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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: union membership

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  • Decline In Union Membership In Australia - 1,584 words
    Decline In Union Membership In Australia TOPIC - The major issue tody facing the Australian trade union movement has been the decline in union density. What have been the causes, and how have the unions responded to the challenge. Figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) in 2000, show that the decline in Australian union membership continues, despite the efforts of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), to stop the slide. The ABS reports that trade union membership has dropped to 28 percent of the total workforce, compared to 1992, where there was 40 percent. (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2000.) Previous ABS findings show that these recent figures are part of ...
    Related: australia, decline, membership, trade union, union members, union membership
  • American Women During Wwii - 1,832 words
    American Women During Wwii American Women During World War II. America's entry into World War II posed opportunities for American women domestically, yet paradoxically heightened fears in the polity about the exact role that women should adopt during wartime. A central issue that dominated women's lives during this period was how to combine the private sphere of the home, with the new demands of the war economy in the public sphere. Women made significant gains in the military, the war economy and in some cases, in terms of political influence. Yet these gains were misleading for policy makers utilised the female workforce for short-term gains during war, with a long-term goal of seeing wome ...
    Related: american, american society, american women, black women, employed women, married women, men and women
  • Collective Bargaining In The Workplace - 2,241 words
    ... d by the parties to be a legally enforceable contract unless the agreement - (a) is in writing, and (b) contains a provision which (however expressed) states that the parties intend that the agreement shall be a legally enforceable contract (2) Any collective agreement which does satisfy these conditions in subsection (1)(a) and (b) above shall be conclusively presumed to have been intended by the parties to be a legally enforceable contract.' There are four main advantages claimed for the legal enforcement of collective agreements: (a) collective agreements would have to become both more comprehensive and more precise in defining the rights and obligations of each party if their meaning ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective bargaining, workplace, different levels
  • Depression Of The 1930s - 1,257 words
    Depression Of The 1930'S Depression of the 1930s The economic depression that beset the United States and other countries in the 1930s was unique in its magnitude and its consequences. At the depth of the depression, in 1933, one American worker in every four was out of a job. In other countries unemployment ranged between 15 percent and 25 percent of the labor force. The great industrial slump continued throughout the 1930s, shaking the foundations of Western capitalism and the society based upon it. Economic Aspects President Calvin COOLIDGE had said during the long prosperity of the 1920s that The business of America is business. Despite the seeming business prosperity of the 1920s, howev ...
    Related: depression years, economic depression, great depression, world war i, national product
  • Economics Of Europe - 1,499 words
    Economics Of Europe The Effects of Post-Industrialism On the Political Economy of Western Europe The Decline of Corporatist Bargaining The sustained, high economic growth in Western Europe during the post-war period until 1973 led to dramatic changes in the region's political economy. As advances in transportation and communication extended the reach of international trade into new areas of the world, as technological advances allowed establishment of manufacturing facilities overseas, and as European real wages climbed to unprecedented heights, the industrial base that had served as the foundation for rapid Western European growth in the 1950's and 1960's increasingly moved to Western Europ ...
    Related: economic conditions, economic growth, economic performance, economics, western europe
  • European Union - 792 words
    European Union In 1967, three European institutions merged. The three institutions were the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC), the European Economic Community (EEC), and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). When the three merged, they formed the European Community or EC. On November 1, 1993, the 12 members of the European Community ratified the Treaty on European Union, or Maastricht Treaty. The twelve members were- Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain. The countries of the Benelux Economic Union- Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg- continue to and in some ways as a single economic e ...
    Related: economic union, european coal, european community, european currency, european economic, european union, monetary union
  • History Of Unions And Their Relevance In Todays Society - 1,475 words
    History of Unions and Their Relevance in Today's Society $115 Designer Cosmetic Collection From Cosmetique -- Only $1! History of Unions and Their Relevance in Today's Society Following the lead of Britain from where many of the original settlers came, workers in various occupations banded together to form unions. Ship writers, boat builders, tailors, bakers and carpenters were among the first craft unions form in Australia before 1848. By forming an association workers could obtain better wages and working conditions. However the employers wanted the highest profit margins so wished to keep wages low and spend little money on the working environment. The law of supply and demand in the labo ...
    Related: history, relevance, union members, union membership, workers union
  • Labor Issues - 2,148 words
    Labor Issues Labor Unions: Aging Dinosaur or Sleeping Giant? The Labor Movement and Unionism Background and Brief History Higher wages! Shorter workdays! Better working conditions! These famous words echoed throughout the United States beginning in 1790 with the skilled craftsmen (Dessler, 1997, p. 544). For the last two-hundred years, workers of all trades have been fighting for their rights and seeking methods of improving their living standards, working conditions, and job security (Boone, 1996,p.287). As time went by, these individuals came to the conclusion that if they work together collectively, they would grow stronger to get responses to their demands. This inspired into what we kno ...
    Related: american labor, department of labor, labor, labor force, labor issues, labor movement, labor practices
  • Labor Issues - 2,199 words
    ... e people asked felt that unions are no longer necessary in todays American society. Furthermore, one in five of the sample population taking part in this survey were union members, and of these, 25% agreed that unions are no longer important (American Labor, 1998). The disparity in conclusions between these reports only begins to show the uncertainty facing the labor movement. Who Benefits From Unions? Before accounting for the decline in union enrollment, it suffices to consider who is impacted by todays unions? Literature is consistent in that members of strong unions tend to make more money and receive better benefits than non-union workers in the same jobs (Dessler, 1997). While unio ...
    Related: american labor, issues relating, labor, labor issues, labor movement, labor unions, organized labor
  • Labor Relations - 1,156 words
    Labor Relations This paper will attempt to discuss the cost and benefit of trade unionism, as it exists in the United States. To understand the pros and cons, it is important to understand the environment in which trade unionism developed and the needs they attempted to satisfy. It will discuss the evolution of Trade Unionism through the centuries. From that understanding we can discuss the topic as it relates to our current environment. Historians agree that American Unionism started in the early 19th Century. These early organizations were formed along the lines of Craft. Daniel Mills explains, in Labor Relations, Crafts people worked for themselves, or in small shops. They were often in c ...
    Related: child labor, labor, labor relations, labor union, federal laws
  • Labor Unions - 1,022 words
    Labor Unions Labor Unions What do you think of when you hear the phrase labor unions? Most people associate a negative connotation with labor unions. They think that labor unions are the only cause of strikes and work stoppages. Most think that people in unions are greedy and will do anything to get more money. Others swear by their unions, saying that their employers would take advantage of them if they didnt organize their unions. However as we prepare to enter the new millennium, labor unions are decreasing in size. Lets look at some of reasons. First, the numbers are unmistakable. At the end of 1997, when the most recent count was made, only 14.1% of workers belonged to unions, the lowes ...
    Related: american labor, labor, labor movement, labor relations, labor unions, union members, union membership
  • Labor Unions And Nursing - 1,455 words
    Labor Unions And Nursing The American Labor movement in the United States has a history dating back to the beginnings of the industrial revolution. Its existence is due to poor working conditions and exploitation during the beginning of that time. Labor unions have had a long history of using their most powerful weapon, strikes, to fight their battles. Even today, with the diminishing numbers of union members, strikes appear in the news sporadically. History of Labor Unions The first strike is thought to be by printers in Philadelphia in 1786 (Maidment, 1997). Working conditions, pay and benefits were so poor, leaders in the southern United States used them to justify slavery. Their contenti ...
    Related: american labor, international union, labor, labor market, labor movement, labor organization, labor relations
  • Party Structure Of United States And Great Britain - 1,607 words
    Party Structure Of United States And Great Britain Comparing the Party Structure of the United States and Great Britain When a decision on foreign policy has to be made, looking carefully about the nations' party is especially important. Not just on the basis of their clientele, their programmes and ideology but also on their structural characteristics. In this paper, I would like to focus on comparing the two super powers which are the United States and Great Britain. Both parties of the United States and Great Britain that have established themselves successfully within the party system , and which have managed to win seats at elections , possess three levels of organizational structure. F ...
    Related: american party, britain, democratic party, great britain, labor party, national party, organizational structure
  • Rich And Poor - 2,621 words
    ... or class politics. "During the electoral realignment of the 1930s, the Democrats gained the overwhelming allegiance of most manual workers and their unions", (Piven and Cloward 421). The alignment of the working class with the Democratic Party coalition developed two powerful strategies to combat the wealthy and business leaders. As stated previously, the workers held extreme striking power over the means of production in factories. Now they had power in the organization of the working class population and could coordinate their votes to consolidate political force for their perspectives. The concept is similar to how the employees of a corporation have incentives to pursue company goals ...
    Related: government action, national labor, democratic party, resembles, lexington
  • The Industrial Revolution Was Dawning In The United States At - 2,420 words
    The Industrial Revolution was dawning in the United States. At Lowell, Massachusetts, the construction of a big cotton mill began in 1821. It was the first of several that would be built there in the next 10 years. The machinery to spin and weave cotton into cloth would be driven by water power. All that the factory owners needed was a dependable supply of labor to tend the machines. As most jobs in cotton factories required neither great strength nor special skills, the owners thought women could do the work as well as or better than men. In addition, they were more compliant. The New England region was home to many young, single farm girls who might be recruited. But would stern New Englan ...
    Related: industrial revolution, industrial workers, living standards, samuel gompers, municipal
  • The Industrial Revolution Was Dawning In The United States At - 2,336 words
    ... day-to-day welfare of their members and should not become involved in politics. He also was convinced that socialism would not succeed in the United States but that practical demands for higher wages and fewer working hours could achieve the goal of a better life for working people. This was known as "bread and butter" unionism. There was one outstanding exception to the pragmatic "bread and butter" approach to unionism which characterized most of American labor. This was the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), a revolutionary labor union launched in Chicago in 1905 under the leadership of Eugene V. Debs. The IWW the overthrow of capitalism through strikes, boycotts and sabotage. Par ...
    Related: communist revolution, industrial revolution, industrial workers, industrial workers of the world iww, states congress, united states congress
  • Tommy Pearson - 683 words
    Tommy Pearson Pearson. Churchill. MacDonald. Trudeau. This list is composed of some of the greatest and most respected men to shape the history of Canada and who meld the country we live in into its current state. One notable but equally influential Canadian politician missing from this list is Tommy Douglas. Tommy Douglass government lasted from 1944 to 1960. During these sixteen years, he accomplished many great achievements, and brought in many important political changes to improve the health and living conditions of people all over the country. What exactly did Tommy Douglas accomplish that made him so great? Tommy Douglas was born in Falkirk, Scotland, on October 12, 1904. In 1910, his ...
    Related: pearson, tommy, living conditions, role model, earning
  • Trade Unions A Future - 1,542 words
    Trade Unions - A Future? Trade Unions - a future? A trade union is an independant self-regulating organization of workers created to protect and advance the interests of its members through collective action. Over recent years, it has become fashionable in many quarters to write off Britains trade unions, to label them as obsolete institutions out of touch with new realities and incapable of change. In todays world of individual employment contracts, performance-related pay schemes, Human Resource and Total Quality Management and all the other ingredients of the so-called new workplace, trade unions are often regarded as anachronistic obstacles preventing success of the market economy. As co ...
    Related: trade union, union members, union membership, union organization, legal advice
  • Unionism - 1,979 words
    Unionism Michael Paul 099 66 3949 History 316z Trade unionism, industrial unionism, and socialism were the main forms of organized labor in the late nineteenth century early twentieth century, yet rarely did these shifting currents flow in complementary ways that might appeal to the vast majority of struggling workers. The three most important formal organizations were the American Federation of Labor (AFL), the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) and the Socialist Party of America. All three of these organizations had there own strengths but the many weaknesses and divisions combined with outside influences caused the retardation of their radical, left wing ideas. The American Federation ...
    Related: unionism, labor unions, chicago press, political platform, canada
  • Wagner Act - 1,839 words
    Wagner Act Wagner Act What was the need for the Wagner Act? Before the WA, rights of workers were protected by the National Industry Recovery Act of 1933. In 1935, the Supreme Court declared the NIRA unconstitutional. By doing so, workers lost their rights to join unions of their choice and to bargain collectively. In 1935 the unemployment rate was over 21% and more than 50% lived in poverty as we measure it today. Large employers were said to have immense control over their workers who had at best, one single place to work. Those workers were paid less than their economic contribution measured by their productivity. Before the WA, the federal government had refrained from supporting collect ...
    Related: wagner, labor law, trade union, labor-management relations, indemnity
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