views of sexuality. The entire book seems to be sex related in one way or another. Everything that happens, from Miles being kicked out of school to the governess seeing ghosts, can be interpreted with a sexual connotation. When Miles is kicked out of school, no one says exactly why. After reading the letter from the school, the governess only says that, "he's an injury to others." Because of the indirect nature of this discussion, we are left believing that the reason for his dismissal is ...
    Related: representation, repression, screw, sexual, sexual repression, turn of the screw, victorian
  • Child Labor In Victorian England - 1,064 words
    Child Labor In Victorian England "The report described the children as Chained, belted, harnessed like dogs...black, saturated with wet, and more than half-naked, crawling upon their hands and knees, and dragging their heavy loads behind them" (Yancey 34). This quote from Ivor Brown probably best describes the strenuous work preformed by a child laborer during the Victorian Era. Child laborers played an important part in developing the countrys economy. Children, one of the main sources of labor in Victorian England, endured less than adequate living and working conditions. During the Victorian Period children were good sources of labor. Beginning work as young as six or seven employers saw ...
    Related: child labor, labor, labor force, victorian, victorian england, victorian period
  • Child Labor In Victorian England - 1,068 words
    Child Labor In Victorian England Child Labor in Victorian England The report described the children as Chained, belted, harnessed like dogsblack, saturated with wet, and more than half-naked, crawling upon their hands and knees, and dragging their heavy loads behind them (Yancey 34). This quote from Ivor Brown probably best describes the strenuous work preformed by a child laborer during the Victorian Era. Child laborers played an important part in developing the countrys economy. Children, one of the main sources of labor in Victorian England, endured less than adequate living and working conditions. During the Victorian Period children were good sources of labor. Beginning work as young as ...
    Related: child labor, labor, labor force, victorian, victorian england, victorian period
  • During The Victorian Era - 1,688 words
    During The Victorian Era Characteristics During the Victorian Era When imagining the Victorian Age, royalty, fancy lifestyles, and elaborate living often come to mind. However, during this same era, other lifestyles and conditions of a completely different nature were occurring. Many of the English people lived in poverty. Charles Dickens, one of the great writers of this period, described how it was to live during the Victorian Era. Although England grew from an agricultural to an industrial society, not all citizens benefited from this change. In addition, the undesirable health and medical environment plagued both the wealthy and the poor. Charles Dickens was a profound British writer who ...
    Related: victorian, victorian england, industrial society, ebenezer scrooge, bacteria
  • Juliet Margaret Cameron Was A Pioneer Victorian Photographer During The Nineteenth Century She Took Up Photography Later In L - 489 words
    Juliet Margaret Cameron was a Pioneer Victorian photographer during the nineteenth century. She took up photography later in life at the age forty-eight when her daughter presented her with a camera. This simple gift sparked enthusiasm in Cameron and led her to become one of the most colorful personalities in photography. Cameron was born in Calcutta in 1815 to a well to do British Family. After being educated in Europe, she returned to the Cape of Good Hope in 1836. While she was there she met Charles Hay Cameron, whom she married in 1838. On Charles' retirement in 1848, they moved to London, the Isle of Wright, where Julia Margaret became part of Kensington's artistic community. In 1863, R ...
    Related: cameron, juliet, margaret, nineteenth, nineteenth century, photographer, photography
  • Spirit Of A Late Victorian Age - 759 words
    Spirit Of A Late Victorian Age The Spirit of a late Victorian Age. With reference to Bram Stoker's Dracula. Stoker's monstrous figure, Count Dracula, has today reached epic and almost mythical proportions, like Frankestein (not the doctor), the Gordon Medusa, even Virginia Woolf (thanks to Albee). Like the aforementioned examples, what we associate in our minds to be these monsters, mostly conditioned by popular culture and Hollywood, are merely visual representation. In the novel itself, however, according to other essayists who have thoroughly examined this piece, Dracula represents an entire genre of thinking and human development, concentrated in the prose of literature. Mark M. Hennelly ...
    Related: victorian, literary device, church of england, virginia woolf, wasteland
  • The History Of The Victorian Age - 613 words
    The History of the Victorian Age The History of the Victorian Age The Victorian era produced many eminent figures. Lytton Strachey was one of them. Born in 1880, Strachey was a British biographer and a critic who is credited of having revolutionized the art of writing biography. He opened a new era of biographical writing by adopting an irreverent attitude to the past, especially to the volumes of the Victorian biography. His book, Eminent Victorians, a wartime book composed of four miniature biographies, won him widespread recognition as a literary critic and a biographer. In this work, instead of using the conventional method of detailed chronological narration, he has carefully selected h ...
    Related: history, victorian, victorian period, victorian society, florence nightingale
  • Victorian Literature - 741 words
    Victorian Literature " The Victorian literature (1832-1901)" Victoria became queen of Great Britain in 1837. Her reign, the longest in English history, lasted until 1901. This period is called the Victorian Age. During the Victorian Age, great economic, social, and political changes occurred in Britain. The British Empire reached its height and covered about a quarter of the world's land. Industry and trade expanded rapidly, and railways and canals crisscrossed the country. Science and technology made great advances. The size of the middle class grew enormously. By the 1850's, more and more people were getting an education. In addition, the government introduced democratic reforms, such as t ...
    Related: english literature, literature, literature religion, victorian, victorian literature
  • A Doll House - 1,407 words
    A Doll House Nora Perceived by Other Characters In the Victorian age many woman were thought of as mere objects. Most woman has no real social status and were not allowed to express themselves freely. A Dolls House, a play by Henrik Ibsen, has brought controversy to the conclusion in which Nora leaves her family. Nora perceived in many different ways is the catalyst that forces Nora to leave her family. Many people had found it difficult to understand how Nora could dessert her husband and children. In the Victorian Age it was not only unheard of to walk out on your loved ones but unethical as well. There are many incidents that inch by inch helps Nora come to the conclusion that she must le ...
    Related: doll, doll house, dolls house, real world, different ways
  • A New World Not So Far Away - 1,082 words
    A New World Not So Far Away A New World Not So Far Away There are a lot of differences between the American and Chinese culture and values. Aspects such as philosophy, family values, time management, individuality, and religion are just some modern examples of the many differences between these two major industrial countries. However, one does not have to come from China to experience just how different and influential these cultures are. Throughout most of my childhood, I have been predominantly exposed to nothing but the Chinese culture. When my parents first immigrated to the United States from Canton, China, they rented a small apartment located right in the heart of Chinatown. Chinatown ...
    Related: learn english, childhood memory, reading books, bought, winter
  • A Rose For Emily - 755 words
    A Rose For Emily The Impact of Imagery The use of imagery in a short story has a great deal of effect on the impact of the story. A story with effective imagery will give the reader a clear mental picture of what is happening and enhance what the writer is trying to convey to the reader. William Faulkner exhibits excellent imagery that portrays vivid illustrations in ones mind that enhances, A Rose for Emily. The following paragraphs will demonstrate how Faulkner uses imagery to illustrate descriptive pictures of people, places and things that allow Faulkner to titillate the senses. It was a big, squarish frame house that had once been white, decorated with cupolas and spires and scrolled ba ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, rose for emily, short story, william faulkner
  • Age Of Innocence - 1,264 words
    Age Of Innocence Although Martin Scorcese does not sound like the logical choice to direct an adaptation of Edith Wharton's novel about manners and morals in New York's society in the 1980's the psychological violence inflicted between characters is at least as damaging as the physical violence perpetrated by Scorcese's usual gangsters. Martin Scorcese has made a reputation of conveying the essence of the human spirit through visuals and vivid colors. His work in "The Age of Innocence" is no different. Scorcese closely observed the tiny details of the world and the impossible situation within the novel. The film stays remarkable true to the Wharton novel, fleshing out details and bringing th ...
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  • Alfred Housman - 1,661 words
    Alfred Housman Alfred Edward Housman, a classical scholar and poet, was born in Fockbury in the county of Worcestershire, England on March 26, 1859. His poems are variations on the themes of mortality and the miseries of human condition (Magill 1411). Most of Housmans poems were written in the 1890s when he was under great psychological stress, which made the tone of his poems characteristically mournful and the mood dispirited (Magill 1411). "In the world of Housmans poetry, youth fades to dust, lovers are unfaithful, and death is the tranquil end of everything (Magill 1412)." Throughout his life, Housman faced many hardships. The loss of his mother at age 12 shattered his childhood and lef ...
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  • Alice In Wonderland - 1,801 words
    Alice In Wonderland Finding the Child in Us All Lewis Carroll's classic Alice's Adventures in Wonderland has entertained not only children but adults for over one hundred years. The tale has become a treasure of philosophers, literary critics, psychoanalysts, and linguists. It also has attracted Carroll's fellow mathematicians and logicians. There appears to be something in Alice for everyone, and there are almost as many explanations of the work as there are commentators. It may be perhaps Carroll's fantastical style of writing that entertains the reader, rather than teaching them a lesson as was customary in his time. Heavy literary symbolism is difficult to trace through his works because ...
    Related: alice, alice in wonderland, wonderland, nineteenth century, young adult
  • Alices Adventures In Wonderland - 1,690 words
    Alice's Adventures In Wonderland An analysis of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland The following text is a small part of a project from: Jerry Maatta, HII, Katedralskolan, Uppsala, Sweden Written in March 1997 Interpretations and opinions It is important to bear in mind that Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, however special it may seem and however many different interpretations one thinks one can find, is, after all, but a story written to entertain Charles Dodgson's favourite child-friends. It is very obvious in the story that it was written for the three Liddell girls, of whom Alice was the closest to Dodgson. In the introductory poem to the tale, there are clear indications to the three, th ...
    Related: wonderland, the girl, young girl, different forms, grief
  • Americas Tv Role Model - 1,971 words
    Americas Tv Role Model Americas TV Role Model What America needs is a family like The Waltons, not families like The Simpsons - at least according to President George Bush. A strange remark, given that one does not normally expect the President of the United States to pass judgments on television dramas like The Waltons, let along cartoon shows like The Simpsons. The producers of The Simpsons were quick to respond, by making Bart Simpson remark that the Simpson family was really just like the Waltons family - waiting for the end of the depression. The Waltons were an imaginary rural family waiting for the 30s depression to end, while The Simpsons are a postmodern family of today. Both belong ...
    Related: americas, role model, female characters, music hall, intro
  • Amy Lowells Patterns - 522 words
    Amy LowellS Patterns On the outside, the speaker in Amy Lowell's "Patterns" acts the way Victorian society expects of her. However, on the inside, she expresses her emotions and what she truly feels. The speaker is confined to each "button, hook, and lace" of society's values. When confronted with an emotional situation, she bottles her feelings and only confesses them to herself. The "patterns" serve as guidelines for the speaker's life. The speaker is constantly bombarded by what Victorian society expects of her. Her "stiff, brocaded gown" serves as a stand to hold her up. Without it, she would crumble with emotion. She mustn't show any form of feeling, so she feels as if there is "not a s ...
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  • Ancient Roman Marriages - 1,257 words
    Ancient Roman Marriages Marriages in matrimonium iustum (a legal union) had three requirements: both partners must have coniubium, and age and consent. A valid marriage was very important because it would affect the inheritance rights of both the children produced and husband to wife/wife to husband inheritance. Coniubium was the right to marry (described further in the following section). Age refers to the fact the couple is expected to have reached puberty. Also it was acceptable for a man to marry a girl young enough to be his daughter or even granddaughter, but it was dishonorable if a woman married a younger man. Consent refers to the fact the final decision was ultimately up to the pat ...
    Related: ancient roman, roman, more important, first year, penny
  • Anthropologists - 334 words
    Anthropologists Anthropologists trace the origin and evolutionary development of the human race through the study of changing physical characteristics and cultural and social institutions. Anthropological data, including that acquired by archeological techniques, may be applied to solving problems in human relations such as race and ethnic relations and education. People have always been interested in their past history. Although anthropology dates back to Aristotle, it is a commonly accepted fact that it became an established science during the Victorian era or the era of exploration. Anthropology has developed slowly since then with little real development until the 1930's when the use of ...
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