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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: treatment programs

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  • Alcoholism - 2,059 words
    Alcoholism alcoholism Definitions and causal factors of alcoholism Alcoholism consists of a repetitive intake of alcoholic beverages to an extent that the drinker is harmed. The harm may be physical or mental; it may also be social or economic. Implicit in the conception of alcoholism as a disease is the idea that the person experiencing repeated or long-lasting injury from his drinking would alter his behaviour if he could. His failure to do so shows that he cannot help himself, that he has lost control over drinking. This conception incorporates the idea of addiction or dependence. Formal definitions of alcoholism vary according to the point of view of the definer. A simplistic, old-fashio ...
    Related: alcoholism, affective disorder, social factors, world war ii, relation
  • Alcoholism - 2,013 words
    ... times increased consumption of alcohol are cited in evidence. But these data invariably fail to take account of changes in availability or use of facilities, changes in admission or diagnostic policies, or changes in the source of beverages--for example, from unrecorded to recorded supplies. In the Soviet Union a change in the internal political situation with the death of Stalin resulted in a shift from official denial that any significant problem of alcoholism existed to an outcry that its prevalence was widespread and serious, though no statistics were provided. Treatment of alcoholism The various treatments of alcoholism may be classified as physiological, psychological, and social. ...
    Related: alcoholism, carbon dioxide, psychoactive drugs, alcoholics anonymous aa, therapy
  • Alcoholism - 1,162 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism is perhaps the most common form of drug abuse in America today. In 1995, in the United States 67% of all the population over the age of 12 reported drinking alcohol with in the previous year. Even more astounding, is the fact that nearly 50% reported drinking some type of alcoholic beverage with in the past month. Scientist report that the reason alcohol is so popular to drinkers is because it is pleasant, relaxing, and is considered a "social beverage." But what the drinkers often do not take in to consideration are the facts that alcohol dulls the brain and confuses physical reactions. Which leads to numerous injuries, accidents, and death. Roughly 1.3 million people ...
    Related: alcoholism, social situations, blood alcohol, america today, beverage
  • Alcoholism - 1,581 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism is a disease of epidemic proportions, affecting 9.3 to 10 million Americans, and many professionals believe the figures are closer to 20 million (Weddle and Wishon). Alcoholism is a "physiological or physiological dependence on alcohol characterized by the alcoholics inability to control the start or termination of his drinking"(Encyclopedia Britannica 210). It consists of frequent and recurring consumption of alcohol to an extent that causes continued harm to the drinker and leads to medical and social problems. Alcoholism, however, does not merely cause harm to the alcoholic, but to the entire family as well, affecting an estimated 28 million children in this country ...
    Related: alcoholism, high school, human beings, social problems, fail
  • Alcoholismnature Or Nuture - 1,570 words
    ... havior. Experiments have shown those males exhibit higher levels of aggression than do females. The aggressive behavior starts in the adolescent stages of life and may continue into adulthood. Where does the aggressiveness originate? Part of the explanation is that children who are sociable and spontaneous exhibit more aggressive behavior than those who do not. Surprisingly, common traits amongst these children are being first born, having a stable family life and a shy temperament. More current, up to date explanation state that aggression is learned response to frustration and by observing others who exhibit the same aggressive behavior. Males also are at greater risk for developing cr ...
    Related: environmental factors, drug abuse, sexual abuse, sitting, dependence
  • Boot Camps - 1,983 words
    ... e said, should be considered when designing any program for youth: Adolescents are fairness fanatics. Running any adolescent group care program is difficult because adolescents are very sensitive to anything they perceive as unfair, particularly anything that applies to the whole group. Adolescents reject imposed structure and assistance. Adolescents respond to encouragement, not punishment. Although they may change their behavior to avoid punishment, their attitudes and behaviors do not change in response to punishment (Andrews, 1990). The implications of these three factors are that youth will defend themselves against what they see as unfair, regardless of the motivation of the adults ...
    Related: boot, boot camps, juvenile court, support system, rehabilitation
  • Cancer - 1,487 words
    Cancer Introduction According to Mollet, cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Estimates for 1982 indicate that 430,000 Americans will have died of some form of cancer. If national trends continue, some fifty-three million Americans now alive will contract cancer sometime during their lifetime. Of this inverse number, approximately one-half will die of cancer despite a medical effort to cure and prevent cancer (300). Although 45 percent of the detected cases of serious cancer are curable, an increase of 5 percent in the last ten years, it is obvious that measures can be taken to increase the cure rate and also prevent onset of various cancers. Clark suggested that ...
    Related: american cancer, breast cancer, cancer, colon cancer, human cancer, lung cancer, prevent cancer
  • Deaf Culture And Alcoholism - 858 words
    Deaf Culture And Alcoholism Deaf Culture and Alcoholism Abstract Why is it so hard for the deaf to deal with admitting they are alcoholics or drug addicts which is an impediment for recovery? Why is it so hard for them to stay sober once they have achieved it for a few weeks or months? What do you think the main reasons are? Having worked with the deaf for over 30 years I will try to answer these questions and research other aspects of the deaf culture, their mode of communication and alcoholism. Although it may seem that communication is an aspect of every culture, two of the unique features are that there is not always a common language between parents and child, and there is no written fo ...
    Related: alcoholism, deaf, deaf community, deaf culture, deaf people
  • Delinquints - 980 words
    Delinquints Remember doing something mischievous or wrong when you were a kid and getting the label "delinquent" slapped on you ? Did you ever wonder what it meant ? That is what my topic for today is . . . juvenile delinquency. In this report I will: define juvenile delinquency, give the extent of juvenile delinquency, give some suggestions on what causes juvenile delinquency, and what is being done in various communities to deal with this growing problem. The legal term juvenile delinquent was established so that young lawbreakers could avoid the disgrace of being classified in legal records as criminals. Juvenile delinquency laws were designed to provide treatment, rather than punishment, ...
    Related: juvenile delinquents, work skills, delinquent behavior, guidance, police
  • Delusional Disorder Treatments - 716 words
    Delusional Disorder Treatments This disorder is characterized by the presence of non-bizarre delusions, which have persisted for a least one-month. Non-bizarre delusions typically are beliefs of something occurring in a persons life, which is not out of the realm of possibility. For example, the person may believe their significant other is cheating on them, that someone close to them is about to die, a friend is really a government agent, etc. All of these situations could be true or possible, but the person suffering from this disorder knows them not to be. People who have this disorder generally dont experience a marked impairment in their daily functioning in a social, occupational or ot ...
    Related: delusional, disorder, treatment programs, significant other, support groups
  • Diagnosis And Treatment Of Depression In The Elderly - 1,176 words
    Diagnosis and Treatment of Depression in the Elderly Mental disorders are becoming more prevalent in todays society as people add stress and pressure to their daily lives. The elderly population is not eliminated as a candidate for a disorder just because they may be retired. In fact, mental disorders affect 1 in 5 elderly people. One would think that with disorders being rather prevalent in this age group that there would be an abundance of treatment programs, but this is not the case. Because the diagnosis of an individuals mental state is subjective in nature, many troubled people go untreated regularly (summer 1998). Depression in the elderly population is a common occurrence, yet the di ...
    Related: diagnosis, elderly, elderly people, treating depression, treatment of depression, treatment programs
  • Drug Education - 1,093 words
    Drug Education Throughout history, America has been fighting against drug and alcohol abuse in teens and adults. Many ways companies and anti drug groups try to prevent drug and alcohol abuse is through education in school systems and out of school systems. They teach young students about drugs and alcohol before they risk being around them, and they teach older students about drugs while they are around in their daily lives. Are these education programs really necessary? Thats the question many people ask, and also the question Im going to attempt to answer. The government is usually the group that attempts to educate people about the causes and effects of drugs and alcohol through programs ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug and alcohol abuse, drug education, drug treatment, drug treatment programs, education program, education programs
  • Drug Legalization In America - 796 words
    Drug Legalization In America The issues surrounding drug legalization are complicated and sensitive. Each year drug use kills about 14,000 Americans and costs taxpayers approximately $70 billion. Drug-related illnesses and crime costs an estimated $67 billion per year. Drug use also influences worker productivity as seventy-one percent of all illicit drug users are eighteen and older and employed. Also impacted is public safety. A 1993, study from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration indicated that eighteen percent of 2,000 deaths from seven states had drugs, other than alcohol, in their systems when they died. Ironically, some citizens still support the idea of drug legalizati ...
    Related: america, drug enforcement, drug legalization, drug offenders, drug policy, drug treatment, illicit drug
  • Drugs And Crime - 1,492 words
    Drugs And Crime The link between drug use and crime is not a new one. For more than twenty years, both the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute of Justice have funded many studies to try to better understand the connection. One such study was done in Baltimore on heroin users. This study found high rates of criminality among users during periods of active drug use, and much lower rates during periods of nonuse (Ball et al. 1983, pp.119-142). A large number of people who abuse drugs come into contact with the criminal justice system when they are sent to jail or to other correctional facilities. The criminal justice system is flooded with substance abusers. The need for ...
    Related: crime, drug abuse, drug addicts, drug education, drug treatment, drug treatment programs, drugs
  • Drugs And Crime - 1,450 words
    ... t if they live with the general population, it is much harder to break away from old habits. The primary clinical staff is usually made up of former substance abusers that at one time were rehabilitated in therapeutic communities. The perspective of the treatment is that the problem is with the whole person and not the drug. The addiction is a symptom and not the core of the disorder. The primary goal is to change patterns of behavior, thinking, and feeling that predispose drug use (Inciardi et al. 1997, pp. 261-278). This returns to the general theory of crime and the argument that it is the opportunity that creates the problem. If you take away the opportunity to commit crimes by chang ...
    Related: crime, crime prevention, drug abuse, drug treatment, drugs, drugs and crime, war on drugs
  • Drugs And Their Effects On Business - 1,033 words
    ... nt raband, with or without the help of drug sniffing dogs. A more discrete way the companies search down drug users is by hiring undercover agents that entrap employees into using drugs. Catching more secretive drug users with drugs on them, because they a re clever or are just weekend users of drugs is more difficult. Companies have to physically search the employee's body which raises a lot of controversy. Urine testing gives rise to most discontent because of its humiliating way of getting a sample. B lood testing has its own inhereat problems because of the discomfort of a needle extracting blood. Because of the problems of conventional testing for controlled substances in the body's ...
    Related: drug problem, drug testing, drug treatment, drugs, long term effects, term effects
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - 1,768 words
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Preventable Birth Defect If women didnt drink anymore during pregnancy, there would never be another baby born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effect (McCuen 33). This is a very powerful statement. It is also a very simple cure for an alarmingly high birth defect that all women have the power to stop. Every year more than 40,000 American children are born with defects because their mother drank alcohol while pregnant (McCuen 34). That is 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births (McCuen 31). Many of these cases go undiagnosed It is also the number one cause of mental retardation in the United States, and one of the three leading causes of bir ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol dependency, alcohol syndrome, drink alcohol, fetal, fetal alcohol, fetal alcohol syndrome
  • Gambling And Crime Rate - 1,722 words
    Gambling And Crime Rate Many factors have influenced the rising crime rate, some being, increasing use of drugs, increasing population, and decreasing morals. America must find ways to decrease the crime rate legally. One question often going hand in hand with decreasing crime rate is would legalized gambling decrease the crime rate? During the late 1980's and early 1990's slow economic growth, cuts in federal funding, and growing public needs forced state and local governments to seek additional sources of revenue. Most states turned to lotteries, horse and dog racing, and most recently a growing number of states have resorted to casino gambling as a painless way to raise money. Case studie ...
    Related: casino gambling, crime, crime rate, gambling, legalized gambling, organized crime, pathological gambling
  • Heroin - 1,606 words
    HEROIN Abstract The use of heroin continues to climb in most areas. The number of varieties and sources of heroin available, combined with an increased domestic demand make the heroin market the fastest growing drug market reported. While there are indications of increased use of heroin among younger, suburban users, it is the cadre of older, inner-city heroin users that drive the heroin market (DEA 1996). Almost all areas report that the majority of heroin users are older drug users (over 30) who have been using for many years. However, many areas are reporting an increase in the number of new or younger users. HEROIN 3 Heroin, Its Effects and Treatment Heroin (AKA: smack, horse, mud, brown ...
    Related: heroin, heroin addiction, research institute, family medical, rock
  • Homelessness In Our Nation - 1,205 words
    ... the available shelters...and that the jobless are simply not motivated." (Hombs, 9) Thus, Congress left in place a number of measures which reduced the poor's access to housing, such as tightened eligibility standards for public housing, cuts to federal aid to poor children, (Foscarinis, par. 5-8) and cuts in subsidized low-rent housing. Still, today, our nation's government has not enacted any permanent solutions to homelessness. Our local, state or federal governments have not addressed the so desperately needed solutions for the fundamental cause of homelessness: 1) providing subsidies to make existing housing affordable, creating additional affordable housing through rehabilitation, ...
    Related: homelessness, federal government, staff training, affordable housing, maintaining
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