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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: utopian society

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  • America Land Of The Free And Home Of The Brave The Utopian Society Which Every European Citizen Desired To Be A Part Of In Th - 3,033 words
    America... land of the free and home of the brave; the utopian society which every European citizen desired to be a part of in the 18th and 19th centuries. The revolutionary ideas of The Age of Enlightenment such as democracy and universal male suffrage were finally becoming a reality to the philosophers and scholars that so elegantly dreamt of them. America was a playground for the ideas of these enlightened men. To Europeans, and the world for that matter, America had become a kind of mirage, an idealistic version of society, a place of open opportunities. Where else on earth could a man like J. D. Rockefeller rise from the streets to one of the richest men of his time? America stood for i ...
    Related: america, brave, century america, citizen, southern society, utopian, utopian society
  • America Land Of The Free And Home Of The Brave The Utopian Society Which Every European Citizen Desired To Be A Part Of In Th - 3,093 words
    ... two boys are collecting supplies for Toms gang is another example of Toms conformity to society. Huck Fink has been taught by Pap to simply "borrow" things. Tom could not stand to do this. When Tom and Huck take the candles from Miss Watson, "Tom laid five cents on the table for pay" where Huck would have simply "borrowed" them (HF 6). This shows the striking contrast of the two characters and their views of the world. Tom Sawyer also represents the cruelties and evils that characters such as Pap and the Grangerfords displayed. In his discussion of the cruelties of the society that Huck finds himself in, Cox states that "all the other cruelties are committed for some reason for honor, m ...
    Related: america, american society, brave, citizen, southern society, utopian, utopian society
  • Undoubtedly, The Thought Of Living In, Or Forming A Utopian Society Has Flashed Through Every Persons Mind, A Few People Have - 1,301 words
    Undoubtedly, the thought of living in, or forming a utopian society has flashed through every persons mind, a few people have even tried to make this ideal dream society a reality. Unfortunately, within the pursuit of these societies the leaders become corrupt and begin to become paranoid with the fear of rebellion. Hundreds were murdered under the reigns of Adolph Hitler and Joseph Stalin in what they considered measures to maintain peace and stability, one must also consider the hardships that the citizens were forced to endure while living under these oppressive governments. This dream of forming and maintaining a utopian society was immortalized in two novels dealing with the same basic ...
    Related: forming, future society, utopian, utopian society, aldous huxley
  • Utopian Society - 1,627 words
    Utopian Society According to the curriculum of our Athens to New York course, we are supposed to study certain themes that are carried through history and literary works of various eras. In addition, there are some recurring themes that also become evident, especially in some of the more recent works that we have studied. Works like Cornel West's Race Matters, Elie Wiesel's Night, and Franz Kafka's The Trial, carry many similar themes, and teach us readers some important lessons about ourselves as the human race. Through each work's message, we can study "what it means to be: human, a member of a community, and moral, ethical, or just, as well as how individuals respond to differences in rac ...
    Related: utopian, utopian society, health care, elie wiesel, defend
  • Utopian Society - 604 words
    Utopian Society The utopian society in The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood is very different from what most people would consider a utopian society. The power of this society rests upon a small percentage of the population. In this society, men are superior to the women. Women have virtually no rights or say in what goes on in their lives and women with rights are only a few. This society was created by a powerful few who were able to overthrow the government by killing the president and congress. These people then suspended everyones constitutional rights and used terror to stop anyone or group from threatening their control. Then they took control over women by stopping their rights to o ...
    Related: american society, utopian, utopian society, margaret atwood, handmaids tale
  • Utopian Society The Giver - 366 words
    Utopian Society - The Giver What would your life be like in a utopian society? Jonas knows what it is like. He has lived in one for twelve years. At the age of twelve he is chosen to be the Receiver. + Through the essay one will be aware of the memories Jonas received, the results of the memories, and the wisdom he gained as a result of the memories. Memories play an important role in The Giver. For example, this is the first memory Jonas received: Then he shivered. He realized that the touch of the hands felt, suddenly cold. At the same instant, breathing in, he felt the air change, and his very breath was cold.(p.80) This was the memory of a sled ride in the snow. Although this memory is h ...
    Related: giver, the giver, utopian, utopian society, important role
  • 1984 - 661 words
    1984 1984 as an Anti-Utopian Novel A utopia is an ideal or perfect community. While some writers have created fictional places that embody their ideals societies, other writers have written satires that ridicule existing conditions of society, or anti-utopias, which show possible future societies that are anything but ideal. In 1984 , George Orwell presents a terrifying picture of future as life under the constant surveillance of Big Brother. This book 1984 is an anti-utopian novel. The main character Winston Smith lives in the large political country Oceania, which is eternally at war with one of two huge countries, Eurasia and Eastasia. At any moment all existing records show either that O ...
    Related: 1984, love affair, works cited, george orwell, affair
  • 1984 - 249 words
    1984 The lesson to be learned from George Orwell's 1984 is that an "ideal" of having a Utopian society will never really work. George Orwell may have written 1984, in order to show us that every society has it's ups and downs and that no matter how hard you work to keep the society perfect there will always be flaws. In the book 1984, the society in which the people lived was completely opposite to what most people would see as "utopia". As defined by the New Scholastic Dictionary the word "Utopia" means: a place where everything is perfect and everyone is happy. This is far from the life that the people lived in 1984. There was a lot of hate throughout the book, and with hate comes unhappin ...
    Related: 1984, utopian society, main character, george orwell, lesson
  • 1984 - 1,513 words
    1984 Nineteen Eighty-Four is a compelling novel, written in the period just after W.W.II. It details the life of one man, Winston Smith, and his struggles with an undoubtedly fascist government. The book is set approximately in the year 1984, in which Winston's society is ruled by a governing force known as The Party. At the head of this government is a fictional figure known as Big Brother, to whom all citizens must love and respect. In this society, privacy and freedom do not exist. People are constantly monitored by telescreens, and subjected to a constant barrage of propaganda. Any devious thought or action is dealt with by cruel and deadly punishment. Winston is a worker in one of the g ...
    Related: 1984, government agencies, specific purpose, big brother, history
  • 1984 And Brave New World - 1,196 words
    1984 And Brave New World In Orwells Nineteen Eighty-Four and Huxleys Brave New World, the authoritative figures strive for freedom, peace, and stability for all, to develop a utopian society. The Utopian society strives for a perfect state of well-being for all persons in the community, and over-emphasizes this factor, where no person is exposed to the reality of the world. As each novel progresses we see that neither society possesses family values nor attempts to practice them. Neither are passionate nor creative in factors such as love, language, history and literature. Our society today, in general, is unsure about the future: The nightmare of total organization has emerged from the safe ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, society today, aldous huxley
  • 1984 And Brave New World - 1,196 words
    ... hidden beneath the dark mustache. O cruel, needless misunderstanding! O stubborn, self-willed exile from the loving breast! Two gin-scented tears trickled down the sides of his nose. But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother. This shows the power that the Party and OBrien has had over Winston; they have taken his old understanding and beliefs and transformed them into an attitude that complies with those of the Party. The conditioning of an individual for a utopian society often results in the repression of individuality. Both novels attempt to create a utopian society. The major thing that holds t ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, utopian society, breast feeding
  • 1984: A Bleak Prediction Of The Future - 1,222 words
    1984: A Bleak Prediction Of The Future Nineteen Eighty-Four was written by a major contributor to anticommunist literature around the World War II period, and is one of the greatest stories of an anti-utopian society ever. Nineteen Eighty-Four was not written solely as an entertaining piece of literature or as a dream of what the future could be like, it was written as a warning of what could happen as a result of communism and totalitarianism. This was not necessarily a widely popular vision of the future at the time of publication, but it was certainly considered a possibility by many people. The popular vision of the future, if analyzed as from a character in the book's point of view, som ...
    Related: bleak, prediction, television shows, big brother, orgasm
  • Americans:the Colonial Experience - 1,599 words
    Americans:The Colonial Experience The Americans: The Colonial Experience America was not believed to be a ground for a utopian society, rather a place for a new start, more freedom, and fewer taxes. The initial group to settle the New World were the Puritans, separatists making a hopeless attempt to try to purify the Church of England by swearing loyalty to the group instead of the king. This all takes place during the 17th and 18th centuries. The following topics that will be discussed are intended to portray all of the different aspects of colonial American social and governmental tendencies. The impression that Boorstin has hidden in the context of the book is that of the portrayal of the ...
    Related: colonial, colonial period, colonial times, atlantic ocean, school system
  • Analysis Of The Time Machine - 1,239 words
    Analysis Of The Time Machine The Time Machine by H.G. Wells is considered a "classic" in today's literary community. I also believe that this novel is a good book. It was an interesting story the first time I studied it, and I have found new ideas each time I have read it since. It is amazing that such a simple narrative could have so many complex ideas. Unfortunately, some do not take the same position that I do. They cast it off as a silly little novel that deserves no merit. Obviously I disagree with these critics. The Time Machine follows the criteria that I believe a good novel should have. A good novel should include an element of fantasy and should stimulate ideas in the audience that ...
    Related: machine, time machine, good book, modern society, progressive
  • Anarchism And Liberalism - 1,399 words
    ... st groups to represent the labor force, minority groups, and any apathetic and helpless citizens. The presence of sub-government groups, such as big industry, are recognized as being insufficient in representing the public's interest and so the liberals call for more regulations to control these sub-governments from abusing their power. This goes right along with the whole philosophy of contemporary liberals in that they don't want to start over and rebuild the government, but rather reform it and ad more regulations to control it. The idea of a ruler goes against the basic stance of anarchism. Proudhon best describes this view when he said, "Whoever puts his hand on me to govern me is u ...
    Related: anarchism, contemporary liberalism, liberalism, free society, individual rights
  • Anarchy - 1,645 words
    Anarchy Anarchism seems to be defined many ways by many different sources. Most dictionary definitions define anarchism as the absence of government. A leading modern dictionary, Webster's Third International Dictionary, defines anarchism briefly but accurately as, "a political theory opposed to all forms of government and governmental restraint and advocating voluntary cooperation and free association of individuals and groups in order to satisfy their needs." Other dictionaries describe anarchism with similar definitions. The Britannica-Webster dictionary defines the word anarchism as, "a political theory that holds all government authority to be unnecessary and undesirable and advocates a ...
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  • Are We Democratic - 945 words
    Are We Democratic? National American Government April 20, 2000 In the first essay written by Howard Zinn he tries to answer the question of "How Democratic Is America?". He seems to know what he is talking a great deal about government but it seems like anybody can just talk about how our government works and to say that that is the definition of democracy. The only thing he did differently was using an increase in vocabulary and try to talk about the same thing over and over again. Where Zinn could have said that democracy not only requires formal system of government equality to all Americans. But Americans are not the only ones who deserve this kind of treatment. Everybody from all walks ...
    Related: democratic national, democratic society, howard zinn, american government, founding
  • Ask Most Americans Who Jeanpaul Sartre Is And You Will Most Likely Get A Frowned Look According To Journalist, Richard Eyre, - 750 words
    Ask most Americans who Jean-Paul Sartre is and you will most likely get a frowned look. According to journalist, Richard Eyre, in this country, Sartre is perhaps as unfashionable as loon pants. That is in part because Sartre, albeit a great French philosopher, didnt have a poster status. Sartre was not a particularly attractive man and although he was the darling of the 60s in all of Europe, his pipe, glasses and an air of bad temper kept him off walls that celebrated the Brigitte Bardots and the James Deans. Furthermore, Sartre was not always an easy man to understand. His writings are not particularly fanciful and he doesnt necessarily care to engage the reader by painting pretty pictures ...
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  • Brave New World - 1,458 words
    Brave New World Book Report of 'Brave New World' By Michael Tillman Theme: The theme of Brave New World is freedom and how people want it. The people want poetry, danger, good and bad things. This novel shows that when you must give up religion, high art, true science, family, love and other foundations of modern life in place of a sort of unending happiness, it is not worth the sacrifice. These are all also distinguishing marks between humans and animals that were abolished here. In exchange, they received stability with no wars, social unrest, no poverty or disease or any other infirmities or discomforts. However, they only live with an artificial happiness, which they have been brainwashe ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, world book, mustapha mond, central london
  • Brave New World - 548 words
    Brave New World Aldous Huxley's Brave New World was published in 1946. During this time, socialism and dictatorships were the concepts of the day. These governments believed that having total power would engender a perfect society. Karl Marx (Bernard Marx), Nikolai Lenin (Lenina), and Benito Mussolini (Benito Hoover) are three men who decided to pursue this concept. Through these examples of socialism and dictatorship, it is seen that having a government that completely controls a nation, will fail. Many of the ideas that these governments thought would contribute to its success were the cause of its failure. Although technological advances, sexual promiscuity, and conformity contribute to t ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, world aldous huxley, world state, book reports
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