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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: united states department

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  • Agent Orange - 973 words
    Agent Orange In 1962, the United States Military began to use a potentially toxic chemical known as Agent Orange. The toxic chemical was used a defoliant to destroy crops and eliminate ground cover during the Vietnam War. Vietnamese troops would hide underneath the thick forest and make it impossible for United States troops to spot them. So in 1962 the Army began using Agent Orange as a way of eliminating that problem. The government had very little knowledge about the deadly chemical but went ahead and used it anyway. They had no idea of the disastrous long-term effects that it would have on men, women and children. But the hardest group hit by the chemical was not Vietnamese civilians but ...
    Related: agent, agent orange, orange, term effects, vietnam veterans
  • Air Force History - 920 words
    Air Force History 1- The position of Chief Master Sergeants of the Air Force occupies the top enlisted grade, and has great responsibility and prestige in the Air Force. The objective of this background paper is to inform on the career progression, awards, and decorations of the former Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Thomas N. Barnes. In the first main point, I will trace the former CMSAF military career from Non-Commissioned Officer to Senior Non-Commissioned Officer Tier. Secondly, I will discuss the major awards and decorations of former CMSAF Thomas N. Barnes. CMSAF Thomas N. Barnes has been a significant figure in the development of Air Force History. 2- In April 1949 Chief Barne ...
    Related: force base, history, internet history, government printing, armed forces
  • Animal Research - 346 words
    Animal Research Experimenting with animals in the scientific field is causing a problem throughout America. Many Americans do not approve of the abuse and torture of the animals by scientists and other organizations. People do not want the victims of torture (animals) to suffer the side effects of medical testing or die. Things such as visual problems, abnormal sexual behaviors, hearing loses, or and deformities, are viewed as irreplaceable. Testing should be allowed to be done on a small percentage of animals and the human being tat want to take their places. True enough there has been over 10 million dogs a year destroyed by different groups, such as public pounds, animal shelters, and hum ...
    Related: animal research, animal rights, animal testing, animal welfare, united states department
  • Animal Rights Vs Human Rights - 1,858 words
    Animal Rights Vs. Human Rights h Laboratory animals The use of laboratory animals is important to three main areas: biomedical research, product safety testing, and education. Biomedical researchers use animals to extend their understanding of the workings of the body and the processes of disease and health, and to develop new vaccines and treatments for various diseases. The research these people do isnt only for human benefit; it is also helping to develop veterinary techniques. The industry uses animals to test the effectiveness and safety of many consumer products, such as cosmetics, household cleaning products, pesticides, chemicals, and drugs. Educators, from elementary school all the ...
    Related: animal abuse, animal experimentation, animal research, animal rights, animal testing, animal welfare, human health
  • Captial Punisment - 1,423 words
    Captial Punisment Putting to death people who have been judge to have committed certain extremely heinous crimes is a practice of ancient standing. But in the United States, in the latter half of the twentieth century, it has become a very controversial issue. Changing views on this difficult issue led the Supreme Court to abolish capital punishment in 1972 but later turned to uphold it again in 1977, with certain conditions. Indeed, restoring capital punishment is the will of the people, yet many voices have been raised against it. Heated public debate have centered on questions of deterrence, public safety, sentencing equality, and the execution of innocents, among others. One argument sta ...
    Related: rand corporation, department of justice, controversial issue, refer, execution
  • College Degrees - 1,213 words
    College Degrees INTRODUCTION Many adults who graduate from high school immediately enter careers that do not require a college degree. Indeed, the majority of the adult population of the United States of America does not have college degrees. And the lack of degree is not a stigma. Vocations usually do not require degrees. Certainly the many trade vocations in the building industry do not require college degrees, but instead either vocational training, on-the-job training, and combinations of both. The same applies to manufacturing, clerical, retail, and service positions. And one does not need a degree, college, nor indeed high school, to become President of the United States, or any other ...
    Related: arts degree, bachelor of arts degree, college courses, college degree, college entrance
  • College Degrees - 1,133 words
    ... or DANTES, which administers its own exams, as well as the CLEP tests. Almost all military bases have an office of continuing education where preparatory studies are provided and tests administered. Information can be obtained from base information offices. Non- traditional colleges usually accept transcripts from DANTES. IV. COLLEGE COURSES Everyone lives near a regionally accredited college, either a four- year college, or a two-year community or junior college, and most colleges admit adults to credit courses, and issue transcripts that will be accepted by non-traditional colleges, if the courses meet the distribution requirements toward the degree. And for those who have previously t ...
    Related: college courses, college degree, college education, junior college, state college, year college
  • Computer Crime - 867 words
    Computer Crime Computer crime is a very broad term. It could mean anything from a total invasion by a hacker into the federal government or just the simple fact of one person letting another borrow a copy of his favorite flying game. Computers are defined in the dictionary as a machine that computes (WBD vol. 23). But to most people it is a machine that's helps us do a task easier. As we move into the 21th century though one thing is for sure, the computer will help crime become more prevalent. Hackers are probably one of the more common threats out there. These are the people who use modems and telephone lines to enter your computer. A teenager sits across the table yelling, "I want this an ...
    Related: computer crime, computer piracy, computer security, computer system, computer viruses, crime
  • Computers Have Changed The World Along With The Internet, Advanced Telecommunications Easier Travel A Global Community Has Be - 1,250 words
    ... s, Japan, Canada, Germany and the United Kingdom (Adams, p 69, 1998). This is shown in the assimilation of cultures from all across the world. Some examples of this include, Japanimation anime, Poke'mon, Canadian Television being viewed around the world (Much Music, Degrassi Jr. High) and the british Tele-Tubbies. These are examples of fads and social movements from other countries that have been assimilated almost universally. This global community and change can be seen on the Internet. The Internet The popularity of this new phenomenon is rising rapidly, almost beyond belief. In January 1994 there were an estimated 2 million computers linked to the Internet. However, this is nothing c ...
    Related: advanced research projects agency, computer science, computers, global community, telecommunications, travel, world language
  • Dr John Mcloughlin - 772 words
    Dr. John Mcloughlin John McLoughlin was one of the most influential figures of the fur trade and settlement periods of Pacific Northwest history. Chief Factor of the Columbia District of the British Hudson's Bay Company, he reigned as a benevolent autocrat, befriended Americans, and eventually became an American citizen at Oregon City. He was born in Quebec in 1784 and trained as a physician near Montreal. He became a physician and traveled to the Northwest region in 1824 as a representative of the Hudson Bay Company. Here he occupied the position of Chief Factor from 1825, when the regional headquarters of the company was moved from old Fort Astoria to Fort Vancouver, until his retirement i ...
    Related: pacific ocean, states department, roman catholic, 1848, territory
  • Economic Growth - 3,897 words
    ... eople to save by force will cause them to save less, and this is going to reduce the rate of growth. (183) First reduce the amount that can be saved. How can you reduce the amount that people are able to save? Well just take away some of their money. "Seize some of their income" theyll save less. (Rand 978) Personal income taxes are ideal for this purpose. First I will address the proportional tax. The proportional income tax is what is known as the flat tax. Proportional tax takes the same percentage of everybodys income it means that you have a single tax rate. Say 10% so if your income is $10,000 you pay a $1,000. If your income is $100,000 you pay $10,000. Now this is the least unjus ...
    Related: economic growth, global economic, interest payments, interest income, purchase
  • Ethics Of Animal Testing - 1,763 words
    Ethics Of Animal Testing This theme song to a popular cartoon is a farce dealing with experiments carried out on animals. In the cartoon one mouse is made very smart and wants to take over the world while the other is clearly not as smart. While the cartoon makes jokes, the reality is that mice and other animals re being used for medical tests every day. For some people this testing brings up ethical questions. One of the biggest questions: is it really necessary to take the lives of animals in the name of science and for the betterment of humanity? For animal rights activists, like People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the answer is no. PETA pressures labs into halting experim ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal liberation, animal research, animal rights, animal rights movement, animal testing, animal welfare
  • Fbi - 1,907 words
    F.B.I. The agency now known as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was founded in 1908 when Attorney General Charles J. Bonaparte appointed an unnamed force of Special Agents to be the investigative force of the Department of Justice (DOJ). Prior to that time, DOJ borrowed Agents from the U.S. Secret Service to investigate violations of federal criminal laws within its jurisdiction. By order of Attorney General George W. Wickersham, the Special Agent force was named the Bureau of Investigation in 1909. Following a series of changes in name, the Federal Bureau of Investigation officially received its present title in 1935. During the early period of the FBI's history, its Agents investi ...
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  • German Economy - 1,185 words
    German Economy The Federal Republic of Germanys economy has now flourished despite its harsh times that have been faced throughout the decades. Most people know about Germany from its historic involvement in World War II; its successful campaign to unite East and West with the successful collapse of the Berlin Wall; and its world class development and production of automobiles. Unfortunately, what most people dont know is that Germany continues to fight an uphill battle in keeping its established ranking among the worlds most important economic powers. A historic look back at Germany shows that after its fall in World War II, it needed a massive rebuilding in order regain its status that it ...
    Related: economy, free market economy, german, german economy, german government, market economy
  • Government Intervention And Its Disadvantages - 1,612 words
    Government Intervention And Its Disadvantages Government Intervention And Its Disadvantages Should our economy be run by a doctrine that was made popular by a group of French writers called physiocrats in the mid-1700s? This doctrine is called laissez-faire and it literally means to let or allow to do(The Family Education Network). It is a theory of economic policy which states that government generally should not interfere with decisions made in an open competitive market. These decisions include policies such as setting prices and wages. According to the doctrine of laissez-faire, workers are most productive and a nation's economy functions most efficiently when people can pursue their own ...
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  • Group 1 - 1,748 words
    Group1 1 OUR FOOD SYSTEM After a long hard day of work you sit down in your comfortable recliner and open up your favorite snack. But when you reach into grab a piece, you pull out a dead bug. Suddenly many thoughts come into your mind, you wonder how did the bug get there and was it dead or alive. Is it harmful or carry a disease. You ask yourself did the bug come from the United States or another country and where was your snack made? As all these questions come into your head, you wonder who can give you the answers. Fortunately, the government thought about these conflicts and established several governmental agencies to protect Americans in food safety. These agencies are responsible fo ...
    Related: environmental protection, president abraham lincoln, department of agriculture, parasites, consumers
  • Group 1 - 1,781 words
    ... ms can not be solved solely by Group 1 4 private actions. Not to be said that individuals cannot do anything to help the environment, especially in local communities, but that there are definitely power in numbers. The EPA programs cover many areas for the welfare of this country. Things such as protecting our water supply, air supply, supervising hazardous waste sites, testing toxic chemicals, and regulating pesticides that can enter our food storage. Before any pesticides or toxic chemical is sold in the United States, the EPA must approve the safety of the product, and set a limit to the amount that is allowed to be in the food that we consume. A chemical manufacturer devotes an avera ...
    Related: food and drug administration, genetic disease, federal food, dropping, sprays
  • History Of The Coputer - 2,118 words
    History Of The Coputer COMPUTER Generally, a computer is any device that can perform numerical Calculations --even an adding machine, an abacus, or a slide rule. Currently, however, the term usually refers to an electronic device that can use a list of instructions, called a program, to perform calculations or to store, manipulate, and retrieve information. Today's computers are marvels of miniaturization. Machines that once weighed 30 tons and occupied warehouse-size rooms now may weigh as little as three pounds (1.4 kilograms) and can be carried in a suit pocket. The heart of today's computers are integrated circuits (ICs), sometimes called microchips, or simply chips. These tiny silicon w ...
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  • Internet Tech - 1,099 words
    Internet Tech The Internet links people together via computer terminals and telephone lines (and in some cases wireless radio connections) in a web of networks and shared software. This allows users to communicate with one another wherever they are in the "net." This Internet link began as the United States military project Agency Network Advanced Research (ARPANET) during the Vietnam War in 1969. It was developed by the United States Department of Defenses (DOD) research people in conjunction with various contractors and universities to investigate the probability of a communication network that could survive a nuclear attack. For the first decade that the Internet was in existence, it was ...
    Related: internet access, internet communication, internet users, tech, lesbian gay
  • Kurdistan - 1,185 words
    Kurdistan Since the end of World War I, Kurdistan has been administered by five sovereign states, with the largest portions of the land being respectively in Turkey (43%), Iran (31%), Iraq (18%), Syria (6%) and the former Soviet Union (2%). The PKK's origins can be traced back to 1974, when calan, in Ankara, led a small group of radicals out of Revolutionary Youth (DEV-GENЗ). The Kurdistan Workers Party, "Partiya Karkeren Kurdistan" (PKK) was established in 1978. Цcalan, the leader of the organization took refuge in Syria, after 1980, following the efficient struggle against such organizations by the Turkish Security Forces. In the annual report of the U.S. State Department publi ...
    Related: kurdistan, cold war, south asian, small group, external
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