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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: utilitarianism

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  • Flood Plain Ethics: The Conflicts Between Utilitarianism And Aldo Leopold's Land Ethics - 802 words
    Flood Plain Ethics: The Conflicts Between Utilitarianism And Aldo Leopold'S Land Ethics This paper will discuss the conflicts between the utilitarian ethical theory and the ethical theory put forth by Aldo Leopold known as The Land Ethic. The question chosen to express the philosophical differences central in the two theories is, what should we do with flood plain land use? The land use issue in general requires careful consideration. The flood plain land use issue illustrates the utilitarian and Aldo Leopold's Land Ethic philosophical conflicts. Utilitarianism derives from: 1) Actions which result in the greatest good for the greatest number of people. 2) Promote efficiency by comparing act ...
    Related: aldo, aldo leopold, ethics, flood, human ethics, plain, utilitarianism
  • Kant And Utilitarianism - 1,360 words
    Kant And Utilitarianism In the story, The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas, two points of view are introduced. The Kantian point of view is contrasted with the Utilitarian point of view. In the story there is a city named Omelas, in which a single child suffers so that the community may live with great happiness. Most of the community accepts the fact that one child must suffer for happiness to exist. However, the odd citizen becomes so disgusted with the fact the child is allowed to suffer that they leave Omelas for good. In this essay, one character will be a Utilitarian and another character will be Kantian. The two characters will debate the issue of sacrificing one person for the good of ...
    Related: kant, utilitarianism, happy life, planet earth, shouldnt
  • Utilitarianism - 218 words
    Utilitarianism Utilitarianism, for all the unfortunate connotations of the word (which conjures up images of factories, high-rise buildings and all things ugly-but-functional), is an ethical system of great elegance and beauty. It is also a system of great importance: I would guess that the large majority of people in our society are more or less utilitarians, and that they are such without having given the matter a moment's thought. It arouses strong feelings. Most proponents of utilitarianism would probably say that it's not only right, but obviously right; that those who are not utilitarians are living in the Dark Ages. Many of its opponents consider it a thoroughly evil thing, tending to ...
    Related: utilitarianism, christian philosophy, christian ethics, dark ages, glance
  • Utilitarianism - 665 words
    Utilitarianism Utilitarianism is the ethical doctrine which essentially states that which is good is that which brings about the most happiness to the most people. John Stuart Mill believed that the decisions we make should always benefit the most people as much as possible regardless of the consequences to the minority or even yourself. He would say all that matters in the decision of right versus wrong is the amount of happiness produced by the consequences. In the decisions we make Mill would say that we need to weigh the outcomes and make our decision based on that outcome that benefits the majority. For Mill, pleasure is the only desirable consequence of our decisions or actions. The Ju ...
    Related: utilitarianism, the bible, divine creator, judeo christian, augustine
  • Utilitarianism - 1,043 words
    Utilitarianism Utlitarianism What is Utilitarianism? Utilitarianism is a philosophical concept that holds an action to be held right if it tends to promote happiness for the greatest number of people. Utilitarians define the morally right actions as those actions that maximize some non-moral good or happiness and minimize some non-moral evil. Pleasure is an example of a non-moral good and pain is an example of a non- moral evil. A utilitarian will fous on the consequences of an act rather than on the intristic nature of the act or the motives of the agent. In short, utilitarians focus on ends rather than actions. An example would be a person that litters, a utilitarian will argue that the ac ...
    Related: utilitarianism, human beings, walk away, good thing, evaluate
  • Utilitarianism - 1,187 words
    Utilitarianism John Stuart Mill suggests that a persons ethical decision-making process should be based solely upon the amount of happiness that the person can receive. Although Mill fully justifies himself, his approach lacks certain criteria for which happiness can be considered. Happiness should be judged, not only by pleasure, but by pain as well. This paper will examine Mills position on happiness, and the reasoning behind it. Showing where there are agreements and where there are disagreements will critique the theory of Utilitarianism. By showing the problems that the theory have will reveal what should make up ethical decision-making. John Stuart Mill supports and explains his reason ...
    Related: utilitarianism, jesus christ, greatest happiness principle, ethical decision-making, failing
  • Utilitarianism - 1,320 words
    Utilitarianism When faced with a moral dilemma, utilitarianism identifies the appropriate considerations, but offers no realistic way to gather the necessary information to make the required calculations. This lack of information is a problem both in evaluating the welfare issues and inevaluating the consequentialist issues which utilitarianism requires be weighed when making moral decisions. Utilitarianism attempts to solve both of these difficulties by appealing to experience; however, no method of reconciling an individual decision with the rules of experience is suggested, and no relative weights are assigned to the various considerations. In deciding whether or not to torture a terroris ...
    Related: rule utilitarianism, utilitarianism, adolf hitler, decision making, reward
  • Utilitarianism - 463 words
    Utilitarianism Despite making valid claims on justice, John Stuart Mill s attempt to reconcile justice and utility is not successful. Mill explains how justice dictates certain actions and results; however, he does not thoroughly explain how each aspect promotes the most utility for all. In other words, Mill describes how the different interpretations of justice are often interpreted, while explaining that there is too individual interpretation, he demonstrates how justice cannot be reconciled with utility. Mill begins his argument by giving five interpretations of justice. First, is the notion that it is"unjust to deprive a person of their liberty, property, or any other thing which belongs ...
    Related: utilitarianism, stuart mill, john stuart, justice john, lastly
  • Utilitarianism Slavery - 1,063 words
    Utilitarianism - Slavery Kunta Kinte the infamous character from the movie Roots was the model slave that many Americans pictured as your typical slave. Most people pictured the slavery era as a dark age of the United States. They picture this part of the U.S. history as the period of suffering and regrettableness. This era has been described as a period of repression and forced labor, however without this episode there would be no modern day United States. In order to survive in a world of fierce completion one needs to do whatever it takes to succeed. For the United States, it needed the cheap labor to be able to become the world power it is now today. Utilitarianism, whenever this word is ...
    Related: slavery, slavery in america, utilitarianism, mercy killing, right thing
  • Utilitarianism Slavery - 1,049 words
    ... over their slaves, which included, by law, the power of life and death. Slavery was also far more necessary to the economy and social system of Rome, than it had been in Greece. The wealthy Romans, often maintaining large city and country homes, depended on numerous slaves for the continuous and efficient operation of these households. Imperial conquests and expansion eventually exhausted the native Roman workforce, so a great number of foreign slaves had to be imported to work the agricultural labor needs. The primary way of acquiring slaves was through war; tens of thousands of captured prisoners of war were brought to Rome as slaves. Other sources of slaves were debtors, who sold the ...
    Related: slavery, slavery in america, utilitarianism, latin america, african people
  • Utilitarianism Theory - 373 words
    Utilitarianism Theory The Utilitarian Theory is a much more structured theory than Egoism, but which one is better? Is it better to bring the most happiness to the most people, or is it better to maximize the happiness of the single individual? Well, in the perfect world you use both theories in conjunction, but if you must choose one or the other, utilitarianism is definitely the one to be used. This is the case because it is structured to use a subjective review instead of objective in the case of egoism. A point system given to the quality of happiness can be the only true way to judge what is best for everyone. On the other hand, who is given the right to choose how strong the happiness ...
    Related: utilitarianism, the lottery, winning, determining
  • Utilitarianism V Kantianism - 1,287 words
    Utilitarianism V. Kantianism Ethics can be defined as "the conscious reflection on our moral beliefs with the aim of improving, extending or refining those beliefs in some way." (Dodds, Lecture 2) Kantian moral theory and Utilitarianism are two theories that attempt to answer the ethical nature of human beings. This paper will attempt to explain how and why Kantian moral theory and Utilitarianism differ as well as discuss why I believe Kant's theory provides a more plausible account of ethics. Immanuel Kant's deonotological ethical theory assesses if actions are moral based on the person's will or intention of acting. Kant's theory can be categorized as a deonotological because "actions are ...
    Related: utilitarianism, different ways, categorical imperative, right thing, lecture
  • Utilitarianism Vs Cultural Ethical Relativism - 953 words
    Utilitarianism Vs Cultural Ethical Relativism Utilitarianism is an example of Consequentialist Ethics, where the morality of an action is determined by its accomplishing its desired results. In both scenarios the desired result was to save the lives of thousands of people in the community. Therefore, a Utilitarian would say that the actions taken in both of the scenarios are moral. Since an (Act) Utilitarian believes that actions should be judged according to the results it achieves. Happiness should not be simply one's own, but that of the greatest number. In both scenarios, the end result saved the lives of 5,000 members of the community. The end result is the only concern and to what extr ...
    Related: ethical, relativism, utilitarianism, right thing, utilitarian perspective
  • Utilitarianism: The Survival Lottery - 900 words
    Utilitarianism: The Survival Lottery It is better to give than to receive . I believe I was about nine years old when I heard that statement for the first time . It was in church. It was one of those things that I randomly chose to hear while sitting in church every Sunday. Normally anything that was said in that building never made sense to me and I never had any use for retaining it. This time however something did make sense to me. Perhaps it was because my parents had been telling me that same thing except in a more ambiguous and indirect manner. Isaac you should share your toys; Isaac why don't you give your food to your sister if you don't want it?; Isaac get your old toys and clothes ...
    Related: lottery, the lottery, eighth amendment, good intentions, context
  • Abortion In Utilitarian Terms - 1,387 words
    Abortion In Utilitarian Terms Abortion This essay is an analysis of abortion in utilitarian terms. Compared to some writings on abortion, it is very short. And it is short for good reason: utilitarianism really has very little to say on this issue. Intuitionists will predictably take this as proof of the inadequacy of utilitarianism. The utilitarian, however, after noticing the various muddles produced by the intuitionist - the arguments over whether the fetus is a person, whether one person has the right to the use of another's body and/or whether someone has the right to determine what occurs in their own body (and in the case of both, the interminable debates as to what is to be done abou ...
    Related: abortion, utilitarian, animal abuse, high cost, poorer
  • Absolutism And Relativism - 1,251 words
    Absolutism And Relativism Absolutism and relativism are two extreme ethical approaches to reality. While they are both valid and supported by facts, they are very contrasting in their views. Values are what a person cares about and thinks is worthwhile. For example, values can include life, love, religious faith, freedom, relationships, health, justice, education, family and many other things. Usually these values are what provides the passion in a person's life, and gives them hope and a reason for being. A person might go to any lengths to protect what they feel is right and to preserve these values. Values can be divided up into two subcategories: absolute and relative. Absolute values de ...
    Related: absolutism, relativism, john stuart mill, more important, fundamental
  • Aids Test On Animal - 1,191 words
    Aids Test On Animal Aids Testing on Animals Between 25 and 50 million animals are killed in American laboratories each year, this include mice, rats, cats, ferrets, monkey, and etc.(American Anti-Vivisection Society) Since the medical skill has been developed, numbers of drugs have been invented to fight the diseases that human beings get. In order to make sure that those medicine works, the medicines need to be tested on animals first. When a new disease is found, thousands of animals are put in the laboratory to test on the new medicine. And during the past decade, the new disease, Aids, is found. Is it time again for millions of animals to sacrifice their lives and have no right for their ...
    Related: aids, animal experimentation, animal rights, veterinary medicine, university school
  • An Ethical Dilemna - 1,185 words
    An Ethical Dilemna Dilemma- Taken from: Business Ethics - Ethical Decision Making and Cases A Real Life Situation pages 62-63 After three years with the company, Sandy was promoted to assistant plant manager. This was a big step for Unity Welding and Construction, as well as for the industry; Sandy was one of only a handful of women who had broken through the "glass ceiling" and made their way into management. She had proved to the men around her that she deserved the job, and she was now being toasted by assistant managers from other plants across the country John, her boss, had been her advocate with the company. He had personally lobbied upper management in her behalf. Unity Welding and C ...
    Related: ethical, ethical decision, ethical decision-making, environmental protection agency, quality control
  • An Ethical Dilemna - 1,165 words
    ... will have to say that overlooking everything would benefit almost everyone involved. Sandy will have to doctor up the quality-control reports, but this is considered acceptable in the Utilitarianism viewpoint because she will save many peoples jobs. If Sandy does modify the quality-control reports, she will be supporting John who has helped and supported her career when no one else believed in her. This decision would also benefit the good of the company because they would not have to layoff their most productive workers around the Christmas holidays. If they did lay off their most productive workers, the company would be left with the least productive and lazy workers because they have ...
    Related: ethical, ethical behavior, ethical decision, ethical decision-making, ethical standards
  • An Overview Of Immanuel Kant - 1,043 words
    ... tegorical imperative focuses on the principle, rather than the people, involved. Kants theory also avoids utilitarianism, which would permit lying, murder, stealing, and the like, if it produces happiness. His theory is for capital punishment(2). Kant writes: Even if a civil society resolved to dissolve itself with the consent of all its members- as might be supposed in the case of a people inhabiting an island resolving to separate and scatter through the whole world- the last murder lying in prison ought to be executed before the resolution was carried out. This ought to be done in order that every one may realize the desert of his deeds, and that bloodguiltiness may not remain on the ...
    Related: immanuel, immanuel kant, kant, overview, categorical imperative
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