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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: undesirable

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  • Why Presidentialism Is Undesirable In A Newly Founded Democracy: Brazils Struggle To Liberalize - 1,650 words
    Why Presidentialism is Undesirable in a Newly Founded Democracy: Brazil's Struggle to Liberalize Brazil's transformation from an authoritarian regime to a presidential democracy was a slow and faltered attempt. From the early suggestions of democratic development, there were both administrations that contributed to democratic growth, as well as administrations that opposed this liberalization. This led to an instability in the Brazilian form of democratic government, their economy, and their political parties. The people's reactions to these instabilities confirm the fact that the Brazilian democratic regime was not working effectively. Even though Brazil was governed under a democratic syst ...
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  • Why Presidentialism Is Undesirable In A Newly Founded Democracy: Brazils Struggle To Liberalize - 1,640 words
    ... ons. Censorship of the media was re-implemented by Geisel. In remembering the past, the Geisel administration recalled the MDB upset victories in the 1974 elections. Soon after, the government pushed a bill known as the "Falco Law" through Congress, which severely limited radio and television involvement in the 1976 municipal elections. The Geisel government resorted to these measures when they realized the possibility of MDB victories in the upcoming elections. However, even with these strict media regulations, the MDB still managed victories in the larger urban areas. Geisel was forced to take decisive action since his party had lost two-thirds its seats in Congress. Using the Fifth In ...
    Related: founded, newly, undesirable, foreign debt, political prisoners
  • Downs Syndrome, Turners Syndrome, And Redgreen Color Blindness - 682 words
    1.) Three genetic disorders are Down's syndrome, Turner's syndrome, and Red-green color blindness. They are all caused by undesirable genes inherited by normal genetic mechanisms. These mutations are usually recessive because dominant ones usually die. Turner's Syndrome is caused by faulty cell division known as non disjunction. This occurs when chromosomes fail to separate. IN this disorder, the affected have one "x" chromosome. The effect are an underdeveloped female, mental retardedness, and sterility. Down syndrome is a condition caused by an oddosome that occurs on the pair #21. It results in severe abnormality physical and mental defects. For example, shorter bubble-shape eyes, short f ...
    Related: blindness, down syndrome, downs, cell division, external environment
  • 1984: A Bleak Prediction Of The Future - 1,222 words
    1984: A Bleak Prediction Of The Future Nineteen Eighty-Four was written by a major contributor to anticommunist literature around the World War II period, and is one of the greatest stories of an anti-utopian society ever. Nineteen Eighty-Four was not written solely as an entertaining piece of literature or as a dream of what the future could be like, it was written as a warning of what could happen as a result of communism and totalitarianism. This was not necessarily a widely popular vision of the future at the time of publication, but it was certainly considered a possibility by many people. The popular vision of the future, if analyzed as from a character in the book's point of view, som ...
    Related: bleak, prediction, television shows, big brother, orgasm
  • A Farewell To Arms - 803 words
    A Farewell To Arms Love is impossible to explain or fully understand; it is enfable and war is merely an outcome of disputes between ignorant aristocrats. A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway, is a novel about love and war. The narrator, Fredrick Henry is a war-time ambulance driver, and Catherine Barkley is an English nurse, who find themselves in a love affair which must maneuver itself around the restrictions of World War I. The novel begins in Gorizia, Italy the center of operations for Fredricks troop, World War I. Fredrick is an American volunteer and in the Ambulance Corps for the Italian Army. He meets a English nurse Catherine named Barkley and does not truly fall in love with he ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell, farewell to arms, world war i, the narrator
  • A Nobel Writing Style Reviewed - 997 words
    A Nobel Writing Style Reviewed Earnest Hemmingway is an accomplished author with a large audience. While short novels like The Old Man and the Sea have intrigued many, his war stories have won him a Nobel Prize. Hemmingway possesses a writing style all his own, his ability to write descriptively is unparalleled. His use of similar themes, symbolism, irony, and similar main characters is very profound. Hemmingways use of theme makes his writing style significant. In The Old Man and the Sea Santiago went through a lot of trouble to catch his magnificent fish and didnt want to loose it. The author writes, He did not want to look at the fish. He knew that half of him had been destroyed. This quo ...
    Related: nobel, nobel prize, writing style, open door, good night
  • A Postmodern Age - 1,398 words
    ... t is the idea that areas of existence and culture can be separated from, that is abstracted out of, other areas of existence and culture. In addition, we tend to form social groups that are largely based on abstractions (corporations, nations, economic classes, religious preferences, race (which is really an abstract rather than a physical or biological category or relationship), sexual preferences, etc.). As a result, membership in social groups tends to be unstable and transitory as one can easily move between social groups. This, again, creates a high sense of anxiety and tension; this anxiety results, on the one hand, in attempts within these abstract groups to define and redefine th ...
    Related: postmodern, social life, media images, popular culture, ties
  • A Quantum Computer A Future Technology - 1,415 words
    A Quantum Computer... a future technology Mike Damewood By the strange laws of quantum mechanics, Folger, a senior editor at Discover, notes, an electron, proton, or other subatomic particle is "in more than one place at a time," because individual particles behave like waves, these different places are different states that an atom can exist in simultaneously. Ten years ago, Folger writes, David Deutsch, a physicist at Oxford University, argued that it may be possible to build an extremely powerful computer based on this peculiar reality. In 1994, Peter Shor, a mathematician at AT&T Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, proved that, in theory at least, a full-blown quantum computer could factor ...
    Related: quantum, quantum computer, quantum mechanics, technology, simple steps
  • A Study Of The Book Of Mark - 1,441 words
    A Study of the BOOK of MARK annon An Essay for Humanities Courses That Treat The Bible As A Historical Document MARK'S THEOLOGY REFLECTED IN WRITING Mark and the other evangelists used basically five ways to change, edit or enhance Jesus' sayings to reflect their own views of Christianity. According to the Five Gospels Book, plagiarism and changing of writing was not a crime, but actually very common Mark's time. Besides, Mark never knew Jesus first-hand, he somehow had to make a 'story' from basically Hearsay! Mark groups different parables and sayings of Jesus by topic; making a false impression that these things happened in order. This may have little effect on changing the meaning of the ...
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  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,088 words
    ... in acceptance of the Republican senatorial nomination (June 16, 1858) Lincoln suggested that Douglas, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, and Democratic presidents Franklin Pierce and James Buchanan had conspired to nationalize slavery. In the same speech he expressed the view that the nation would become either all slave or all free: "A house divided against itself cannot stand." The underdog in the senatorial campaign, Lincoln wished to share Douglas's fame by appearing with him in debates. Douglas agreed to seven debates: in Ottawa, Freeport, Jonesboro, Charleston, Galesburg, Quincy, and Alton, Ill. Lincoln knew that Douglas--now fighting the Democratic Buchanan administration over the cons ...
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  • Age Of Foolishneit Was The Best Of Times, It Was The Worst Of Times, It Was The Age Of Wisdom, It Was The Ss - 463 words
    age of foolishneIt was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the ss . .. Dickens begins A Tale of Two Cities with this famous sentence. It describes the spirit of the era in which this novel takes place. This era is the latter part of the 1700s - a time when relations between Britain and France were strained, America declared its independence, and the peasants of France began one of the bloodiest revolutions in history. In short, it was a time of liberation and a time of terrible violence. Dickens describes the two cities at the center of the novel: Paris, a city of extravagance, aristocratic abuses, and other evils that lead to revolution and London, ...
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  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,545 words
    AIDS Related Stigma Since the appearance of AIDS in the late seventies and early eighties, the disease has had attached to it a significant social stigma. This stigma has manifested itself in the form of discrimination, avoidance and fear of people living with AIDS (PLWAs). As a result, the social implications of the disease have been extended from those of other life threatening conditions to the point at which PLWAs are not only faced with a terminal illness but also social isolation and constant discrimination throughout society. Various explanations have been suggested as to the underlying causes of this stigmatization. Many studies point to the relationship the disease has with deviant ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, early years, seventies, stigma
  • Alcohol And Drug Abuse Among College Students - 906 words
    Alcohol And Drug Abuse Among College Students Jon Rigell English 101-07 Cause and Effect Essay Dangerous Acts Alcohol and drug abuse has been an active habit among college students sense the 1960s. The immediate cause of this behavior was the youth's need to rebel against the overly conservative American society. This rebellion led to a since of freedom for the young adults, which caused them to continue acting in these unintelligent manners. After a short period of time, late teens just did not belong if they were not participating in the mischievous acts. Substance abuse quickly became a way of life for many young adults. As a result, this inapt behavior still continues today. To first-tim ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol and drugs, college campus, college students, drug abuse, students fail
  • Also Known As - 753 words
    Also Known As. Nicknames are a substitute of a name given to a person in fun, affection, and belittlement, usually descriptive. They can also be used to shorten a person's name, like "Dick," for Richard. Nicknames, whether positive or negative, are only describing a person's general characteristics. Although hurtful nicknames can lower a persons' reputation and self-esteem, joyful nicknames give the person a sense of pride. O.K., first of all people sometimes take a nickname way too far. People might be given a nickname for that one single little thing they did, and somehow it gets turned into a nickname that sticks for a long time. For example: One day my friend was at our lunch table, in h ...
    Related: self esteem, lose weight, high school, hurtful, geek
  • Although At First Sight The Dsmiv Classification System Appears To Provide Clinicians With A Useful Framework Of Which To Vie - 1,974 words
    Although at first sight the DSM-IV classification system appears to provide clinicians with a useful framework of which to view their clients, on closer inspection however, the picture is somewhat less satisfactory. Criticisms of the system range from Wakefield's (1997) analysis that psychological presentation ranges from problems of living to harmful dysfunction; through to Livesley, Schroeder & Jang's (1994) counter-argument that evidence of discontinuity between different diagnoses and normality would support the DSM's proposal of distinct diagnostic categories. Since these issues involved are quite distinct, both these points of view are presented in relation to a cause and consequence d ...
    Related: classification, framework, university press, mental disorder, application
  • American Women During World War Ii - 1,808 words
    ... ing the war years for many men hoped that marriage would defer conscription to the war. This alone suggests that women's roles as wives and mothers were still dominant during the war because the nation witnessed a 25 percent rise in the population aged five and under. The popularity of marriage and the traditional gender roles that marriage carried, was exploited during the war. For example, the Office of War Information, established in the summer of 1942, worked closely with the media. President Roosevelt soon denied the OWI was being used for propaganda , yet only months after the OWI was formed, wartime propaganda began to likened women's war work to domestic chores. These trends serv ...
    Related: after world, american, american politicians, american propaganda, american society, american women, black women
  • American Women During Wwii - 1,810 words
    ... during the war years for many men hoped that marriage would defer conscription to the war. This alone suggests that women's roles as wives and mothers were still dominant during the war because the nation witnessed a 25 percent rise in the population aged five and under. The popularity of marriage and the traditional gender roles that marriage carried, was exploited during the war. For example, the Office of War Information, established in the summer of 1942, worked closely with the media. President Roosevelt soon denied the OWI was being used for propaganda , yet only months after the OWI was formed, wartime propaganda began to likened women's war work to domestic chores. These trends ...
    Related: american, american history, american politicians, american propaganda, american society, american women, black women
  • Analysis On Bulgaria - 4,272 words
    Analysis On Bulgaria External historical events often changed Bulgaria's national boundaries in its first century of existence, natural terrain features defined most boundaries after 1944, and no significant group of people suffered serious economic hardship because of border delineation. Postwar Bulgaria contained a large percentage of the ethnic Bulgarian people, although numerous migrations into and out of Bulgaria occurred at various times. None of the country's borders was officially disputed in 1991, although nationalist Bulgarians continued to claim that Bulgaria's share of Macedonia--which it shared with both Yugoslavia and Greece--was less than just because of the ethnic connection ...
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  • Anarchy - 1,645 words
    Anarchy Anarchism seems to be defined many ways by many different sources. Most dictionary definitions define anarchism as the absence of government. A leading modern dictionary, Webster's Third International Dictionary, defines anarchism briefly but accurately as, "a political theory opposed to all forms of government and governmental restraint and advocating voluntary cooperation and free association of individuals and groups in order to satisfy their needs." Other dictionaries describe anarchism with similar definitions. The Britannica-Webster dictionary defines the word anarchism as, "a political theory that holds all government authority to be unnecessary and undesirable and advocates a ...
    Related: anarchy, william godwin, working class, utopian society, empower
  • Ancient Art Of Parenthood - 1,602 words
    Ancient Art Of Parenthood Children walk home from school every day and never realize what lurks beyond their protected space (Miller 105). In todays world the acceptance of latch key children should not be tolerated. Unfortunately, our society condones such behavior from the adults. As a result, these children wear a chain around their neck with a house key attached, in order to enter into their home. As the youngsters leave school, they enter a silent world (Kay 94). To illustrate, children enter into an empty house which has been abandoned since breakfast that morning. Therefore, television when turned on, replaces the absence of their parents. At this time, children experience serious con ...
    Related: ancient art, parenthood, human race, illegal drugs, regard
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