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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: birth weight

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  • Adhd - 931 words
    Adhd Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common mental disorders among children. About 3 percent to 5 percent of American children are affected by this disorder. This disorder is commonly mis-diagnosed in children who are very hyperactive, assuming that very hyperactive kids have this disorder. In this paper I plan to discuss ideas such as: the symptoms, theories of causation, risks, and how this disorder is looked at and treated. There are signs that a child may be affected by ADHD, which are very noticeable in some cases. Some of the physical symptoms that are involved include hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsitiv ...
    Related: adhd, television watching, hyperactivity disorder, food additives, complicated
  • Alcoholism Pros And Cons - 1,031 words
    Alcoholism - Pros and Cons The following essay will introduce you to pros and cons of drinking. It will also give you a clear understanding in why you shouldnt drink alcohol. Alcohol is a depressant; it impairs your ability to drive, slows down your reaction time and causes you to make some risky decisions that you wouldnt normally take. This essay will also help you comprehend how and why things happen, because of alcohol. Alcoholism can kill in many different ways, and in general, people who drink regularly have a higher rate of deaths from injury, violence, and some cancers. The earlier a person begins drinking heavily, the greater their chance of developing serious illnesses later on. An ...
    Related: alcoholism, cons, pros, violent behavior, alcohol syndrome
  • An Estimated 146,000 Americans Died Of Lung Cancer In 1992, And 90 Percent Of These Deaths Were Caused By Cigarette Smoking S - 421 words
    An estimated 146,000 Americans died of lung cancer in 1992, and 90 percent of these deaths were caused by cigarette smoking. Smoking is responsible for about 30 percent of all cancer deaths annually in the United States more than 155,000 each year. If smoking-related cancers could be eliminated from our society, we would see a significant decline in the annual cancer death rate instead of small but steady increases. Since 1964, the year of the Surgeon General's first report on the health risks of cigarette smoking, strong evidence of the association between smoking and cancer has accumulated. Countless studies have proved that smoking causes lung cancer, and we now know that it substantially ...
    Related: cancer, cigarette, cigarette smoking, lung, lung cancer, quit smoking, smoking
  • Child Development - 1,588 words
    Child Development Babies grow and develop at a very rapid rate during the first year of life. They grow physically, mentally, emotionally, and socially. In this paper I will discuss the physical growth and development patterns of an infant all the way through adulthood. Development is the baby's increased skill in using various body parts. When dealing with a development of a child there are three basic development rules. First development rule: This rule says that babies develop in the head region first, then the trunk, and lastly in the legs and feet. For example, a baby can hold up their head before they can grasp an object with their hand. Also they can feed themselves before they can wa ...
    Related: adolescent development, human development, young child, birth weight, young woman
  • Childhood Education And Social Inequalities - 1,136 words
    Childhood Education And Social Inequalities Early Childhood Development and Social Inequalities By All families should have the same opportunities to live a descent life. But due to the backgrounds of some families, and children, they may not have a chance for this. There are certain risk factors that have a bearing on social inequalities in health, and particularly those that are prone to preventative intervention. There are many that I could talk about, but I have picked out four of these factors to talk about. They are biological factors, family and social factors, parenting factors, and attachment. Even these I feel that I will not be able to cover completely, because there is only a cer ...
    Related: childhood development, childhood education, early childhood, social class, social development, social factors, social inequality
  • Childhood Poverty - 1,581 words
    Childhood Poverty Childhood Poverty We as Americans are extremely lucky. We live in a big country with many resources and almost all the luxuries we ever wanted. On the flip side, in America there are also many people who do not have these privileges. The lower class is a struggling class. For many years, people have been trying to pull themselves up from the lower class and the majority does not succeed. Childhood poverty is a large problem in the U.S. It is said that the poorest people in the United States are the children of the lower class. Childhood poverty could lead to a number of problems such as hunger, violence, physical and mental disabilities, educational problems, homelessness, ...
    Related: poverty, high school, health status, lead poisoning, option
  • Eating Disorders - 1,335 words
    ... y risk their lives. There is no guarantee that after surgery the fat won't come back (Guerra 112). There is no way of knowing how one's body is going to heal after cosmetic surgery, and the surgery often ends in disappointment, depression, or even more cosmetic surgery to fix the scars and unexpected flaws that the first surgery has left. Swelling can also occur for up to six weeks. The possibility of bleeding, bruising, infection and scarring are also some of the risks of liposuction (Ashton 121). Infections, wound disruptions, and erosion of overlying skin are a routine byproduct of any operation. Scar tissue can harden and darken. There is no way to prevent this kind of disfigurement ...
    Related: disorders, eating disorder, eating disorders, york routledge, support groups
  • Emotional And Physical Development In Children - 1,299 words
    Emotional And Physical Development In Children Emotional and Physical Development in Children Infants grow at a very rapid rate during the first one and a half years of life. Their development is not only physical, it is also mental, emotionally, and social. These developments are the blue prints for further development in life. During development, there are three basic developmental laws. The first one is the babys development in the head region, followed by the upper body, followed by the trunk portion, and lastly the legs and feet. For example, a baby can hold up their heads first before they can grab an object with their hand. The second law is the babys motor skills. Motor skills are th ...
    Related: moral development, physical development, social development, motor skills, control movement
  • Environmental Hazards Which Effect Pregnacy - 1,063 words
    Environmental Hazards Which Effect Pregnacy Environmental Hazards That Effect Pregnancy Did you know that 30 to 80 percent of all conceptions end in miscarriages, stillbirth or early infant death? And that mens sperm counts have gone down by 40 percent during the last thirty years? There are many reasons that these things happen. Most of these factors to a healthy birth have to do with the environment. Some examples include radiation, viruses, drugs and chemicals. These are the cause of 5 to 11 percent to birth defects and can cause miscarriages. Toxic substances come in many forms. You should know the different forms to look out for. There are hazardous vapors such as the fumes that come fr ...
    Related: environmental, environmental hazards, different forms, reproductive system, bigger
  • Everything You Need To Know About Iron - 679 words
    Everything You Need To Know About Iron Everything You Need to Know About Iron Iron is called a trace mineral, but its effects are mighty. We need it to produce hemoglobin, the oxygen carrier in red blood cells that brings oxygen to the rest of the body. Iron is also needed to produce myoglobin, the oxygen reservoir in the muscle cells. Iron is notoriously low in the American diet; especially in children one to two years old, and in women ages 12 to 50. Surprisingly, it is also low among athletes, who pack their diets so full of carbohydrates that they tend to omit iron-rich foods. Inadequate iron stores in the blood cause iron deficiency anemia. Iron is needed for the production of hemoglobi ...
    Related: iron, iron deficiency anemia, first half, pregnant women, inadequate
  • Fetal Abuse - 1,408 words
    Fetal Abuse Fetal Abuse When I was a senior in high school one of my classmates was pregnant and abusing cocaine during her whole pregnancy. This upset me so greatly and it still does today when I think about it. I felt angry with the mother, concerned and scared for the child, and I also felt confused about exactly what consequences the mother would face if anyone ever found out. Chapter fourteen in our textbook covers "Fetal Abuse": The Case of Drug-Exposed Infants, so naturally I became very interested on the subject. One of the issues brought up is criminal court response and whether the use of illegal drugs during pregnancy should be prosecuted. This is a controversial issue in our soci ...
    Related: abuse, abuse prevention, alcohol abuse, child abuse, drug abuse, drug and alcohol abuse, fetal
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 460 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome In one week 10,000 babies are born in Canada. Twenty are born with Fetal Alcohol syndrome (FAS). One hundred with other alcohol related birth defects. FAS is most often described as the leading cause of mental retardation. FAS is not genetic or inherited and is %100 preventable. Fetal Alcohol syndrome refers to a constellation of physical and mental birth defects that may develop in individuals whose mothers consumed alcohol during pregnancy. It is an organic disease that is characterized by central nervous system involvement, growth retardation, and characteristic facial features. Prenatal alcohol exposure also causes malformation of major organs including heart, kidn ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol syndrome, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome, prenatal alcohol exposure, syndrome
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 1,797 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is a condition affecting children born to women who drink heavily during pregnancy. There are three criteria used to describe the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure and to make a diagnosis of FAS. The first of these is a pattern of facial anomalies, these features include:  Small eye openings  Flat cheekbones  Flattened groove between nose and upper lip  Thin upper lip These characteristics can gradually diminish as the child ages, but it is important to note that diagnosis does not change because of this. The second criteria is growth deficiencies:  Low birth weight  Decelerating weight ove ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol and drugs, alcohol syndrome, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome, prenatal alcohol exposure
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 1,147 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects is a problem running rampant and out of control all across America. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is the effect of pregnant women-drinking alcohol. Through education, we can eradicate this expensive and debilitating disease that is plaguing our children and our country. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome was first diagnosed about 25 years ago. A group of doctors at the University of Washington in Seattle corned the term Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in 1973 (Dorris 143). Prior to this Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects children were misdiagnosed as problem children or Learning Disabled. Some were mistaken for bad kids ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol consumption, alcohol syndrome, drink alcohol, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome
  • Human Growth And Development - 1,193 words
    ... tic, scrupulous, and persevering. 77. continuity theory: view that people tend to cope with daily life in late adulthood in essentially the same ways they coped in earlier periods of life. 78. continuity- discontinuity issue: issue concerned with whether a developmental phenomenon follows a smooth progression throughout the life span or a series of abrupt shifts. 79. conventional level: second level of reasoning in Kholbergs theory, where moral reasoning is based on societys norms. 80. convergent thinking: using information to arrive at one standard and correct answer. 81. cooing: early vowel-like sounds that babies produce. 82. cooperative play: play that is organized around a theme, wi ...
    Related: career development, human development, human growth, moral reasoning, point of view
  • Hungry Children - 626 words
    Hungry Children Some of the most preventable diseases known to humans is hate and gender differences along with emotional distress which continues to breed hunger and infect humankind. There will be a time when we will have to have a respect for all humans and provide equal access to food and the resources by which to be able to obtain nourishment or hunger will continue to be a problem. Like history dictates, it usually will require a disaster before we consider a transformation, which is a concept that each person is going to have to realize to end hunger. To give an example of how much U.S citizens do not spend on aid for the hungry children; consider this in 1991 we spent three times as ...
    Related: hungry, hungry children, gender differences, birth weight, steadily
  • Influences On Normal Physical - 1,230 words
    Influences On Normal Physical Physical growth in early childhood is partially easy to measure and gives an idea of how children normally develop during this period. The average child in North America is less than three feet tall at two years of age. Physical growth contains no discrete stages, plateaus, or qualitative changes. Large differences may develop between individual children and among groups of children. Sometimes these differences affect the psychological development of young children. These differences create a nice variety among children. Most dimensions of growth are influenced by the child's genetic background. Also, races and ethnic backgrounds around the world differ in growt ...
    Related: influences, physical growth, mentally retarded, preschool years, selective
  • Intelligence And Society - 1,679 words
    Intelligence And Society Intelligence In society, people base their life on intelligence. They do everything possible to get ahead in life. To get ahead, they cheat each other, back stab, and commit many sinful acts. Also, they educate themselves so they are capable of doing whatever is required of them. Society is trying to always make themselves smarter. Are they trying to change something that they have no control over though? Intelligence is something that everybody has, but is something that is developed over time. The development of intelligence has many items that play a factor. For instance, environment and heredity both play a role in developing a person's I.Q. "Each of us are born ...
    Related: intelligence, intelligence testing, university press, early childhood, determining
  • Intelligence: Genetic And Environmental Factors - 1,957 words
    ... ay not be passed down because they are broken up at meiosis and a new genotype is formed at conception. One of the consequences of the Human Genome Project, tasked with sequencing the entire human complement of DNA, is a public perception that scientists are developing a molecular understanding of the human condition. Seldom a month goes by without a media article trumpeting a new genetic link to a behavior or disease. Everything from schizophrenia to television watching is postulated to be linked to genetics, yet scientists are a long way from being able to explain the ramifications of the human genome sequence. Kaye (1992) suggests that phrasing used by the media such as gene for alcoh ...
    Related: biological factors, cultural factors, environmental, environmental factors, environmental influences, genetic
  • Is The Gulf War Syndrome Real - 1,034 words
    Is The Gulf War Syndrome Real? Is the Gulf War Syndrome Real? On August 2, 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait. The United States government acted very quickly. Ships were dispatched to the Persian Gulf, and oil prices shot up as and oil embargo was placed against Iraq. The U.S. government told us that Saddam Hussein was poised to invade the neighboring countries, including Saudi Arabia, and the worlds oil supply was threatened. George Bush launched operation Desert Shield in which a coalition of many nation's armies gathered in the deserts of Saudi Arabia bordering Iraq and Kuwait. As the war began, the coalition of national armies assembled in Saudi Arabia took a few SCUD missile shots fired from Ir ...
    Related: gulf, gulf war, persian gulf, syndrome, u.s. government
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