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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: transcendentalism

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  • Mockery Of Transcendentalism In The Fall Of The House Of Usher - 1,320 words
    Mockery Of Transcendentalism In The Fall Of The House Of Usher Edgar Allan Poes Mockery of Transcendentalism in The Fall of the House of Usher Throughout the development of our culture there have been a large number of literary movements. From existentialism to naturalism, humanism to surrealism, they all play an important role in the development of the literature we read today. One important movement during the nineteenth century is known as the transcendentalist movement. Transcendentalism is a form of idealism. In philosophy and literature, it is the belief in a higher reality than that found in sense experience or in a higher kind of knowledge than that achieved by human reason. Nearly a ...
    Related: fall of the house of usher, madeline usher, mockery, roderick usher, transcendentalism, usher
  • Ralph Emerson And Transcendentalism - 726 words
    Ralph Emerson And Transcendentalism The writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson dealt with three aspects of transcendental thought, which consisted of spiritual, philosophical, and literary content. In his time, Emerson imparted an influence upon his contemporaries and American literature. He explicitly encouraged other writers by his appeal for new American literature and new voices because America had failed to denounce European literature and produce its own literary scholarship. Emerson believed that literature should have a spiritual influence because of personal religious convictions. Also, he thought philosophy could espouse essential forms through which the mind itself quantified. Finally, E ...
    Related: emerson, ralph, ralph emerson, ralph waldo, ralph waldo emerson, transcendentalism, waldo emerson
  • Thoreau And Transcendentalism - 869 words
    Thoreau and Transcendentalism The beauty in the strength of mere words and the immense impact they have on the soul of man has been the inspiration to many of the greatest poets and writers. The ability to combine elegance with knowledge and thereupon affect the thoughts of others using only paper and pen has intrigued men for centuries. Each generation produces those who vehemently speak out against injustices by their written words. Henry David Thoreau proved to be the voice of his people and thus changed history by expressing the ideals he believed to be correct, though the majority of the people did not always understand these ideals. "I should have told them at once that I was a transce ...
    Related: david thoreau, henry david thoreau, henry thoreau, thoreau, transcendentalism
  • Transcendentalism - 549 words
    Transcendentalism Transcendentalism was an important movement in literature that occurred during the years of 1836-1860. Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau were the best-known transcendentalists. Ralph Waldo Emerson gave the German philosopher, Immanuel Kant, the credit for making Transcendentalism a familiar term. Kant had said that there were certain experiences that could be acquired only through intuitions of the mind. In Kants thoughts, transcendentalism was the knowledge or understanding a person gains intuitively. This, for the most part, sums up all of the transcendental writings that have been written to this day. Both Emerson and Thoreau were very similar in their thoughts ...
    Related: transcendentalism, time line, deep blue, ralph emerson, transcendental
  • Transcendentalism - 745 words
    Transcendentalism During the late 1800s and early 1900s, a new era was developing in American society. The United States was an idealistic nation with separate beliefs and lifestyles. One of the most intriguing lifestyles introduced during this time was transcendentalism. Many authors, such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathanial Hawthorne, Walt Whitman and Henry David Thoreau, developed this idea and tried to make people understand the meaning behind this new way of lfe. Through his extensive writings of books, essays and poetry, Thoreau gave the American public a deep insight to the new world of transcendentalism. While he was growing up, Thoreau rarely left his birth town of Concord. He felt th ...
    Related: transcendentalism, civil disobedience, ralph waldo emerson, american renaissance, fuller
  • Transcendentalism:ralph Waldo Emerson - 787 words
    Transcendentalism:Ralph Waldo Emerson Transcendentalism: Ralph Waldo Emerson Transcendentalism, in philosophy and nature, is the belief in a higher reality than found in sense experience or in a higher knowledge than achieved by human reason. Transcendentalism upholds the goodness of humanity, the glories of nature, and the importance of free individual expression. In addition, it is maintained that an awareness of reality, or a sense of truth, is reached through reasoning by intuition. Transcendentalism also holds that material objects do not have any real existence of their own. Rather, these objects are diffused aspects of God, the Over-Soul. In its most usage, transcendentalism refers to ...
    Related: emerson, ralph waldo, ralph waldo emerson, waldo, waldo emerson
  • Transcendentalism - 622 words
    Transcendentalism Transcendentalism is the belief that matters of ultimate reality transcend, or go beyond, human experience. Transcendentalist thinking began during the American Renaissance with writers like Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. However transcendental thinking did not begin with Thoreau and Emerson, but as Emerson called it, it is the very oldest of thoughts cast into the mold of these new times. Transcendentalism is based on the ancient philosophy of Idealism, which originates with Plato, a well-known philosopher from ancient Greece. Transcendentalism is an appropriate way of thinking for the period known as the American Renaissance because it puts one into a state ...
    Related: transcendentalism, political situation, ralph waldo emerson, waldo emerson, hawthorne
  • A Reaction To Uncle Toms Cabin - 1,386 words
    ... ill a young boy, his father sold Uncle Tom to the slave trader Mr. Haley. Growing up on a southern plantation, George naturally inherited the slave-owning tradition of his culture. When he found the beaten and dying Uncle Tom, however, his perception immediately changed and he vowed to "do what one man can to drive out this curse of slavery from my land! (p.455)" It was George who buried Uncle Tom, and he then returned home to free all of his own slaves. George was an admirable character because he demonstrated growth and integrity and illustrated that the inveterate rationalization of slave-owning was one that was not immutable. I also feel that the character of Mr. Wilson is one that c ...
    Related: cabin, toms, toms cabin, uncle, uncle tom's cabin, uncle toms cabin
  • American Philosophy - 626 words
    American Philosophy In all its forms, American philosophy emphasizes freedom and the supreme importance of the individual. Indeed, an examination of four major American writers shows these concepts in all four main schools of American thought-- Epicureanism, Transcendentalism, Pragmatism, and Protestantism. Epicureanism is the pursuit of pleasure in order to avoid pain. This philosophy is very American. One of the most famous American-Epicureans is Walt Whitman. Whitman is, perhaps, America's greatest poet. He was an ardent supporter of freedom and democracy. His poetry not only reflected his love and respect for America, but also the importance and the needs of the individual. Whitman's lov ...
    Related: american, american culture, american dream, american philosophy, american society, american writers, philosophy
  • American Studies - 1,845 words
    American Studies Understanding America November 11, 1999 Midterm Examination American Studies can be a variety of different meanings to a lot of different authors. They are all pretty much on the same note, but with different alterations. For me, I believe that it is to make connections between the past and how it will impact the future. American Studies has transformed overtime. Each individual has their own beliefs and feelings of what it really means. In Gene Wise's article he states how he is interested in how the field of American Studies has transformed overtime, what American Studies methodology is, and the types of questions that American Studies practitioners ask. I believe that the ...
    Related: african american, american, american culture, american history, american mind, american studies, early american
  • Analysis Of Pearl In Hawthornes The Scarlet Letter - 1,246 words
    Analysis Of Pearl In Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter Analysis of Pearl in Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter One of the most significant writers of the romantic period in American literature was Nathaniel Hawthorne. Hawthorne wrote stories that opposed the ideas of Transcendentalism. Since he had ancestors of Puritan belief, Hawthorne wrote many stories about Puritan New England. His most famous story is the Scarlet Letter. This novel tells of the punishment of a woman, Hester Prynne, who committed adultery and gave birth to Pearl. A minister of Boston, Arthur Dimmesdale, had an affair with Hester while believing that her husband, Roger Chillingworth, had died. However, Chillingworth did not die ...
    Related: nathaniel hawthorne, pearl, scarlet, scarlet letter, the scarlet letter
  • Blooming Trinity - 1,233 words
    Blooming Trinity English 1302.018 October 11, 2000 Blooming Trinity In the poem When Lilacs Last In The Dooryard Bloomd, by Walt Whitman, three important symbols are introduced. These symbols of a star, the lilac, and a bird exhibit Whitmans transcendentalism and serve as an allusion to Abraham Lincolns life and death. Whitmans poetry, through these symbols, opens a window to the prevailing social attitudes, moral beliefs, and cultural disposition of his time through his allusions to President Lincoln. To understand Whitmans poetry one must first know something about the poet himself. Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in Long Island New York. Whitman disliked the idea of becoming a carpe ...
    Related: trinity, abraham lincoln, langston hughes, ralph waldo, representing
  • Born In 1817, In Concord, Henry David Thoreau Became One Of The Greatest Writers Among The American Renaissance Thoreau Based - 537 words
    Born in 1817, in Concord, Henry David Thoreau became one of the greatest writers among the American Renaissance. Thoreau based his whole philosophy on the fact that man needed to get rid of material things in order to be an individual. An exquisitely educated man, Thoreau went to Harvard, which placed heavy emphasis on the classics. Thoreau studied a curriculum that included grammar and composition, mathematics, English, history, and various philosophies. He also spoke fluently in Italian, French, German, and Spanish. After his graduation in 1837, Thoreau became a teacher. He and his brother John, however, closed the school in 1841, for Thoreau knew writing was his passion. He kept a journal ...
    Related: american, american renaissance, david, david thoreau, henry david, henry david thoreau, renaissance
  • Born In Boston In 1809, Edgar Poe Was Destined To Lead A Rather Somber And Brief Life, Most Of It - 1,175 words
    ... se ideas, along with those of Plato, the Neoplatonists, Asian mystics, and SWEDENBORG, strongly influenced his philosophy. Returning home (1835), he settled in Concord, Mass., which he, Margaret FULLER, THOREAU, and others made a center of TRANSCENDENTALISM. He stated the movement's main principles in Nature (1836), stressing the mystical unity of nature. A noted lecturer, Emerson called for American intellectual independence from Europe in his Phi Beta Kappa address at Harvard ("The American Scholar," 1837 [.txt-only version]). In an address at the Harvard divinity school (1838), he asserted that redemption could be found only in one's own soul and intuition. Emerson developed transcend ...
    Related: boston, edgar, general public, waldo emerson, poets
  • Bryant Vs Dickinson - 1,367 words
    Bryant Vs Dickinson Emily Dickinson presents death in the poem "Because I Could Not Stop for Death" through the use of personification and the use of extended metaphor. William Cullen Bryant presents death through the use of the analogies in the poem "Thanatopsis." Although each poet presents death differently, the meanings are similar. In "Thanatopsis, " Bryant influences the reader to accept death as all living things' fate. Bryant explains death by nature's laws and the fact that nature's creatures must abide by these laws. In lines 26-28, Bryant explains how an individual must abide by these laws and surrender to the earth that nourished the living. "To be a brother to the insensible roc ...
    Related: bryant, cullen bryant, dickinson, emily dickinson, william cullen bryant
  • Emersonian Individualism - 1,491 words
    Emersonian Individualism Emerson's "transcendentalism" is essentially a romantic individualism, a philosophy of life for a new people who had overthrown their colonial governors and set about conquering a new continent by their own lights. Though Emerson is not a technical philosopher, the tendency of his thought is toward idealist metaphysics in which soul and intuition, or inspiration, are central. The new American experiment needed every idea within its reach. Taking a practical and democratic, yet poetic interest in all of nature and in individuals of every walk of life, Emerson stresses the potential for genius and creativity in all people. It is a source of creative insight within whic ...
    Related: emersonian, individualism, century europe, common sense, philosophy
  • Emersons Selfreliance - 483 words
    Emerson's Self-Reliance Ralph Emerson wrote many journals and essays dealing with the subject of transcendentalism. One of his most famous works is the essay Self-Reliance. In Self-Reliance, Emerson hit on the idea that the individual should be completely reliant on God, and that every person has been put into their certain life and position by God and that the person needs to trust themselves. He said that God has put the power to handle things, think, and act into each individual and that the individual needs to trust what God has put inside them to do things with their lives. The idea is almost that of predestination, except for the fact that we have the choice of which road to take. Pred ...
    Related: ralph emerson, great ideas, famous works, divine providence, advancing
  • Emily Dickinson - 1,122 words
    Emily Dickinson Emily Dickinson was raised in a traditional New England home in the mid 1800's. Her father along with the rest of the family had become Christians and she alone decided to rebel against that and reject the Church. She like many of her contemporaries had rejected the traditional views in life and adopted the new transcendental outlook. Massachusetts, the state where Emily was born and raised in, before the transcendental period was the epicenter of religious practice. Founded by the puritans, the feeling of the avenging had never left the people. After all of the "Great Awakenings" and religious revivals the people of New England began to question the old ways. What used to be ...
    Related: dickinson, emily, emily dickinson, life after death, helen hunt
  • Emily Dickinson - 1,122 words
    Emily Dickinson Emily Dickinson was raised in a traditional New England home in the mid 1800's. Her father along with the rest of the family had become Christians and she alone decided to rebel against that and reject the Church. She like many of her contemporaries had rejected the traditional views in life and adopted the new transcendental outlook. Massachusetts, the state where Emily was born and raised in, before the transcendental period was the epicenter of religious practice. Founded by the puritans, the feeling of the avenging had never left the people. After all of the "Great Awakenings" and religious revivals the people of New England began to question the old ways. What used to be ...
    Related: dickinson, emily, emily dickinson, new england, helen hunt
  • Emily Dickinsons Death Poems - 1,073 words
    Emily Dickinson's Death Poems Emily Dickinson's world was her father's home and garden in a small New England town. She lived most of her life within this private world. Her romantic visions and emotional intensity kept her from making all but a few friends. Because of this life of solitude, she was able to focus on her world more sharply than other authors of her time were. Her poems, carefully tied in packets, were discovered only after she had died. They reveal an unusual awareness of herself and her world, a shy but determined mind. Every poem was like a tiny micro-chasm that testified to Dickinson's life as a recluse. Dickinson's lack of rhyme and regular meter and her use of ellipsis a ...
    Related: emily, emily dickinson, poems, american poetry, new england
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