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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: united states senate

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  • Abortion Prolife View - 1,104 words
    ... oved by God who has a distinct plan for their lives. It denies the child the right to live and society the privilege of the childs gift and contributions to the world. "God hears the new life in the womb, the heart within the heart, the anguish cry of hostage child sobbing in the dark." Many times after having an abortion, a woman will become emotionally unstable. Post-abortion syndrome describes the trauma of the woman who finally feels guilty, understands the repercussions of her actions, and regrets her previous decision. Statistics show that 92% feel less in touch with their emotions or feel a need to suppress their emotions. 82% had greater feelings of loneliness or isolation and 86 ...
    Related: abortion, human nature, moral responsibility, senate judiciary committee, rage
  • Abortion Prolife View - 1,093 words
    ... the right to live and society the privilege of the childs gift and contributions to the world. God hears the new life in the womb, the heart within the heart, the anguish cry of hostage child sobbing in the dark. Many times after having an abortion, a woman will become emotionally unstable. Post-abortion syndrome describes the trauma of the woman who finally feels guilty, understands the repercussions of her actions, and regrets her previous decision. Statistics show that 92% feel less in touch with their emotions or feel a need to suppress their emotions. 82% had greater feelings of loneliness or isolation and 86% had increased tendency toward anger or rage. 53% increased or began use ...
    Related: abortion, online available, united states senate, pro-life movement, minute
  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,920 words
    Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809 in Kentucky. When he was two, the Lincolns moved a few miles to another farm on the old Cumberland Trail. A year later, his mother gave birth to another boy, Thomas, but he died a few days later. When Lincoln was seven his family moved to Indiana. In 1818, Lincolns mother died from a deadly disease called the "milk-sick." Then ten years later his sister died and left him with only his father and stepmother. Lincoln traveled to New Salem in April 1831 and settled there the following July. In the fall of 1836 he and Mrs. Bennett Abell had a deal that if she brought her single sister to New Salem he had to promise to marry her. When ...
    Related: abraham, abraham lincoln, lincoln, john wilkes booth, president johnson
  • Captial Punisment - 1,458 words
    ... he exact same category of offense - in other words, cost comparisons are valid only if you compare the cost of death penalty cases to the equivalent life without parole cases. But the cost for justice does not have to be so high for the execution of murderers. If we only allowed appeals that are relevant in proving ones innocence and eliminated the many more that are used merely as delaying tactics, it would save millions in taxpayers dollars. Abolitionists claim that the death penalty is unconstitutional by quoting the eighth amendment which forbids cruel and unusual punishment. But cruel and unusual was never defined by our founding fathers. So where does the Supreme Court stand on the ...
    Related: social policy, human life, united states senate, penal, joann
  • Close Reading Analysis Of Last Of His Kind - 604 words
    Close Reading Analysis of Last Of His Kind The 33rd President of the United States of America, Harry S. Truman, had over ten biographies published about him, each one being different from one another. This book is especially unique due to its style, easy reading, and simple sentence structure. The tone of the book Last of His Kind, by Charles Robbins, is best described as informative and effusive, in other words the book is very outgoing by often giving "fun facts" and a great deal of insight. There is also some juggling of conversation between Harry, his friends, and the author. This "juggling" helps to give the book its own distinct style and also keeps the reader focused. The authors view ...
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  • Election Of 2000 - 1,187 words
    Election Of 2000 Who I favor for president in 2000 Each of the candidates for President and Vice-President has specific experience and numerous accomplishments that aid in decision-making for voters. Al Gore graduated with honors from Harvard University in 1969. Later in that year, he voluntarily enlisted in the United States Army to go to Vietnam as a military journalist. In May of 1971, he returned from Vietnam. After that, he attended the Vanderbilt Univ.Grad School of Religion from 1971 until 1972. Later, he attended Vanderbilt University Law School from 1975 to 1976. In November of 1976, he was elected to congress representing Tennessee's Fourth Congressional District. In February of 19 ...
    Related: election, working families, columbine high school, persian gulf, credibility
  • Federal Reserve System - 1,361 words
    ... banking system. A major component of the System is the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC), which is made up of the Board of Governors, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and presidents of four other Federal Reserve Banks, who serve on a rotating basis, The FOMC oversees open market operations, which is the main tool used by the Federal Reserve to influence money market conditions and the growth of money and credit. Two other groups play roles in the way the Federal Reserve System works; depository institutions, through which the tools of monetary policy operate, and advisory committees, which make recommendations to the Board of Governors and to the Reserve Bans re ...
    Related: banking system, federal deposit insurance, federal deposit insurance corporation, federal funds, federal government, federal open market, federal open market committee
  • Foreign Policy - 1,082 words
    Foreign Policy With the world balancing on the edge of destruction, foreign relationships are extremely important to the United States of America. The United States is fully recognized as the most powerful nation on the planet earth, and with that power comes a definitive sense of responsibility. The U.S. needs to pay close attention to this responsibility if it hopes to keep its place on the throne as king of the nations. This is where the United States foreign policy comes into play. Foreign policy is essentially positive or negative interaction with other nations as well as the goals and principles that are included (Morrison #1 607). The United States have a couple of choices concerning ...
    Related: foreign aid, foreign policy, states foreign, united states foreign, united states foreign policy
  • George Bush - 1,512 words
    George Bush George W. Bush Politics have been the family business for more than one family in the United States. The familiar family of several generations is the Kennedy family who remains in the political spotlight for fifty-three years and running. As Elizabeth Dole attempts to gain the Republican nomination for the 2000 presidential race she hopes to continue the forty-nine year Dole family streak. Coming close to twenty-five years in politics Bill Clinton prepares to turn the scepter over to Hillary Clinton as she prepares for a possible seat in the United States Senate. Perhaps the most interesting dynasties are those carried on by father-son teams. Both John Adams and John Quincy Adam ...
    Related: bush, george bush, george w. bush, president george, president george bush
  • Health Care Reform - 1,424 words
    Health Care Reform 9:15 Due to the upcoming presidential election, the two major political parties, and their candidates, have been focusing on the primary problems that the nation will face. Chief among those problems is the future of Medicare, the national health-insurance plan. Medicare was enacted in 1965, under the administration of Lyndon B. Johnson, in order to provide health insurance for retired citizens and the disabled (Ryan). The Medicare program covers most people aged 65 or older, as well as handicapped people who enroll in the program, and consists of two health plans: a hospital insurance plan (part A) and a medical insurance plan (part B) (Marmor 22). Before Medicare, many A ...
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  • How The Government May Have Created Aids - 4,554 words
    How the Government May Have Created AIDS The following is a complete verbatim transcription from a recent broadcast of "Network 23", a program shown on a local Los Angeles Public Access Cable Channel. FULL TRANSCRIPTION FROM NETWORK 23: Good evening, I'm Michel Kassett. This is Network 23. A couple of weeks ago we had a program on the subject of AIDS, addressing the question of whether AIDS -- the AIDS virus -- was created by the government; and I'm sure that some people were quite shocked by what they heard. We spent that entire program relating to you the evidence of a very substantial amount of factual evidence which supports the proposition that AIDS is a synthetic biological agent that ...
    Related: aids, aids research, american government, states government, united states government
  • Jfk Life - 2,105 words
    Jfk Life In November 1960, at the age of 43, John F. Kennedy became the youngest man ever elected president of the United States. Theodore Roosevelt had become president at 42 when President William McKinley was assassinated, but he was not elected at that age. On Nov. 22, 1963, Kennedy was shot to death in Dallas, Tex., the fourth United States president to die by an assassin's bullet. Kennedy was the nation's first Roman Catholic president. He was inaugurated in January 1961, succeeding Republican President Dwight D. Eisenhower. He defeated the Republican candidate, Vice-President Richard M. Nixon, by little more than 100,000 votes. It was one of the closest elections in the nation's histo ...
    Related: cold war, states senate, president william, vietnam, commission
  • Jimmy Carter - 1,489 words
    Jimmy Carter The President of Peace Jimmy Carter was born October 1, 1924, in the small farming town of Plains, Georgia, and grew up in the nearby community of Archery. His father, James Earl Carter, Sr., was a farmer and businessman; his mother, Lillian Gordy, a registered nurse. He was educated in the Plains public schools, attended Georgia Southwestern College and the Georgia Institute of Technology, and received a Bachelor of Science degree from the United States Naval Academy in 1946. On July 7, 1946, he married Rosalynn Smith. When his father died in 1953, he resigned a naval commission and returned to Plains. He became involved in the affairs of the community, serving as chairman of t ...
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  • John Quincy Adams - 1,417 words
    John Quincy Adams JOHN QUINCY ADAMS John Quincy Adams was born in Braintree (Quincy), Massachusetts on July 11th, 1767. His ancestry lineage was English. Adams religion was Unitarian. His father, John Adams, was born in Braintree (Quincy), Massachusetts on October 19th, 1735. He died in Quincy, Massachusetts on July 4th, 1826. He had three major occupations. He was a lawyer, a statesman, and the President of the United States. His mother, Abigail Smith Adams, was born in Weymouth Massachusetts on November 11th, 1744. She died in Quincy, Massachusetts on October 28th, 1818. John Quincy Adams had two brothers: Charles Adams who lived between the years 1770 and 1800, and Thomas Boylston Adams w ...
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  • Legalization Of Marijuana - 2,593 words
    ... il. Several pressing issues have arose throughout time, such as abortion and capitol punishment. The controversies have been addressed and decisions have been made. A new topic has emerged l states (1986, Congress), (Buchsbaum, 8). This crowds court rooms and jail cells, often times forcing judges to release violent offenders. In 1994 alone, 1.35 million people were incarcerated because of possession and use of marijuana (Buckley, 70). Even though only an estimates ten million Americans use marijuana on a monthly basis, about seventy million have at some time tried it. The current laws would justify putting all seventy million citizens in jail (Buckley, 70). Several pressing issues have ...
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  • Louisiana Purchase - 2,518 words
    Louisiana Purchase Several great American Statesmen were pivotal in shaping and molding the government of the United States. History has since forgotten some of these founding fathers. The ones remembered throughout history are those we hold up for their accomplishments. Thomas Jefferson is one of the American Statesmen that stands out from the rest as being one of the greatest contributors to our present form of government. Historian Robert Tucker described Jefferson's life as being a paradox. He was a slave holder that was not necessarily in favor of this form of servitude. He also associated himself with the yeoman farmer, yet he traveled in company with a cosmopolitan flair. So it is to ...
    Related: louisiana, louisiana purchase, louisiana territory, purchase, declaration of independence
  • Millard Fillmore - 1,222 words
    Millard Fillmore Millard Fillmore Fillmore, Millard (1800-1874), 13th president of the United States (1850-1853) and the second vice president to finish the term of a deceased president. He succeeded Zachary Taylor at a critical moment in United States history. The Mexican War (1846-1848) had renewed the conflict between the Northern and Southern states over slavery, since it had added new territories to the United States. The debate over whether these territories should be admitted as free or slave states precipitated a crisis that threatened civil war. Much to the relief of Northern and Southern politicians, Fillmore pursued a moderate and conciliatory policy. He signed into law the Compro ...
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  • Molly Brown - 1,311 words
    Molly Brown The woman who would come to be known as the "Unsinkable Molly Brown" was born on Denkler Alley and Butler Street in Hannibal, Missouri on July 18, 1867. She was born during a very bad thunderstorm and her mother predicted right then that Molly would not be "just another pretty face." Margaret (Molly's birth name) grew up in a small town with a surprisingly small population of less than 20,000 people. (Heroine of the Titanic, 1) Margaret attended school for thirteen years. It was during these years that she earned her nicknames Maggie and Molly. She had a very open and close family. There were eight people in her small childhood home. These eight consisted of her two parents, her ...
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  • On March 10, 1821, President James Monroe Appointed General Andrew Jackson To Take Possession Of Florida And Gave Him The Ful - 1,146 words
    On March 10, 1821, President James Monroe appointed General Andrew Jackson to take possession of Florida and gave him the full powers of governor. Jackson accepted the office only on the condition that he could resign as soon as the territorial government was organized.(1) On July 17, 1821, Spain transferred Florida to the United States, and Jackson sent his resignation to the president in November. In all, Andrew Jackson visited Florida only three times: in 1814 during the War of 1812, in 1818 during the First Seminole War, and in 1821 to organize the first territorial government.(2) The change from Spanish to American rule was not a smooth transition. The Spanish population quickly realize ...
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  • Origins And History Of The Electoral College - 3,581 words
    ... design and experience. As it now operates: Each State is allocated a number of Electors equal to the number of its U.S. Senators (always 2) plus the number of its U.S. Representatives (which may change each decade according to the size of each States population as determined in the Census). The political parties (or independent candidates) in each State submit to the States chief election official a list of individuals pledged to their candidate for president and equal in number to the States electoral vote. Usually, the major political parties select these individuals either in their State party conventions or through appointment by their State party leaders while third parties and inde ...
    Related: american history, college system, electoral, electoral college, history
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