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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: unhappiness

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  • 1984 - 249 words
    1984 The lesson to be learned from George Orwell's 1984 is that an "ideal" of having a Utopian society will never really work. George Orwell may have written 1984, in order to show us that every society has it's ups and downs and that no matter how hard you work to keep the society perfect there will always be flaws. In the book 1984, the society in which the people lived was completely opposite to what most people would see as "utopia". As defined by the New Scholastic Dictionary the word "Utopia" means: a place where everything is perfect and everyone is happy. This is far from the life that the people lived in 1984. There was a lot of hate throughout the book, and with hate comes unhappin ...
    Related: 1984, utopian society, main character, george orwell, lesson
  • A Difference In Values - 1,051 words
    A Difference In Values A Difference in Values The House of Wang Lung rose in one generation from a family of poor farmers to a wealthy respected house in the novel The Good Earth by Pearl Buck. The dramatic change in social status causes the sons of Wang Lung to have different views and values from their father. His different treatment of each son also shapes each character. Although part of the same family the charachters demonstrate a difference in values. The father values the land, the youngest son values regognition, the middle son values wealth, and the eldest son values respect. As a result of his impoverished upbringing, Wang Lung values the land more than anything else. His obsessio ...
    Related: book reports, good earth, wang lung, glory, watches
  • A Lot Of Great Canadian Authors Base Their Books On The Prairie Or Land And Its Inhabitants Wild Geese By Martha Ostenso Is A - 1,025 words
    A lot of great Canadian authors base their books on the prairie or land and its inhabitants. Wild Geese by Martha Ostenso is a wonderful example of this. Throughout the novel, many references are made to natural elements and also animals. Three very noticeable references could be picked out. These references were made to Judith, who is seen as a wild horse, to the wild geese that always move to new places, and also to the weather and how the family's attitudes and emotions, especially Caleb's, are changed by it. Wild Geese are talked about quite frequently throughout this novel. There are many references to people who are compared to the wild goose, along with what they symbolize. Lind Arche ...
    Related: authors, canadian, inhabitants, martha, prairie
  • A Thematic Analysis Of Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho - 1,465 words
    A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Arts- Movies A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho has been commended for forming the archetypical basis of all horror films that followed its 1960 release. The mass appeal that Psycho has maintained for over three decades can undoubtedly be attributed to its universality. In Psycho, Hitchcock allows the audience to become a subjective character within the plot to enhance the film's psychological effects for an audience that is forced to recognise its own neurosis and psychological inadequacies as it is comp  elled to identify, for varying lengths of time, with the contrasting personalities of the film's m ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, psycho, thematic, thematic analysis
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn By Twain - 1,959 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn By Twain The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is based on a young boys coming of age in Missouri of the mid-1800s. This story depicts many serious issues that occur on the "dry land of civilization" better known as society. As these somber events following the Civil War are told through the young eyes of Huckleberry Finn, he unknowingly develops morally from both the conforming and non-conforming influences surrounding him on his journey to freedom. Hucks moral evolution begins before he ever sets foot on the raft down the Mississippi. His mother has died, and his father is constantly in a drunken state. Huck grows up following his own rules until he moves in with the ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn, twain
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,375 words
    Air Traffic Strike The Pressures of PATCO: Strikes and Stress in the 1980s By Rebecca Pels -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- Note on electronic format: you can access any citation by clicking on the note number. In order to leave citations and return to the main text of the document, press the Back key on your viewer. -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- On August 3, 1981 almost 13,000 air traffic controllers went on strike after months of negotiations with the federal government. During the contract talks, Robert Poli, president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Association (PATCO), explained the union's th ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, aviation safety
  • Anarchism And Liberalism - 1,399 words
    ... st groups to represent the labor force, minority groups, and any apathetic and helpless citizens. The presence of sub-government groups, such as big industry, are recognized as being insufficient in representing the public's interest and so the liberals call for more regulations to control these sub-governments from abusing their power. This goes right along with the whole philosophy of contemporary liberals in that they don't want to start over and rebuild the government, but rather reform it and ad more regulations to control it. The idea of a ruler goes against the basic stance of anarchism. Proudhon best describes this view when he said, "Whoever puts his hand on me to govern me is u ...
    Related: anarchism, contemporary liberalism, liberalism, free society, individual rights
  • Anna Karenina - 1,503 words
    Anna Karenina The world of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina is a world ruled by chance. From the very opening chapters, where a watchman is accidentally run over by a train at Moscow's Petersburg station, to the final, climactic scenes of arbitrary destruction when Levin searches for Kitty in a forest beset by lightning, characters are brought together and forced into action against their will by coincidence and, sometimes, misfortune. That Anna and Vronsky ever meet and begin the fateful affair that becomes the centerpiece of the novel is itself a consequence of a long chain of unrelated events: culminating Anna's sharing a berth with Vronsky's mother on her way to reconcile Dolly and Stiva in Mosco ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, immanuel kant, book of deuteronomy
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,621 words
    Anorexia Nervosa Anorexia is an eating disorder that usually strikes women between the ages of fifteen and thirty-five. An estimated one thousand females will die each year from anorexia. About eighty percent of females suffer from a sub clinical eating disorder and twenty percent will turn into full-blown anorexics in their lifetime. These are statistics that we know of. Anorexia can be hidden very well by many that suffer from it; therefore there are many cases we do not know of. Anorexia is a disorder in which preoccupation with dieting and thinness leads to excessive weight loss. The individual may not realize that weight loss or restricted eating is a problem. (Internet Mental Health ww ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, self image, mental health
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,013 words
    Anorexia Nervosa Many people suffer from the condition known as anorexia nervosa. Often the victims go through a number of symptoms that can lead to a serious amount of problems concerning a persons weight, happiness, and personality. People should keep a close eye out for anyone who shows signs of certain symptoms that become present later on in the future. What is Anorexia Nervosa? In medicine, Anorexia Nervosa is a condition characterized by an intense fear of gaining weight or becoming obese, along with a distorted body image, which leads to excessive weight loss from restricting food intake and exercising excessively. It is essentially self-starvation leading to a loss of body weight 15 ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, eating disorder, warning signs
  • At The Height Of His Career, Why - 522 words
    At The Height Of His Career, Why? At the Height of His Career, Why? Kurt Cobain was citied in the Seattle area with a shotgun. Days later on the fifth of April, Kurt Cobain went into the small room above his garage in his Seattle home and ended it all. Fans across the world were stunned by the news of Kurt Cobains sudden and shocking suicide. Kurt was the leader of the multiplatinum grunge band Nirvana, and was widely hailed as the John Lennon of his generation. He was a gifted song writer and erratic performer. However, Cobain's name was presented at times with disillusionment and unhappiness. Kurt had spoken, written lyrics, and even sung in his songs about suicide. Yet, one question coul ...
    Related: height, kurt cobain, drug addiction, social issues, bean
  • Awakening By Kate Chopin - 1,585 words
    Awakening By Kate Chopin "Every step which she took toward relieving herself from obligations added to her strength and expansion as an individual" (93) The Awakening by Kate Chopin introduces the reader to the life of Edna Pontellier, a woman with an independent nature, searching for her true identity in a patriarchal society that expects women to be nothing more than devoted wives and nurturing mothers. In this paper I will describe Ednas journey of self-discovery and explain why her struggle for independence is no easy task. I will also discuss the relationship Edna has with two other main women characters and describe how these women conform or rebel against a society with many social co ...
    Related: awakening, chopin, kate, kate chopin, the awakening
  • Aztec Empire History - 1,461 words
    ... per class. Aztec society, like all complex societies, had different social classes. People at the top - nobles, high priests, and people important in the military and government - had lives of luxury, with fine houses, clothing, and jewelry. The largest class was made up of commoners, such as farmers, servants, and craftspeople. In Aztec society, commoners were organized into clans, or groups, made up of many different families. Each clan joined people together throughout their lives. Members of a clan all lived in the same district. Merchants formed yet another class in Aztec society, separate from the commoners. The Aztecs carried on a great deal of trade with other Indian nations. Tra ...
    Related: aztec, aztec empire, aztec gods, empire, history
  • Bananafish - 713 words
    Bananafish Just why did Seymour kill himself Picture walking into a hotel room and finding a man dead on a bed. Upon closer inspection it becomes obvious that he has supposedly taken his own life with the gun that lay beside him. In talking to his wife who was asleep on the bed next to him when this incident occurred, it is learned that he just walked in the door and shot himself late the previous night. Out of the many questions that could be asked from this story, I believe that it is probably extremely important to consider why the main character, Seymour Glass, decided to commit suicide. What I believe to be the reason for Seymours suicide has two basic components: the spiritual depravit ...
    Related: little black, main character, different stages, glass, shift
  • Beyond The Problem Of Evil - 3,996 words
    Beyond The Problem Of Evil evil Beyond the Problem of Evil Introduction: The problem of evil is, in my opinion, the best point of departure for a fruitful dialogue between Christianity, traditionally conceived, and those strands of modern philosophy which have been perceived--indeed, have sometimes perceived themselves--as a threat to that tradition. As such, I will attempt first, to outline the problem of evil in the starkest terms possible, presenting Augustine's approach to its solution followed by a critical analysis; second, to present an alternative approach to the questions which give rise to the problem--an approach derived in large part from Spinoza and Nietzsche; and, third, to sho ...
    Related: good and evil, falls short, human experience, free choice, referring
  • Beyond The Problem Of Evil - 3,962 words
    ... is caught in his illusion of volition . . . [This illusion], his assumption that free will exists, is also part of the calculable mechanism ( 106). When a misfortune strikes, we can overcome it either by removing its cause or else by changing the effect it has on our feelings . . .( 108). There are elements in each of these texts--e.g., the denial of free will, the rejection of the idea retributive justice, and the recognition of possibility of overcoming our emotional reactions rather than our external environment--which resonate with the sympathetic reader of Spinoza. And while, in later years, Nietzsche loses some of his positivistic fervor, we shall see that significant similarities ...
    Related: good and evil, spoke zarathustra, heavenly father, c. s. lewis, attain
  • Black Elk - 1,125 words
    Black Elk "For the power is not in us anymore." "After the Heyoka ceremony, I came to live here where I am now between Wounded Knee Creek and Grass Creek. Others came too, and we made these little gray houses of logs that you see, and they are square. It is a bad way to live, for there can be no power in a square. You have noticed that everything an Indian does is in a circle, and that is because the Power of the World always works in circles, and everything tries to be round. In the old days when we were a strong and happy people, all our power came to us from the sacred hoop of the nation, and so long as the hoop was unbroken, the people flourished. The flowering tree was the living center ...
    Related: wounded knee, great spirit, prisoners of war, significance, expressing
  • Brave New World - 713 words
    Brave New World Brave New World George Santayana once said, "Ideal society is a drama enacted exclusively in the imagination." In life, there is no such thing as a "complete utopia", although that is what many people try to achieve. Aldous Huxley's Brave New World is an attempt at a utopian society. In this brave new world, mothers and fathers and family are non-existent. Besides being non-existent, when words of that sort are mentioned, ears are covered and faces of disgust are made. In a report to the Controller, Bernard wrote," ... This is partly due, no doubt to the fact that he heard them talked about by the woman Linda, his m-----"(106). Words of the sort cannot even be written. Art, h ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, aldous huxley, book reports, bernard
  • Brave New World By Huxley - 704 words
    Brave New World By Huxley John the savage and Mustapha Mond the world controller both have their separate ideas of what happiness is. Mustapha defends the new society, pointing out the advantages that the savage world does not have, and what he perceives as the people being happy. "But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, and I want goodness. I want sin." "In fact," said Mustapha Mond, "you're claiming the right to be unhappy." "All right then," said the Savage defiantly, "I'm claiming the right to be unhappy." "Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent. The right to have syphilis and cancer; the right to have too little to eat ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, huxley, personal identity, everyday life
  • British In 19th - 1,840 words
    British In 19th The nineteenth (19th) century was a period of great change and accompanying social unrest in the British Isles. Most outstanding among the changes was the industrial revolution. As everything in life, it brought good, but it also brought evil. The industrial revolution combined with the expansion of the British Empire made the United Kingdom, the richest and most powerful country in the world. Some of the islanders became unbelievably wealthy, but others, unfortunately, became unbelievably poor. Writers from this historical period cognizant of the human suffering, became social critics of what was taking place in England, of how the rich and powerful became more oppressive th ...
    Related: british, british empire, british isles, british society, united kingdom
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