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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: binge

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  • Binge Crinking - 910 words
    Binge Crinking From one generation to the next, we have seemingly continued this ridiculous practice of "binge drinking". Sure, let's all see who can drink the most, who passes out first, and let's not forget throwing-up? Yes, you haven't experienced the true effects of binge drinking until you've thrown-up all over yourself. But why, why is it that today's generation feels that this is fun? Risking your life to fit in isn't fun. Fun is going to an amusement park or even a baseball game. Unfortunately, college campuses across the nation are preoccupied by this issue of alcohol abuse. Binge drinking in the U.S. is out of control and mostly a problem that our government has produced. It is a b ...
    Related: binge, binge drinking, public health, amusement park, europeans
  • Binge Drinking - 677 words
    Binge Drinking My report is on the disease binge drinking. Binge drinking is a dangerous drinking problem that many people have. A binge is defined as five or more alcoholic drinks in one sitting for a man, and four for a woman. Binge drinking is extremely common among American high school and college students. In fact, one-third of high school and college students admit to a binge in the last 30 days. I think that this high rate is reasonable since drinking is still seen as a popular activity in many colleges as seen in the horrible accidents in the newspaper or on television. On television shows and in movies binge drinking is rarely shown as a dangerous and horrible thing. Alcohol is more ...
    Related: binge, binge drinking, drinking, fetal alcohol syndrome, social issues
  • Binge Drinking Final - 1,356 words
    Binge Drinking (Final) Drinking has become an increasing problem in our society. Many people now see drinking as a norm. Lisa McIntyre, author of The Practical Skeptic states that, "For one thing, we know that norms vary across societies" (152). So we also know that what is considered to be deviant varies across societies." How could members of our society see drinking as anything but a norm when everywhere one turns alcohol is being advertised? Whether it be on billboards, busses, in magazine ads, or television commercials, alcohol is everywhere and it seems as though everyone is drinking it. Gone are the times of prohibition, when alcohol was seen as evil. After doing quantitative research ...
    Related: binge, binge drinking, drinking, quantitative research, work experience
  • Binge Drinking Final - 1,300 words
    ... as our dependent variable, and operationalized the independent variable of working, which asks the question, "Was respondent working or unemployed the previous week?". Here are the results: Table IV: A Person's Level of Employment and Whether Marijuana Should be Made Legal or Not The data supported our theory. Those who were unemployed at the time of the survey were far more likely to favor the legalization of marijuana (46.9% to 29.0%) than people who worked. While the correlation was weak, the results were very statistically significant. Curious about whether a person's age effected the results, we decided to control for age. The results remained the same. In each age category those wh ...
    Related: binge, binge drinking, drinking, drinking age, legal drinking
  • Binge Drinking In Colleges - 213 words
    Binge Drinking In Colleges A study conducted by researchers at Harvard University found that binge drinking continues to be a widespread problem among U.S. colleges, Reuters reported Sept. 10. In particular, the report identified binge drinking among fraternity and sorority students as a major concern. The study, led by Harvard School of Public Health professor Henry Wechsler, was conducted in 1997 at 116 campuses in 39 states. A total of 14,521 students were interviewed. The researchers found that 42.7 percent of students were binge drinkers, with 20.7 percent frequent binge drinkers. In addition, 81.1 percent of those living in fraternity or sorority houses were binge drinkers. Binge drink ...
    Related: american college, binge, binge drinking, drinking, harvard school
  • Greeks Binge Drinking - 1,046 words
    Greeks & Binge Drinking Greeks and Binge Drinking Greek life has always had its problems with underage and binge drinking. Though, lately it seems like the number of problems and even deaths due to binge drinking has been on the rise. To try curbing these problems, the Pan-Hellenic council, which is the governing body of all sororities on CMUs campus, has decided to drastically change one of their alcohol policies. This change has come in the form of article 12 which states, that no sorority or sorority member may partake in any party at a fraternity house, were alcohol is present. On the other hand, fraternities here at CMU are not showing the same support for article twelve that sororities ...
    Related: binge, binge drinking, drinking, greek life, spring semester
  • Abortion Essay - 902 words
    Abortion Essay Abortion Essay In the past decades, a serious issue has come into a worldwide viewpoint. This issue, abortion, has become a massive concern and needs to be paid close attention to! Abortion should be outlawed in the U.S. forever. There needs to be a law to stop all abortions. Due to overwhelming evidence, having an abortion should be made illegal in the U.S. because there are three important ways that abortion hurts people worldwide. First, women who choose to have an abortion might suffer psychological damage. After a woman goes through the procedure of the abortion, she might start having nerve disorders, sleep disorders, regrets, or be recommended for psychiatric care. If t ...
    Related: abortion, health risks, eating disorders, cigarette smoking, abstinence
  • Alcohol - 654 words
    Alcohol Alcohol Alcohol is a drug, but unlike most of the other drugs, it is socially accepted and is legal. Alcohol is bad for you and does have long term affects associated with it. Such as the long addiction to it, effects on the body, and the social interaction effects. Alcohol, and alcoholism is common in America, but drinking is more common around kids. Social drinking, a term kids and drinkers have come accustom to, is defined by one standard drink per hour, and no more than 3 per day, but some people just socialize around people that drink as heavily as they do and confuse that for social drinking. Addiction to alcohol can be acquired easily if not careful, binge drinking and family ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol consumption, binge drinking, drunk driving, drugs
  • Alcohol Abuse Among College Students And Possible Solutions - 1,040 words
    Alcohol Abuse Among College Students And Possible Solutions Running head: ALCOHOL ABUSE AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS Alcohol Abuse Among College Students and Possible Solutions Terry McDaniel Georgia Southern University Abstract Binge or excessive drinking is the most serious problem affecting social life, health, and education on college campuses today including the campus of Georgia Southern University. Binge or excessive drinking by college students has become a social phenomena in which college students do not acknowledge the health risks that are involved with their excessive drinking habits. Furthermore college students do not know enough about alcohol in general and what exactly it does to ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol abuse, college campuses, college drinking, college students
  • Alcohol Abuse Among College Students And Possible Solutions - 1,076 words
    ... accidents is probably the biggest cause of deaths among the 300,000 college students that will eventually die because "drinking and driving has been reported by 60% of college men and 50% of college women who are binge drinkers" (The College Experience, 2001). Also "75% of male students and 55% of female students involved in acquaintance rape had been drinking at the time" (Drinking: A Students Guide, 2001). "Between 75% and 90% of all violence on campuses is alcohol related" (Marcus, 2000, p. 53). "Alcohol is a factor in 66% of student suicides and 60% of all sexually-transmitted diseases" (Marcus, 2000, p. 53). Besides just misfortunes and deaths among college students who abuse alcoho ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol consumption, college students, college women, female students
  • Alcohol Abuse In American Youth - 1,635 words
    Alcohol Abuse In American Youth It has been stated in each research source that hazing and particularly binge drinking is the most serious problem affecting social life, academic life, and health on college campuses today. The journal article pertaining to this issue, How Harvards College Alcohol Study Can Help Your Campus Design a Campaign Against Student Alcohol Abuse (CAS: Campus Alcohol Study for short), focuses more heavily on binge drinking and prevention than it does on the Greek system itself. The authors, Wechsler, Nelson, and Weitzman, contend that binge drinking is a nationally recognized problem but has not been studied efficiently enough to warrant effective prevention plans. Th ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol consumption, american, american youth
  • Alcohol And The Effects On Behavior - 1,596 words
    Alcohol And The Effects On Behavior Alcohol and The Effects on Behavior The articles in which I reviewed dealt with alcoholism and the many different effects it has on behavior. The purpose for each experiment differs, but they all deal whit alcohol and the effects of its behavior. In each of the articles used to complete this research a comparison was mead between people who had been affected by alcoholism to people who had not. The reason for this was to see if alcohol had any effect on an individuals behavior. In the first study which was done by Wright et. Al, they tested to see if non-adult children of alcoholics (ACAs) who were college students differ from nonclinical ACA college stude ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol consumption, drinking behavior, first year, social support
  • Alcohol In College - 1,230 words
    Alcohol In College compuserve (underage drinking statistics) * A typical American college students spends more on beer than they do on textbooks * Junior and senior high school students drink 35% of all wine coolers sold in the United States and 1.1 billion cans of beer each year. *More than million students drink when they are alone; more than 4 million drink when they are upset; and nearly 3 million drink when they are bored. *A sixteen year old student is more likely to die from a drinking related problem than any other. Summary of Information: Underage drinking and the legal limit of when a person is able to drink is a contributing factor to the causes of death among teens these days. Th ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol dependence, american college, blood alcohol, college students, drink alcohol
  • Alcohol In College - 1,133 words
    Alcohol In College Alcohol is a huge problem on most college campus's. Twenty one may be the legal drinking age, but some how minors find a way to get a hold of alcohol. People as young as fifteen are able to get their hands on an alcoholic beverage. Alcohol is said to be the chosen drug among college students. College students have a tendency to drink more then the general population. It is said that college students spend approximately $4.2 billion annually an alcohol. This money is spent on 430 gallons of alcoholic beverages, and 4 million cans of beer. The type of college, geographical location, the ethnic and gender makeup plays a role in the amount of drinking that occurs on campus. Fo ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol consumption, alcohol problems, attending college, college campus, college students
  • Alcoholism - 1,581 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism is a disease of epidemic proportions, affecting 9.3 to 10 million Americans, and many professionals believe the figures are closer to 20 million (Weddle and Wishon). Alcoholism is a "physiological or physiological dependence on alcohol characterized by the alcoholics inability to control the start or termination of his drinking"(Encyclopedia Britannica 210). It consists of frequent and recurring consumption of alcohol to an extent that causes continued harm to the drinker and leads to medical and social problems. Alcoholism, however, does not merely cause harm to the alcoholic, but to the entire family as well, affecting an estimated 28 million children in this country ...
    Related: alcoholism, high school, human beings, social problems, fail
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,066 words
    Alcoholism is a wide-ranging and complex disease that heavily plagues society. Drinking is defined as the consumption of a liquid, and/or the act of drinking alcoholic beverages especially to excess. Every year alcohol is responsible for 1/2 of all murders, accidental deaths, and suicides; 1/3 of all drowning, boating, and aviation deaths; 1/2 of all crimes; and almost 1/2 of all fatal automobile accidents (Overview 1). Alcohol is a potent nonprescription drug sold to anyone over the national legal drinking age, 21. Unlike carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, which can be manufactured by the body, alcohol is a substance that is not made within the body. It is a food, because it supplies a conc ...
    Related: alcoholism, binge drinking, consumption, drinking, drinking age, drinking coffee, heavily
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,012 words
    ... igestive enzymes, which can irritate the stomach wall, producing heartburn, nausea, gastritis, and ulcers. The stomach of a chronic drinker loses the ability to adequately move food and expel it into the duodenum, leaving some food always in the stomach, causing sluggish digestion and vomiting. Alcohol may also inflame the small and large intestine (Overview 4). Moderate daily drinking may be good for the heart, but for many the risks outweigh the benefits. Even one binge may produce irregular heartbeats, and an alcohol abuser experience increased risk of high blood pressure, heart attacks, heart arrhythmia, and heart disease. Alcohol may cause cardiomyopathy (a disease of the heart musc ...
    Related: alcoholism, consumption, drinking, heart disease, heavily, legal drinking
  • Alcoholosm - 1,240 words
    Alcoholosm Within the context of our society, drinking of alcohol is a perfectly normal activity. For most people drinking a moderate amount of alcohol can be beneficial, indeed studies suggest that moderate drinking may protect against coronary heart disease by improving insulin resistance (Gold, 1991). However, for a minority of people drinking alcohol is an activity that is fraught with danger and, for a very few, is akin to taking a poison that will almost inevitably ruin their lives. Henceforth, it is important for research purposes to define who an alcoholic is and what the effects of alcohol on that person are. An alcoholic is a person who drinks excessive amounts of alcohol habituall ...
    Related: personality type, severe mental, contributing factor, personality, drinking
  • American Indians - 929 words
    American Indians Indians in eastern North America possessed no alcohol at the beginning of the colonial period. By 1800, so much alcohol flowed through the Indian villages east of the Mississippi that each community were forced to decide to take it or not and they made a tragic choice by taking it because it destroyed their cultural. The Indians who drank did so to the point of intoxication enjoyed the experience they got from it. If Indians chose to drink out of frustration and despair, they were not alone; as social scientists have made clear, whenever Western societies undergo periods of rapid transition, rates of drinking increase. Documentary evidence also suggests that some Indians enj ...
    Related: american, american indians, documentary evidence, southern states, transition
  • Anorexia - 1,543 words
    Anorexia It would seem today that eating disorders are on the rise. While this may be true, the numbers may appear to grow only because more cases are being brought out into the open. One interpretation of an eating disorder is termed as a relationship between the person and food that appears abnormal. Anorexia Nervosa is one of the most prevalent eating disorder diseases. The word Anorexia itself means, "lack of appetite," and as for the definition of Anorexia, Anorexia is an all encompassing pursuit of thinness, occurring most often in adolescents and young adult women. This is accomplished by avoidance of eating by any means possible. The person affected by Anorexia has an absolutely terr ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, blood pressure, fashion industry, relief
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