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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: biological warfare

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  • Aids Conspricay Is Aids Biological Warfare - 3,107 words
    Aids Conspricay - Is AIDS Biological Warfare? Refinance now homeowner even if you have bad credit. 185 loc Aids Conspricay - Is AIDS Biological Warfare? The following is a complete verbatim transcription from a recent broadcast of "Network 23", a program shown on a local Los Angeles Public Access Cable Channel. Good evening, I'm Michel Kassett. This is Network 23. A couple of weeks ago we had a program on the subject of AIDS, addressing the question of whether AIDS-the AIDS virus-was created by the government; and I'm sure that some people were quite shocked by what they heard. We spent that entire program relating to you the evidence of a very substantial amount of factual evidence which su ...
    Related: aids, aids research, biological, biological warfare, warfare
  • Chemical Biological Warfare - 920 words
    Chemical & Biological Warfare Ever since the beginning of time people have used tools, which were later called weapons. People have used weapons to defend his or her life, family, property, prosperity, country, and even his honor. Over the years weapons have improved greatly and people are still trying to make them even better. In earlier times when man started using weapons they were made of stones, sticks, fire, or whatever was available to them. Now, the weapons I speak of weren't as harmful and deadly as the weapons of today, but as the old story goes, David did kill the giant Goliath with a sling-shot and a stone. These weapons could still kill someone if they didn't receive the proper ...
    Related: biological, biological warfare, biological weapons, chemical weapons, warfare
  • The Development And Control Of Chemical And Biological Warfare - 1,121 words
    The Development and Control of Chemical and Biological Warfare In the year 600 BC. Solon who was a legislator of the Athenians, contaminated the River Pleisthenes with "skunk cabbage" to give the defenders of Kirrha violent diseases leading to their defeat. This is the first recorded use of plants as a source of chemicals for warfare. Although not very well known, chemical and biological warfare has been used for over 2000 years. "Chemical and Biological warfare has made a huge change since 600 BC and has changed into one of the most advanced and destructive types of warfare known to man." "There are many reason why chemical and biological warfare is so effective. Throughout the medieval tim ...
    Related: biological, biological and chemical weapons, biological warfare, biological weapons, chemical warfare, chemical weapons, disease control
  • Anthrax Vaccination Program - 1,394 words
    Anthrax Vaccination Program On May 18, 1998, Secretary of Defense William Cohen approved a plan to vaccinate all U.S. service members for anthrax. This plan has caused a fierce ethical debate over the legitimacy of this vaccination. The Department of Defense claims the vaccination is completely safe and has been in use for decades. Some doctors dispute this claim, and contend the vaccination may not be effective against weapon versions of anthrax. Many service members have refused the vaccination and have either separated or faced formal punishment for their decision. The Bioport Corporation of Lansing Michigan is the only company that produces the anthrax vaccine. According to a Phoenix Tim ...
    Related: anthrax, vaccination, microsoft encarta, quality control, visible
  • Bioterrorism - 1,831 words
    Bioterrorism You wake up early for work and kiss your family goodbye. On your daily transit you see a man drop a glass vial in the subway, but you think nothing of it. Moments later you become a statistic. A statistic of Bioterrorism. The threat of Bioterrorism, long ignored and denied, has heightened over the past years and needs to be publicly addressed. There are three possible solutions to this threat that are within grasp. The first of which would be a nation wide vaccination against all agents that could be used against the American public. Second, we could educate people to more efficiently spot the symptoms of such an act, or to protect themselves from an act that has already taken p ...
    Related: american public, human life, present danger, countless, outbreak
  • Bubonic Plague - 1,122 words
    Bubonic Plague Cantor states that, No one - peasant or aristocrat - was safe from the disease [bubonic plague], and once it was contracted, a horrible and painful death was almost a certainty. The dead and the dying lay in the streets abandoned by frightened friends and relatives (482). This certainly paints an accurate and horrifying picture of the fourteenth century during the plague. The bubonic plague, also known as the Black Death or The Plague, (Hindley 103) was one of the major scourges of the Middle Ages. It killed indiscriminately without remorse or thought of consequences. Because the plague was so widespread, theories about causes, blame and a variety of supposed cures abounded. M ...
    Related: bubonic, bubonic plague, plague, medical technology, medieval europe
  • Bubonic Plague - 1,197 words
    Bubonic Plague The Bubonic plague is a contagious disease, which can reach epidemic proportions, transmitted to humans by the fleas of an infected rat. The most telltale sign of the plague is the enlarged lymph nodes in the groin, armpit, or neck. The name for the Bubonic plague originated from the name for the swollen lymph nodes: Buboes. The disease is also called the Black Death. The reason for this nickname might have been the black spots on the skin or the purplish tint on an infected persons skin. The Black Death is known as the most fatal disease of the middle ages. The bacteria called Yersinia Pestis causes the disease. The whole cycle begins with an infected rat. A rat flea (Xenopsy ...
    Related: bubonic, bubonic plague, plague, biological warfare, middle ages
  • Countering Terrorism - 1,642 words
    Countering Terrorism Countering Terrorism There are currently more than 1500 terrorist organizations and groups being monitored in the United States. Terrorists by definition kill people and destroy property in order to advance a political agenda. We must make every effort to protect American citizens from these attacks. In the future that will require both state of the art measures to monitor terrorist activities and the movement of materials used for these activities, but also response scenarios in the event of an actual incident. The United States has consistently set a good example of no negotiations with terrorists and attempting to bring alleged terrorists to trial. We need to support ...
    Related: counter terrorism, countering, terrorism, soviet military, health organization
  • Genetic Engineering - 840 words
    Genetic Engineering Genetic Engineering Within the last two decades scientists have developed several new techniques, which manipulate and alter the genes found in the cells of living organisms. This wonder of the century, genetic engineering has turned heredity - the passing of inheritable characteristics from parent to off spring- from a natural, random event into a process that can be artificially controlled and exploited. It has the potential of giving humanity unprecedented power over life itself, and it has thus raised profound questions in such diverse areas as the environment, agriculture, biological warfare, and animal rights. Genetic engineering has clearly become the controversial ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic code, genetic engineering, human beings
  • How The Government May Have Created Aids - 4,554 words
    How the Government May Have Created AIDS The following is a complete verbatim transcription from a recent broadcast of "Network 23", a program shown on a local Los Angeles Public Access Cable Channel. FULL TRANSCRIPTION FROM NETWORK 23: Good evening, I'm Michel Kassett. This is Network 23. A couple of weeks ago we had a program on the subject of AIDS, addressing the question of whether AIDS -- the AIDS virus -- was created by the government; and I'm sure that some people were quite shocked by what they heard. We spent that entire program relating to you the evidence of a very substantial amount of factual evidence which supports the proposition that AIDS is a synthetic biological agent that ...
    Related: aids, aids research, american government, states government, united states government
  • How The Government May Have Created Aids - 4,360 words
    ... . Although decades have passed and untold billions have been spent in research, CANCER is still with us, the second major cause of death in America. The most dreaded fear that all oncologists (cancer doctors), virologists and immunologists live with is that some day CANCER in one form or another will become a contagious disease, transferable from one person to another. AIDS has now made that fear a reality and if you think you're safe because you're not gay or promiscuous, or because you're not sexually active, then you had better watch this videotape very carefully and then watch it again and again if necessary, until you fully understand what Dr. Strecker is telling you as he takes you ...
    Related: aids, world health, state legislature, molecular biology, agency
  • Imagine This Scenario: You And Another Fifteen Thousand Hockey Fans Decide To Spend The Night Watching The Washington Capital - 1,408 words
    Imagine this scenario: You and another fifteen thousand hockey fans decide to spend the night watching the Washington Capitals take on the Philadelphia Flyers. You get your tickets, your food, and your program and you sit down in your seat. You can barely wait for the game to start, let alone end, because you have so much money riding on this game. The 7:00 face-off begins exactly at 7:00, and thousands of eager hockey fans sit back to watch the game. Shortly after the face-off, terrorists trigger an explosive charge that showers poisonous chemicals over you and the rest of the crowd. The new stadium has become a hellhole of death and confusion. People all around you reel in all directions a ...
    Related: fans, fifteen, hockey, walk away, religious cult
  • International Terrorism - 1,127 words
    ... The Turkish government and their people must come to an agreement. Though the Turkish are hosts to these foreigners, they do not have the right to persecute them. This persecution will only lead to more violence. Terrorist Acts in Turkey are in a way, civil rights movements like that of African Americans in our country. Only after riots and killings did America realize it was time for a change. It is time for Turkey to realize this too. Israel and the occupied territories are one of the main targets for terrorist acts in the Middle East. Many of the attacks in this region are anti Israeli attacks by extremists and a couple of groups. Early in 1996, on four different occasions, Palestini ...
    Related: international terrorism, terrorism, biological warfare, ronald regan, worry
  • Preface In An Extensive Article In The Summerautumn 1990 Issue Of Top Secret, Prof J Segal And Dr L Segal Outline Their Theor - 1,209 words
    ... about 300 nucleotides, which does not exist in the visna virus. That length corresponds with what Coffin described. That section is particularly unstable, which indicates that it is an alien object. According to the Segals, it "originates in an HTLV-1 genome, (discovered by Gallo-ED) for the likelihood of an accidental occurrence in HIV of a genome sequence 60% identical with a section of the HTLV-1 that is 300 nucleotides in length is zero." Since the visna virus is incapable of attaching itself to human T4 receptors, it must have been the transfer of the HTLV-1 genome section which gave visna the capability to do so. In other words, the addition of HTLV-1 to visna made the HIV virus. ...
    Related: extensive, outline, preface, prof, segal
  • The Everchanging American Culture - 1,808 words
    The Ever-Changing American Culture The Ever-changing American Culture As Americans, we used to worry little about war, having enough to eat, travel, freedom, and our most basic everyday activities. The tragic events of September 11, 2001 have forever changed the American way of life. We have now become more concerned with our physical health because of the few cases of anthrax and the possibility of more biological warfare. We also worry about nuclear warfare and the effects it could have on our health and environment. Americans have certainly become more patriotic and involved with their families since September 11. Most of us watch the news diligently to learn of any defeat the United Stat ...
    Related: american, american culture, american involvement, most american, drug education
  • The Forgotten Chinese Holocaust - 1,595 words
    The Forgotten Chinese Holocaust Can you imagine your body being an object for experimentation while youre still alive? Thats one of the things the Japanese did to the Chinese during the forgotten holocaust, the Chinese holocaust. Among the universal disputes between many countries, Japanese aggression on the Chinese was one of the worst events in history to ever take place. The Japanese also destroyed many cities of China. Specifically, they destroyed the city of NanJing by conducting mass bombings and remorseless killings. Other examples of Japanese horrific actions against the Chinese happened in a place called Unit 731. During the 1920s, NanJing only had a population of 250,000. However, ...
    Related: chinese, chinese people, forgotten, holocaust, red cross
  • The Handmaids Tale - 1,754 words
    The Handmaid's Tale ISP Essay - The Handmaid's Tale Many fictitious novels written today mirror real life; this tactic can provide readers with a sense of formality. Yet in some cases, fictitious novels provide readers with the shocking realization of a society's self destruction. I believe The Handmaid's Tale, written by Margaret Atwood, falls in the second category. Issues raised in this novel such as manipulation, public punishment, ignorance, and pollution are problems we face in the world today. Atwood's conception of the future encompasses many of these problems, and her use of these extreme conditions force readers to recognize her book as a warning; against creating the realities of ...
    Related: handmaids tale, tale, the handmaid's tale, dark ages, issues raised
  • The Population Bomb - 797 words
    The Population Bomb By Paul Erhlich The book The Population Bomb, Paul Erhlich describes the impending problem of human overpopulation. Eventhough this book was written in the 1960s, Erhlich still brings up many points which are still valid in todays society. Environmental science often is not thought of by the public or the government, let alone the problem of human overpopulation, so this book served as one of the first looks into the issue. Environmental activists are often shunned as being too leftist or straight out insane. By making many logistical arguments, Mr. Erhlich shows us that environmental problems arent so farfetched. Erhlich speaks of several problems which are intertwined w ...
    Related: bomb, human population, silent spring, birth rate, horrible
  • Truman Doctrine Results - 1,151 words
    Truman Doctrine - Results The Truman Doctrine was the impetus for the change in United States foreign policy, from isolationist to internationalists; thus we were drawn into two wars of containment and into world affairs. The Truman Doctrine led to a major change in U.S. foreign policy from its inception - aid to Turkey and Greece - to its indirect influence in Korea and Vietnam. The aftermath of World War II inspired the U.S. to issue a proclamation that would stem Communist influence throughout the world. However, our zeal in that achievement sent our soldiers to die in Vietnam and Korea for a seemingly futile cause. It must be the policy of the U.S. to support free peoples. This is no mor ...
    Related: doctrine, truman, truman doctrine, marshall plan, republican congress
  • Using The Science Of Life As A Weapon - 1,413 words
    Using The Science Of Life As A Weapon I Introduction 1) Definition of Biological Warfare 2) Talking Points II Biological Weapons 1) Different Types Used 2) Applications III History of Biological Warfare 1) How It Has Been Used in Past Wars 2) How We Can Expect It to Be Used in the Future IV Are We At Risk of Being Attacked With Biological Weapons? 1) Defending Ourselves Against Biological Weapons V Conclusion Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) warfare is one of the most dreaded forms of attack on the battlefield. In the last century, we learned a great deal about how life works, how it is organized. We have used that technology to save many lives by curing diseases and vaccinating agains ...
    Related: science, weapon, present danger, south american, wartime
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