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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: utopian

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  • America Land Of The Free And Home Of The Brave The Utopian Society Which Every European Citizen Desired To Be A Part Of In Th - 3,033 words
    America... land of the free and home of the brave; the utopian society which every European citizen desired to be a part of in the 18th and 19th centuries. The revolutionary ideas of The Age of Enlightenment such as democracy and universal male suffrage were finally becoming a reality to the philosophers and scholars that so elegantly dreamt of them. America was a playground for the ideas of these enlightened men. To Europeans, and the world for that matter, America had become a kind of mirage, an idealistic version of society, a place of open opportunities. Where else on earth could a man like J. D. Rockefeller rise from the streets to one of the richest men of his time? America stood for i ...
    Related: america, brave, century america, citizen, southern society, utopian, utopian society
  • America Land Of The Free And Home Of The Brave The Utopian Society Which Every European Citizen Desired To Be A Part Of In Th - 3,093 words
    ... two boys are collecting supplies for Toms gang is another example of Toms conformity to society. Huck Fink has been taught by Pap to simply "borrow" things. Tom could not stand to do this. When Tom and Huck take the candles from Miss Watson, "Tom laid five cents on the table for pay" where Huck would have simply "borrowed" them (HF 6). This shows the striking contrast of the two characters and their views of the world. Tom Sawyer also represents the cruelties and evils that characters such as Pap and the Grangerfords displayed. In his discussion of the cruelties of the society that Huck finds himself in, Cox states that "all the other cruelties are committed for some reason for honor, m ...
    Related: america, american society, brave, citizen, southern society, utopian, utopian society
  • Classical Economists Vs Utopian Socialists - 1,602 words
    Classical Economists Vs Utopian Socialists There are many ways that to govern a country. Obviously, officials run most countries, but what kind of system do they govern by? Some of the most important systems used today are capitalism, socialism, and communism. As a coherent economic theory, classical economics start with Smith, continues with the British Economists Thomas Robert Malthus and David Ricardo. Although differences of opinion were numerous among the classical economists in the time span between Smiths Wealth of Nations and Ricardos Principles of Political Economy and Taxation, they all mainly agreed on major principles. All believed in private property, free markets, and, in Smith ...
    Related: classical, classical economics, classical theory, economists, utopian
  • Undoubtedly, The Thought Of Living In, Or Forming A Utopian Society Has Flashed Through Every Persons Mind, A Few People Have - 1,301 words
    Undoubtedly, the thought of living in, or forming a utopian society has flashed through every persons mind, a few people have even tried to make this ideal dream society a reality. Unfortunately, within the pursuit of these societies the leaders become corrupt and begin to become paranoid with the fear of rebellion. Hundreds were murdered under the reigns of Adolph Hitler and Joseph Stalin in what they considered measures to maintain peace and stability, one must also consider the hardships that the citizens were forced to endure while living under these oppressive governments. This dream of forming and maintaining a utopian society was immortalized in two novels dealing with the same basic ...
    Related: forming, future society, utopian, utopian society, aldous huxley
  • Utopian Society - 1,627 words
    Utopian Society According to the curriculum of our Athens to New York course, we are supposed to study certain themes that are carried through history and literary works of various eras. In addition, there are some recurring themes that also become evident, especially in some of the more recent works that we have studied. Works like Cornel West's Race Matters, Elie Wiesel's Night, and Franz Kafka's The Trial, carry many similar themes, and teach us readers some important lessons about ourselves as the human race. Through each work's message, we can study "what it means to be: human, a member of a community, and moral, ethical, or just, as well as how individuals respond to differences in rac ...
    Related: utopian, utopian society, health care, elie wiesel, defend
  • Utopian Society - 604 words
    Utopian Society The utopian society in The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood is very different from what most people would consider a utopian society. The power of this society rests upon a small percentage of the population. In this society, men are superior to the women. Women have virtually no rights or say in what goes on in their lives and women with rights are only a few. This society was created by a powerful few who were able to overthrow the government by killing the president and congress. These people then suspended everyones constitutional rights and used terror to stop anyone or group from threatening their control. Then they took control over women by stopping their rights to o ...
    Related: american society, utopian, utopian society, margaret atwood, handmaids tale
  • Utopian Society The Giver - 366 words
    Utopian Society - The Giver What would your life be like in a utopian society? Jonas knows what it is like. He has lived in one for twelve years. At the age of twelve he is chosen to be the Receiver. + Through the essay one will be aware of the memories Jonas received, the results of the memories, and the wisdom he gained as a result of the memories. Memories play an important role in The Giver. For example, this is the first memory Jonas received: Then he shivered. He realized that the touch of the hands felt, suddenly cold. At the same instant, breathing in, he felt the air change, and his very breath was cold.(p.80) This was the memory of a sled ride in the snow. Although this memory is h ...
    Related: giver, the giver, utopian, utopian society, important role
  • 1984 - 1,273 words
    1984 Jean-Marie Lauria Professor Rednour Western Enlightenment April 20, 2001 Tyrants, Communism, Big Brother, Stalin, and 1984 In George Orwells, 1984, no individual freedoms are present. It mirrors mid twentieth century Europe during World War II and its affects. Winston the main character who is a 39-year-old man, was neither remarkable in intelligence nor character, but is disgusted with the world he lives in. He works in the Ministry of Truth, where history and the truth are rewritten to fit the party's beliefs. This is an example of the use of propaganda to fit the need of the government during World War Two. Winston is aware of the falsehoods, because it is his job to make them true. ...
    Related: 1984, love affair, third stage, century europe, smith
  • 1984 - 1,219 words
    ... statements that change every day. The other reason for the diary is so that in the future, people will be able to read what really, and to inform them about beliefs on the party. Like Winston, I believe George Orwell wrote 1984 in order to allow a communist country to be revealed, the Soviet Union. Orwells goal was to expose the falsehoods of the Soviet Union as the model of a socialist state. He also wanted to reveal the dangers of totalitarianism, the deterioration of objective truth, and the well thought-out manipulation of Oceanias common peoples through propaganda. The Ministry of Truth is where history and facts both significant and insignificant are rewritten to reflect the party' ...
    Related: 1984, critical essays, power over, winston smith, scare
  • 1984 - 661 words
    1984 1984 as an Anti-Utopian Novel A utopia is an ideal or perfect community. While some writers have created fictional places that embody their ideals societies, other writers have written satires that ridicule existing conditions of society, or anti-utopias, which show possible future societies that are anything but ideal. In 1984 , George Orwell presents a terrifying picture of future as life under the constant surveillance of Big Brother. This book 1984 is an anti-utopian novel. The main character Winston Smith lives in the large political country Oceania, which is eternally at war with one of two huge countries, Eurasia and Eastasia. At any moment all existing records show either that O ...
    Related: 1984, love affair, works cited, george orwell, affair
  • 1984 - 249 words
    1984 The lesson to be learned from George Orwell's 1984 is that an "ideal" of having a Utopian society will never really work. George Orwell may have written 1984, in order to show us that every society has it's ups and downs and that no matter how hard you work to keep the society perfect there will always be flaws. In the book 1984, the society in which the people lived was completely opposite to what most people would see as "utopia". As defined by the New Scholastic Dictionary the word "Utopia" means: a place where everything is perfect and everyone is happy. This is far from the life that the people lived in 1984. There was a lot of hate throughout the book, and with hate comes unhappin ...
    Related: 1984, utopian society, main character, george orwell, lesson
  • 1984 - 1,513 words
    1984 Nineteen Eighty-Four is a compelling novel, written in the period just after W.W.II. It details the life of one man, Winston Smith, and his struggles with an undoubtedly fascist government. The book is set approximately in the year 1984, in which Winston's society is ruled by a governing force known as The Party. At the head of this government is a fictional figure known as Big Brother, to whom all citizens must love and respect. In this society, privacy and freedom do not exist. People are constantly monitored by telescreens, and subjected to a constant barrage of propaganda. Any devious thought or action is dealt with by cruel and deadly punishment. Winston is a worker in one of the g ...
    Related: 1984, government agencies, specific purpose, big brother, history
  • 1984 And Brave New World - 1,196 words
    1984 And Brave New World In Orwells Nineteen Eighty-Four and Huxleys Brave New World, the authoritative figures strive for freedom, peace, and stability for all, to develop a utopian society. The Utopian society strives for a perfect state of well-being for all persons in the community, and over-emphasizes this factor, where no person is exposed to the reality of the world. As each novel progresses we see that neither society possesses family values nor attempts to practice them. Neither are passionate nor creative in factors such as love, language, history and literature. Our society today, in general, is unsure about the future: The nightmare of total organization has emerged from the safe ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, society today, aldous huxley
  • 1984 And Brave New World - 1,196 words
    ... hidden beneath the dark mustache. O cruel, needless misunderstanding! O stubborn, self-willed exile from the loving breast! Two gin-scented tears trickled down the sides of his nose. But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother. This shows the power that the Party and OBrien has had over Winston; they have taken his old understanding and beliefs and transformed them into an attitude that complies with those of the Party. The conditioning of an individual for a utopian society often results in the repression of individuality. Both novels attempt to create a utopian society. The major thing that holds t ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, utopian society, breast feeding
  • 1984 By George Orwell - 983 words
    1984 By George Orwell "War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength." This is the slogan of the Ministry of Truth, a branch of the totalitarian government in post-war London. The figurehead of this government is Big Brother, who employs a vast army of informers called the Thought Police who watch and listen to every citizen at all times through a device called a telescreen for the least signs of criminal deviation or unorthodox thoughts. This novel, like Orwells earlier work Animal Farm and Aldous Huxleys Brave New World, is an example of anti-utopian fiction, that kind of fiction which shows man at the mercy of some force over which he has no control. Anti-utopian novels are usua ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, brave new world, human experience
  • 1984: A Bleak Prediction Of The Future - 1,222 words
    1984: A Bleak Prediction Of The Future Nineteen Eighty-Four was written by a major contributor to anticommunist literature around the World War II period, and is one of the greatest stories of an anti-utopian society ever. Nineteen Eighty-Four was not written solely as an entertaining piece of literature or as a dream of what the future could be like, it was written as a warning of what could happen as a result of communism and totalitarianism. This was not necessarily a widely popular vision of the future at the time of publication, but it was certainly considered a possibility by many people. The popular vision of the future, if analyzed as from a character in the book's point of view, som ...
    Related: bleak, prediction, television shows, big brother, orgasm
  • 65279 It Is Unusual When A Masterpiece Develops Out Of An Assignment, But That Is, More Or Less, What - 1,904 words
    It is unusual when a masterpiece develops out of an assignment, but that is, more or less, what happened in the case of Gullivers Travels. The Martinus Scriblerus Club proposed to satirize the follies and vices of learned, scientific and modern men. Each of the members was given a topic, and Swifts was to satirize the numerous and popular volumes describing voyages to faraway lands. Ten years passed between the Scriblerus project and the publication of Gullivers Travels, but when Swift finished, he had completed a definitive work in travel literature. Moreover, he had completed what was to become a childrens classic (in its abridged form) and a satiric masterpiece. Swifts main character, Gul ...
    Related: masterpiece, unusual, make sense, time passes, principal
  • A Postmodern Age - 1,398 words
    ... t is the idea that areas of existence and culture can be separated from, that is abstracted out of, other areas of existence and culture. In addition, we tend to form social groups that are largely based on abstractions (corporations, nations, economic classes, religious preferences, race (which is really an abstract rather than a physical or biological category or relationship), sexual preferences, etc.). As a result, membership in social groups tends to be unstable and transitory as one can easily move between social groups. This, again, creates a high sense of anxiety and tension; this anxiety results, on the one hand, in attempts within these abstract groups to define and redefine th ...
    Related: postmodern, social life, media images, popular culture, ties
  • A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet - 1,201 words
    A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet A Rose, By a Vulcan Name, Would Smell as Sweet. Social commentary is dangerous. In addition to risking social and political censure, the commentator must carefully convey the message. In directly addressing a problem, one risks alienating an audience before making one's point. If one indirectly approaches said problem, one may appear to lack conviction or a point. Star Trek: the Original Series takes a third path, that of allegory. Unfortunately, as the television series belongs to the science fiction genre, its social significance is often disregarded. However, upon examination, it is clear that the veiled nature of commentary in Star Trek is v ...
    Related: smell, sweet, time magazine, social situations, intolerance
  • A Separate Peace: The Dying Legacy - 1,345 words
    A Separate Peace: The Dying Legacy By early 1918 in Russia, the Bolsheviks controlled only the north-western area of the Russian Empire (Petrograd and Moscow) together with the areas between and around them. Various opposition groups were formed against the Bolsheviks, under the new Provisional Government. The provisional government had proposed elections for a new assembly in late 1917; Lenin had seen that the Bolsheviks must act before this democratically elected government convened, but once in power, he allowed the elections to proceed. In the November 1917 polls, Bolshevik candidates won just under 25 per cent of the vote, while the moderate socialists polled over 40 per cent. Lenin sen ...
    Related: legacy, separate peace, soviet socialist, power relations, formally
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