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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: unrest

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  • Born In Florence, Italy In 1469, Niccol Machiavelli Was The First Great Political Philosopher Of The Renaissance Once A Burea - 954 words
    Born in Florence, Italy in 1469, Niccol Machiavelli was the first great political philosopher of the Renaissance. Once a bureaucrat and diplomat for the state of Florence, he was removed from office when the Medici family was restored to power in 1512. He retired to his country home where he, among other works, penned The Prince, a work which has become a political handbook for modern day politicians as well as for those who desire power--whether it be on Wall Street, through corporate conglomerates, or in their personal relationships. The Prince is a philosophical political view on how one might gain, maintain, and expand the power over the state or states in which a ruler has authority. Wh ...
    Related: first great, florence italy, italy, machiavelli, niccolo machiavelli, philosopher, renaissance
  • Brave New World - 1,458 words
    Brave New World Book Report of 'Brave New World' By Michael Tillman Theme: The theme of Brave New World is freedom and how people want it. The people want poetry, danger, good and bad things. This novel shows that when you must give up religion, high art, true science, family, love and other foundations of modern life in place of a sort of unending happiness, it is not worth the sacrifice. These are all also distinguishing marks between humans and animals that were abolished here. In exchange, they received stability with no wars, social unrest, no poverty or disease or any other infirmities or discomforts. However, they only live with an artificial happiness, which they have been brainwashe ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, world book, mustapha mond, central london
  • Brave New World - 617 words
    Brave New World Soma and orgy-porgies, sex hormone chewing gum and erotic play among children-all of these things further the power of the centralized world government in Brave New World. In a civilization that is without disease, old age, and all negative emotions, the people are forced to pay a price without even realizing it. That great price is their freedom. With mass consumption as a diversion, the New World quickly forgets the advantages of true independence. In the futurized novel by Alduos Huxley, conformity rules over individuality and scientific control successfully enslaves a brainwashed and fearful society. Bokanovsky's process is one of the major instruments of social stability ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, world government, world leaders, major problem
  • Brave New World Eugenics - 903 words
    Brave New World - Eugenics In chapter II of a Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley, Huxley makes some very bold statements on the current state of our nations increasing technology towards medicine. This leads to the formation of the idea that we need to institute a eugenics program. Though there are many drawbacks in using eugenics, the ultimate goal is very beneficial. Huxley gives a very clear example on why we need a system like eugenics when he states an example which involves introducing a cure for malaria to a tropical island. Suppose someone was to go to a tropical island with DDT and wipe out malaria. After two or three years, hundreds of thousands of lives are saved. Though t ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, eugenics, world war ii, ultimate goal
  • British In 19th - 1,840 words
    British In 19th The nineteenth (19th) century was a period of great change and accompanying social unrest in the British Isles. Most outstanding among the changes was the industrial revolution. As everything in life, it brought good, but it also brought evil. The industrial revolution combined with the expansion of the British Empire made the United Kingdom, the richest and most powerful country in the world. Some of the islanders became unbelievably wealthy, but others, unfortunately, became unbelievably poor. Writers from this historical period cognizant of the human suffering, became social critics of what was taking place in England, of how the rich and powerful became more oppressive th ...
    Related: british, british empire, british isles, british society, united kingdom
  • Buffalo Bill And Deadwood Dick - 1,818 words
    Buffalo Bill And Deadwood Dick Phillips Eng. 124 Writing Assn. #1 I Cant Hear a Damn Word Youre Saying Those who deprecate the free supply of such ficticious works as the public demands, are generally in favor of the entire exclusion of fiction of a sensational cast, a course which will unavoidably result in alienating from the library the very class most needing its beneficial influence (Denning, 49). It is obvious here that William Fletcher attached more significance and importance to dime novels than most serious intellectuals did in the late 1800s. In fact, most people, particularly in the middle class, thought dime novels were vulgar and that they caused young children to imitate the ac ...
    Related: buffalo, buffalo bill, dick, daily life, real world
  • Caliban Inside And Out - 1,789 words
    Caliban Inside and Out Question: Compare or contrast the ways in which roberto Fernandez Retamar and George Lamming construct national identity through the figure of Caliban. Use Shakespeare's The Tempest if you need to to discuss Caliban. In order to discuss the ways in which Retamar and Lamming have constructed a national identity through Caliban it is essential to discuss the cultural background of these writers. Retamar and Lamming are about as dissimilar as night and day, and this is evident in both the lives that they have led, as well as the essays that they have constructed. Their differences have come from their experiences, and how they have attempted to establish an identity for t ...
    Related: caliban, face value, latin american, cultural background, islands
  • Catherine The Great - 1,069 words
    Catherine The Great CATHERINE THE GREAT EMPRESS OF ALL RUSSIA Catherine II (a.k.a. Catherine the Great) Catherine II, or Catherine the Great, empress of all Russia, did much to continue the process of Westernization reforms began by Peter the Great. Catherine was devoted to art, literature, science, and politics. Many people say she had a great gift and was a great leader, thus she was awarded with the name "the Great" She helped develop schools, hospitals, and many other organizations for the country. She was a shrewd leader and autocrat and helped to continue and further reforms made by Peter the Great, finally making Russia a permanent European power. Originally named Sophie Frederick Aug ...
    Related: catherine, catherine the great, peter the great, orthodox church, western europe
  • Characterization In The Scarlet Letter - 1,048 words
    Characterization in The Scarlet Letter Characterization in The Scarlet Letter Nathaniel Hawthorne was born in Salem, Massachusetts in 1804. After his graduation from Bowdoin College in Maine, he quickly became a well-known author of literary tales concerning early American life. Between 1825 and 1850, he developed his talent by writing short fiction, and he gained international fame for his fictional novel The Scarlet Letter in 1850 (Clendenning 118). Rufus Wilmot Griswold stated, The frivolous costume and brisk action of the story of fashionable life are easily depicted by the practised sketcher, but a work like "The Scarlet Letter" comes slowly upon the canvas, where passions are commingle ...
    Related: characterization, scarlet, scarlet letter, the scarlet letter, world book
  • China Us Relations - 1,423 words
    China US Relations China, for most of its 3500 years of history, China led the world in agriculture, crafts, and science. It fell behind in the 19th century when the Industrial Revolution gave the West clear superiority in military and economic affairs. In the first half of the 20th century, China continued to suffer from major famines, civil unrest, military defeat, and foreign occupation. After World War II, the Communists under Mao Tse Tung established a dictatorship that, while ensuring autonomy of China, imposed strict controls over all aspects of like and cost the lives of tens of millions of people. After 1978, his successor Deng Xiaoping decentralized economic decision making; output ...
    Related: century china, china, trade relations, world trade, law enforcement
  • Chinese Democracy Movements - 2,363 words
    Chinese Democracy Movements In 1978, stimulated by the opening of China to the West and also by the "reversal of verdicts" against the 1976 Tiananmen protesters (These demonstrations against the gang of four had been condemned as counter-revolutionary at the time but were now declared a revolutionary act), thousands of Chinese began to put their thoughts into words, their words onto paper and their paper onto walls to be read by passers by. The most famous focus of these displays became a stretch of blank wall just to the west of the former forbidden city in Beijing, part of which was now a museum and park and part the cluster of residences for China's most senior National leaders. Because o ...
    Related: chinese, chinese people, chinese revolution, democracy, science and technology
  • Christian Muslim Conflict - 1,634 words
    Christian Muslim Conflict The conflict between the Christians and the Muslims, between 1098 and 1229, was the result of political unrest; which was fueled the Muslims migrating into the Christian holy lands, lead by Pope Urban II and carried on, throughout latter centuries by his followers. What follows is a story of war, holy visions,unholy alliances, promises made with fingers crossed, sieges and slaughters, the details of which fill volumes. Christianity, in its infancy, was a very threatened state. It was enriched with radical ideas that called for the worship of a single god in place of the many dieties that had ruled for centuries before. These radical concepts took a while to sink in ...
    Related: christian, muslim, civil war, legal status, luxury
  • Citibank Review - 1,019 words
    ... lion to $15 million for each additional 250,000 credit card customers) =Joining fee and annual fee estimated from American Express Green (Exhibit 9) Philippines I believe this country has room for expansion in the credit card market. There are some negative detractors to entry. A large portion of the population is in the last three categories of earnings (82% of the population earns less than $12,500 annually). The estimated growth rate is a dismal 0.5% annually. In addition, it possesses the lowest political and economic ranking D, with comments about turmoil and communist insurgency. Impressively, the upper category of annual income possesses 50% of the credit cards currently in circul ...
    Related: citibank, credit card, market penetration, direct marketing, communist
  • Clovis Sangrail Of Saki - 711 words
    Clovis Sangrail Of Saki Clovis Sangrail is a character featured in three of the Saki short stories covered this semester. The three featured short stories are "Tobermory", "The Unrest-cure", and "The She-Wolf". Clovis is undoubtedly one of Sakis preferred individuals because he is a reoccurring character. Since Sakis main intention was to mock the aristocracy, he required an antithetical character that could serve as a vehicle for Sakis own actions to be carried out in the stories. A subtle annoyance and dislike for high-society can be sensed in "The Unrest-cure". Clovis hears Huddle whining about the lack of stress in his accommodating aristocratic life. Clovis dutifully tricks the unsuspec ...
    Related: clovis, saki, upper class, mock, leonard
  • Communism In The World - 3,056 words
    ... ginning a nationwide offensive against the peasantry. Unknown millions died as a result. However, his industrial campains of the late 1930s enabled the Soviet Union to rise to the foremost rank of industrial powers. It was also during this time that Stalin enacted the Great Terror which killed millions. Millions more were sent to concentration camps. The fear of Stalin was carried out by his secret police called Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti or KGB.Then an event happened that forever change the world's view of the Soviet Union. That event would be known as World War II. Stalin personnally led the assault on Germany that eventually resulted in the end of the war. The choice now was ...
    Related: after world, communism, third world, third world countries, world countries, world war ii, world wide
  • Comparing The Daily Lives Of African American Women In The 1940s And Today - 1,840 words
    ... acy arises in a racially conscious society where Black women and Black men are still struggling with how to present their physical image and still be accepted in the society. It is very complex trying to negotiate your self-acceptance through two opposing cultures. Advertising in the 1930s had an impact on how African Americans defined themselves, particularly African American women. It is still the same more than 60 years later (Brown & Lieberson, 2000). Advertisers have successfully exploited the self-image of Black men and women. To be Black, especially if you were particularly dark, was loaded with negative stereotypes. Several products, promising miraculous transformations, were man ...
    Related: african, african american, afro american, american, american history, american journal, american life
  • Computer Crime Has Become A Very Large Issue In Our Society Today This Paper Will Look At This Issue From A Sociological Pers - 1,444 words
    Computer Crime has become a very large issue in our society today; this paper will look at this issue from a sociological perspective. It will analyze the various crimes that make up computer crime and see what changes it has brought about in the world in which we live in. Computer crime first is a very new problem in our society today and it is crimes that are committed from a computer. These include embezzling, breaking into other computers, cyber porn and various other crimes that have a drastic affect on the society and the institutions that each of us hold to keep our global society running. To first understand computer crime one must understand first what crime is. According to Diana K ...
    Related: computer crime, computer ethics, computer hacking, computer programming, computer security, computer systems, computer technology
  • Crime And Egypt - 1,072 words
    Crime And Egypt BE CAREFUL OUT THERE Tourists face a world of dangers. But with the right advice, most hazards turn out to be manageable. JIM VAN HOUTEN, A FINANCIAL planner from Phoenix, Ariz., was on a tour of the Middle East, but by the time his group arrived in Egypt, most of its members had opted out. ``We started in Israel with 320 people,'' he said during a visit to the Valley of the Kings, the stunning burial site outside Luxor. ``Only 62 people came to Cairo, and only 16 of us came down to Luxor. But touring Egypt is like the stock market,'' he added. ``When everybody bails out, you should come in.'' A great many U.S. tourists have bailed out on Egypt since 1997, when terrorists sla ...
    Related: crime, egypt, make money, iran iraq, tire
  • Crimes Of Cia And Opec In 1975 - 1,515 words
    Crimes Of Cia And Opec In 1975 The Crimes Of The CIA OPEC Stalling On New Price Oil 1. Intro A. Why the events were important B. The basic problems that came with these events C. Why they could have happened 2. Paragraph 1 A. Rockefeller Papers B. How it influenced the people about the accusations 3. Paragraph 2 A. CIA incidents B. What they were accused of C. The accusations 4. Paragraph 3 A. OPEC B. Describe the events that lead up to this C. Why OPEC decided to do this D. US response to the oil prices 5. Paragraph 4 A. How these tie together or how they don't B. Influences on society C. Over all reactions 6. Conclusion A. Bring together all thoughts B. How some of this could have been sol ...
    Related: opec, government officials, south east, washington post, till
  • Cuban History - 1,431 words
    Cuban History History of Cuba Christopher Columbus landed on the island of Cuba on October 28, 1492, during his initial westward voyage. In honor of the daughter of Ferdinand V and Isabella I of Spain, his benefactors, Columbus named it Juana, the first of several names he successively applied to the island. It eventually became known as Cuba, from its aboriginal name, Cubanascnan. Colonization by Spain When Columbus first landed on Cuba it was inhabited by the Ciboney, a friendly tribe related to the Arawak. Colonization of the island began in 1511, when the Spanish soldier Diego Velzquez established the town of Baracoa. Velzquez subsequently founded several other settlements, including San ...
    Related: cuban, cuban government, cuban revolution, history, liberal party
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