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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: united states foreign

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  • Andrew Carnegie - 1,141 words
    Andrew Carnegie Andrew Carnegie Essay written by A man of Scotland, a distinguished citizen of the United States, and a philanthropist devoted to the betterment of the world around him, Andrew Carnegie became famous at the turn of the twentieth century and became a real life rags to riches story. Born in Dunfermline, Scotland, on November 25, 1835, Andrew Carnegie entered the world in poverty. The son of a hand weaver, Carnegie received his only formal education during the short time between his birth and his move to the United States. When steam machinery for weaving came into use, Carnegies father sold his looms and household goods, sailing to America with his wife and two sons. At this t ...
    Related: andrew, andrew carnegie, carnegie, carnegie hall, carnegie steel
  • Foreign Policy - 1,122 words
    Foreign Policy The United States outlook on foreign policy affairs after World War II was influenced by the fear of communist expansionism rather than establishing foreign relations with each country. The U.S. found itself with a conflict between its profound belief in the constitution and democracy and a need for domestic and national security. In 1947, the National Security Act authorized the creation of the Central Intelligence Agency. Its role was to protect domestic security and oversee national relations. Following World War II the Cold War intensified and the anti communist sentiment consumed our country. The actions of the CIA conflicted with that of the constitution and the morality ...
    Related: american foreign, american foreign policy, foreign policy, foreign relations, states foreign, states policy, united states foreign
  • Foreign Policy - 1,082 words
    Foreign Policy With the world balancing on the edge of destruction, foreign relationships are extremely important to the United States of America. The United States is fully recognized as the most powerful nation on the planet earth, and with that power comes a definitive sense of responsibility. The U.S. needs to pay close attention to this responsibility if it hopes to keep its place on the throne as king of the nations. This is where the United States foreign policy comes into play. Foreign policy is essentially positive or negative interaction with other nations as well as the goals and principles that are included (Morrison #1 607). The United States have a couple of choices concerning ...
    Related: foreign aid, foreign policy, states foreign, united states foreign, united states foreign policy
  • Foreign Policy - 1,149 words
    ... taken over by the northern Communist government (613). Americans now began a series of skepticism regarding foreign relations that ended up in war. Some Americans were not very happy about the United States getting involved with other nations civil wars, but there were some that feel as I do; that we were helping to put and end to Communist control in the world. Although we were unsuccessful in the particular instance of Vietnam, I think that the United States should take on the role as world protector. I believe that the United States should definitely play the part of world protector whenever and wherever possible. In the beginning, I was essentially for the United States being Isolati ...
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  • Foreign Trade In 90s - 1,055 words
    Foreign Trade In 90s The advances of the technological revolution have molded the evolution of the United States foreign trade in the 1990s and into the new millennium. Globalization has become the credo for the Clinton administration, and the booming American economy has done nothing but strongly bolster this approach. Globalizations foothold in American policy really began in the much-debated North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which was finally passed in 1994. NAFTA specifically said one of its goals was to "contribute to the harmonious development and expansion of world trade and provide a catalyst to broader international cooperation". However at the time that was hardly the ca ...
    Related: foreign trade, free trade, north american free trade agreement, states foreign, trade agreement, trade organization, trade relations
  • Foriegn Policy And Cuba - 696 words
    Foriegn Policy And Cuba United States Foreign Policy with Cuba As president of the United States of America, Mr. William J. Clinton has five duties to perform. The Constitution states that he must act as Commander in Chief, Chief Executive, Chief of State, Chief Legislator, and Chief Diplomat. (Constitution) When he deals with foreign policies, he is executing his job as Chief Diplomat. This very important task consists of recognizing foreign governments, making treaties, and making executive agreements. When making the treaties, two-thirds of the senators there must agree with the policy. Congress can also play a part in foreign policies. The framers did not clearly define weather the presi ...
    Related: cuba, foreign policy, foriegn, united states foreign policy, power over
  • Lodge And Wilson - 1,033 words
    Lodge and Wilson Political rivalries define American government. The dual-party system by nature sets up partisan rivalries between members of all three branches of our government rivalries that have at times pushed our government to progress and at other times slowed it to a grinding halt. The contrasting backgrounds and resulting political ideologies of Woodrow Wilson and Henry Cabot Lodge created a modern rivalry that defined American foreign policy in the twentieth century. Woodrow Wilsons religious background and academic pursuits shaped his personality into one characterized by impatience. Born in Virginia in 1856, Wilson grew up around strict Calvinist doctrine in the Presbyterian ch ...
    Related: henry cabot lodge, lodge, wilson, woodrow wilson, political scientist
  • Martin Luther King - 424 words
    Martin Luther King The person whom I respect who fought for what he believed is a person whom we celebrate every year, on the third Monday in January. He was an American Clergyman and Nobel Prize Winner, one of the principal leaders of the American Civil Rights Movement and a prominent advocate of non-violent protest. That is right, it is Martin Luther King Jr. The reason I admire this man so much is for everything he has done for this country, in the way of racism. It amazes me to see how one person challenged the segregation and racial discriminations in the 1950' and 60's and helped convince White Americans to support the cause of the Civil Rights in the United States. For one man to beco ...
    Related: luther, luther king, martin, martin luther, martin luther king jr
  • Modernization - 1,602 words
    Modernization Modernization can be interpreted as growth of a nation in all areas (i.e. social, economic, political), for example, the aim is development of national forms of polity, the objects of which are to increase the social product with fair shares for all. Successful models now include Japan and the Soviet Union (Apter 1965, Preface). Although this definition is outdated, as the inclusion of the Soviet Union (no longer in existence and with serious economic and social problems persisting in Russia) and Japan (also currently in a recession along with most of Asia) illustrates, the ideal of modernization is clear. Another approach to the term modernization is not to take it as an ideal ...
    Related: modernization, east asia, industrialized nations, oxford university, asia
  • North Korea - 3,011 words
    North Korea The United States has been presented a dilemma towards its foreign policy with the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (North Korea). North Koreas alleged launch of a new Taepo-Dong I missile on August 31, 1998 has heightened American worries and escalated an already tense situation with North Korea. The United States response towards this new missile, which could possibly be able to reach the edges of both Alaska and Hawaii , will be a factor in its decision on whether or not to continue to finance support towards North Korea. New sanctions could mean the collapse of a weak North Korean economy. Already on the brink of economic and political collapse, the loss of U.S. and KEDO ...
    Related: korea, north korea, north korean, south korea, historical context
  • North Korea - 3,025 words
    ... utting off all aid to N. Korea and letting them "sweat it out". U.S. public support would be instrumental in this. 2.) The United States should utilize constructive engagement to gain more influence. Tools for this would be KEDO and humanitarian aid that could be directly sent and distributed by the United States. 3.) Do nothing. By doing nothing we can let the North Korean government destroy itself. Our involvement may be what is keeping the government in power. 4.) Military invasion of North Korea. Take control of their economy and let Korea unite into one nation. These options are all viable, but perhaps not realistic solutions to the North Korean problem. For instance, a military inv ...
    Related: korea, north korea, north korean, south korea, manifest destiny
  • Sixteen Most Significant Events In Us History Between 1789 To 1975 - 4,278 words
    Sixteen Most Significant Events in US History between 1789 to 1975 After a review of United States' history from 1789 to 1975, I have identified what I believe are the sixteen most significant events of that time period. The attached sheet identifies the events and places them in brackets by time period. The following discussion provides my reasoning for selecting each of the events and my opinion as to their relative importance in contrast to each other. Finally, I have concluded that of the sixteen events, the Civil War had the most significant impact on the history of the time period in which it occurred and remains the most significant event in American history. The discussion begins wit ...
    Related: american history, history, significant events, significant impact, sixteen, states history, united states history
  • Truman Doctrine Results - 1,151 words
    Truman Doctrine - Results The Truman Doctrine was the impetus for the change in United States foreign policy, from isolationist to internationalists; thus we were drawn into two wars of containment and into world affairs. The Truman Doctrine led to a major change in U.S. foreign policy from its inception - aid to Turkey and Greece - to its indirect influence in Korea and Vietnam. The aftermath of World War II inspired the U.S. to issue a proclamation that would stem Communist influence throughout the world. However, our zeal in that achievement sent our soldiers to die in Vietnam and Korea for a seemingly futile cause. It must be the policy of the U.S. to support free peoples. This is no mor ...
    Related: doctrine, truman, truman doctrine, marshall plan, republican congress
  • Us Foreign Policy Towards Nato - 2,236 words
    ... State Dean Acheson was on Joseph Stalins payroll.13 So you can see that during this time period there was much turmoil between the parties and nothing much could get done in reference to NATO. The height of this period was the debate over the Bricker amendment, which was an amendment to the constitution in which Congress would gain the responsibility and authority to approve all international agreements that failed to pass by one vote. Had this amendment passed the United States might have dropped out of NATO shortly afterwards. When this amendment failed this period ended. This is the period when we really see America have an contributory policy towards NATO. Anything NATO needed that ...
    Related: american policy, foreign policy, nato, states foreign, states policy, united states foreign, united states foreign policy
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