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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: tragedy

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  • According To Aristotle, A Tragedy Is A Form Of Theater That Replicates A Solemn Action With The Intention Of Stirring Dread A - 1,073 words
    According to Aristotle, a tragedy is a form of theater that replicates a solemn action with the intention of stirring dread and sympathy in the viewer. Sophocles Antigone and Arthur Millers All My Sons both fit into this category. Both stories consist of a tragic hero, Creon and Joe Keller in this instance. According to Aristotles Poetics, a tragic hero is someone not all good or all bad, and whose downfall is caused by a tragic flaw or "hamartia". Later the hero comes to a realization of their flaw, which usually comes too late for them to redeem themselves. Creon and Keller are both tragic heroes that fit into Aristotles model, whose downfall is caused by greed, excessive pride and a belat ...
    Related: dread, intention, solemn, theater, tragedy
  • All American Tragedy - 1,351 words
    All American Tragedy Without a doubt, most Americans can distinctly draw a picture in their minds of John Wilkes Booth ... The Civil War had ended five days previously with the surrender of General Lee. President Lincoln and the first lady had decided to take a night off and see a stage play at the Ford's Theatre. An obviously enraged young actor preceded into the stage box a kills Lincoln, and then exits the theatre by jumping on to the stage and escaping through the back where a horse had been waiting. Booth tried to escape for good, but within two weeks he was killed in a violent ordeal near Bowling Green, VA. From the moment the shot rang out in that theatre, the American people knew who ...
    Related: american, american history, american people, tragedy, president lincoln
  • An American Tragedy - 1,103 words
    An American Tragedy An American Tragedy Where were you November 22, 1963? Any and every American old enough to mourn, to feel sorrow, remembers where they were and what they were doing when they received the news that President John F. Kennedy had been murdered. The event had an effect on the entire nation. Men and women, Democrats and Republicans, adults and children mourned the loss of their fallen leader. President Johnson, the Warren Commission, and every fascinated watcher-on in the world would closely scrutinize that day and the following events. The facts of the day are still hotly contested. Politicians have made their careers on the case. Conspiracy theorists have had a field day wr ...
    Related: american, american government, american people, tragedy, texas governor
  • Analysis Of Veiwpoints On Tragedy - 859 words
    Analysis Of Veiwpoints On Tragedy The question of what defines tragedy has been an issue addressed by several different literary minds since the day of Aristotle, the first person to define tragedy. When Aristotle first defined tragedy he believed tragedy was something reserved for a person of noble stature. He said this person was eventually brought down by a tragic flaw, hence the term tragedy. Robert Silverberg agrees with Aristotle's views on tragedy, but other authors don't accept Aristotle's view so easily. Arthur Miller for example Believes any common man can be tragic, not just the nobility. And Richard Sewall, takes a view that's a bit different all together. Aristotle was, as far a ...
    Related: tragedy, arthur miller, good and evil, first person, oppressive
  • Aristotle On Tragedy - 1,046 words
    Aristotle on Tragedy Aristotle on Tragedy The Nature of Tragedy: In the century after Sophocles, the philosopher Aristotle analyzed tragedy. His definition: Tragedy then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; in language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament, the several kinds being found in separate parts of the play; in the form of action, not of narrative; through pity and fear effecting the proper purgation of these emotions. Aristotle identified six basic elements: (1) plot; (2) character; (3) diction (the choice of style, imagery, etc.); (4) thought (the character's thoughts and the author's meaning); (5) spectacle (all the visual ...
    Related: aristotle, tragedy, tragic hero, basic elements, imitation
  • Aristotles Tragedy - 1,488 words
    Aristotle`s Tragedy Defining a Tragedy Greek philosopher Aristotle proposes components of an ideal tragedy in his work, Tragedy and the Emotions of Pity and Fear. According to Aristotle, there are six components of a great tragedy: plot, character, thought, verbal expression, song, and visual adornment. He dissects these components in great detail and provides standards for all of them. In his play Bacchae, Euripides resembles much of Aristotles components of an ideal tragedy. Euripides has only few deviations from the Aristotelian tragedy. To Aristotle, a tragedy is defined as an imitation of action and life, not of an imitation of men. Therefore, he places higher emphasis the role of plot ...
    Related: greek tragedy, tragedy, literary device, divine intervention, euripides
  • Hamlet Tragedy - 1,017 words
    Hamlet Tragedy William Shakespeare, the greatest playwright of the English language, wrote a total of 37 plays in his lifetime, all of which can be categorized under tragedy, comedy, or history. The Tragedy of Hamlet, Shakespeares most popular and greatest tragedy, displays his genius as a playwright, as literary critics and academic commentators have found an unusual number of themes and literary techniques present in Hamlet. Hamlet concerns the murder of the king of Denmark and the murdered kings sons quest for revenge. Its main character, Hamlet, possesses a tragic flaw which obstructs his desire for revenge and ultimately brings about his death. This tragic flaw makes him a tragic hero, ...
    Related: hamlet, tragedy, royal court, english language, sorrow
  • Hamlet Tragedy - 804 words
    Hamlet Tragedy To many people William Shakespeare's Hamlet is the most vivid and descriptive tragedy that he has ever written. In all classic tragedies the hero suffers, and usually dies at the end. Othello stabs himself, Romeo and Juliet commit suicide, Brutis falls on his sword, and like them, Hamlet dies by getting cut with a poison tipped sword. But that is not the only element that is needed to consider a play a tragedy. Many times a hero does not even need to die. There are more ingredients needed to label a play a tragedy than just a hero and a sad ending. If every action is controlled by a hero's destiny, then the hero's death can not be avoided, and in a tragedy most deaths are fore ...
    Related: claudius hamlet, hamlet, tragedy, william shakespeare, romeo and juliet
  • Hamlet Tragedy - 1,665 words
    Hamlet Tragedy Hamlet (c. 1600) is perhaps the most famous of all the tragedies created by William Shakespeare. The main character Hamlet -- may be the most complex and controversial character any playwright has ever placed onstage. Hamlets erratic behavior poses a question: is he being rational in his acts and sacrificing himself for the "greater good" or is he simply mad? How and why does Hamlet move from one state of mind to the other? What significance does this have for the play? Throughout the play Hamlet goes through several different stages of life, constantly being in a tortured mental state, caught between love, grief, and vengeance. His different states of mind are the result of ...
    Related: claudius hamlet, hamlet, tragedy, tragedy hamlet, higher power
  • Hamlet: Tragedy In Hamlet - 1,947 words
    Hamlet: Tragedy in Hamlet The tradition of literature includes many genres. One of the oldest and most important of these genres is tragedy; one of the foremost Elizabethan tragedies in the canon of English literature is Hamlet by William Shakespeare and one of the earliest critics of tragedy is Aristotle. One way to measure Shakespeare's work is to appraise it using the methods of classical critics and thereby to see how if it would have retained its meaning. Hamlet is one of the most recognizable and most often quoted tragedies in the all of English literature. Aristotle, is concerned with the proper presentation of tragic plays and poetry. Aristotle defines tragedy as: "...a representatio ...
    Related: greek tragedy, hamlet, hamlet shakespeare, tragedy, samuel johnson
  • Hamlet: Tragedy In Hamlet - 1,947 words
    Hamlet: Tragedy in Hamlet The tradition of literature includes many genres. One of the oldest and most important of these genres is tragedy; one of the foremost Elizabethan tragedies in the canon of English literature is Hamlet by William Shakespeare and one of the earliest critics of tragedy is Aristotle. One way to measure Shakespeare's work is to appraise it using the methods of classical critics and thereby to see how if it would have retained its meaning. Hamlet is one of the most recognizable and most often quoted tragedies in the all of English literature. Aristotle, is concerned with the proper presentation of tragic plays and poetry. Aristotle defines tragedy as: "...a representatio ...
    Related: greek tragedy, hamlet, hamlet shakespeare, tragedy, historical context
  • Hamlets Tragedy - 480 words
    Hamlet's Tragedy Hamlet's tragedy is a tragedy of failure-the failure of a man placed in critical circumstances to deal successfully with those circumstances. In some ways, Hamlet reminds us of Brutus in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. Hamlet and Brutus are both good men who live in trying times; both are intellectual, even philosophical; both men want to do the right thing; both men intellectualize over what the right thing is; neither man yields to passion. But here the comparison ends, for though both Brutus and Hamlet reflect at length over the need to act, Brutus is able immediately to act while Hamlet is not. Hamlet is stuck thinking too precisely on th' event-. Hamlet's father, the king ...
    Related: tragedy, tragedy hamlet, julius caesar, right thing, everlasting
  • Hamlets Tragedy - 480 words
    Hamlet's Tragedy Hamlet's tragedy is a tragedy of failure-the failure of a man placed in critical circumstances to deal successfully with those circumstances. In some ways, Hamlet reminds us of Brutus in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. Hamlet and Brutus are both good men who live in trying times; both are intellectual, even philosophical; both men want to do the right thing; both men intellectualize over what the right thing is; neither man yields to passion. But here the comparison ends, for though both Brutus and Hamlet reflect at length over the need to act, Brutus is able immediately to act while Hamlet is not. Hamlet is stuck thinking too precisely on th' event-. Hamlet's father, the king ...
    Related: tragedy, tragedy hamlet, julius caesar, right thing, denmark
  • I Found It Very Difficult To View This Narrative As A Tragedy, Possibly Due To My - 290 words
    I found it very difficult to view this narrative as a tragedy, possibly due to my view that Medea was the Heroine and main character rather than Jason. From Jasons point of view it was truly a tragedy that his bride, children and successors were taken from him. However, I dont believe that this was a tragedy for Medea, but rather a personal story of an individual living her own will. Circumstances forced her to make a decision on her future, vowing to revenge her broken heart. Betrayed by her lover, Medea experienced feelings of hurt, anger and a desire for revenge. Once her mind was made up to strike back upon her assailant, all the details of her plan just fell into place. She was able to ...
    Related: narrative, point of view, personal story, main character, multiple
  • In The Tragedy Of King Lear, King Lear Is Quite Cruel To His Loving Daughter, Cordelia Cordelia Expresses Her True Love For H - 277 words
    In The Tragedy of King Lear, King Lear is quite cruel to his loving daughter, Cordelia. Cordelia expresses her true love for her father, and Lear disowns her. Lear makes his three daughters, Cordelia, Regan, and Goneril, tell him how great of a father and king he is, in order to own and rule a part on England. Regan and Goneril lie to him, while Cordelia expresses her true love. She explains to Lear that her love cannot fit into words; it is too great. Lear becomes outraged, and sends her away. He tells Goneril and Regan that he will divide his kingdom of England into half, and each one can one a part of it, as long has he gets 100 horsemen to parade around with him. Eagerly, they agree. Dur ...
    Related: cordelia, cruel, expresses, king lear, lear, loving, tragedy
  • Julius Caesar Tragedy - 1,265 words
    Julius Caesar Tragedy 1.) The great philosopher Aristotle makes the distinction between comedy and tragedy. Aristotle defines tragedy as a tragic character falling from a high place in society due to a flaw they possess and provides an insight into human existence. He defines comedy as any story that begins in adversity and ends in optimism. Shakespeare offers his own six elements to a tragedy; a tragic hero, conflicts (internal and external), humor, the supernatural, revenge, and chance happenings or bad luck. The tragic hero is clearly Brutus who seals his own fate through his character flaw, which is being a stoic. Conflicts are present in great numbers throughout this story both internal ...
    Related: caesar, comedy and tragedy, julius, julius caesar, tragedy
  • Lady Macbeth In The Tragedy Of Macbeth The Iron Butterfly - 859 words
    Lady Macbeth in The Tragedy of Macbeth; the "Iron Butterfly" In William Shakespeare's, The Tragedy of Macbeth, Lady Macbeth is the dominator of the play. Lady Macbeth's character is not as eclectic as her husband's but it is just as dramatic. Lady Macbeth has a rich and fascinating combination of qualities. She is not a monster without feeling; her husband adores her, for example, "Be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck," (III, ii, 45). Macbeth also refers to Lady Macbeth as his dear partner. Lady Macbeth is horrified by blood and during her sleepwalking soliloquy she refers to her little hand suggesting a delicate nature and stature by uttering this: "All the perfumes / of Arabia will ...
    Related: butterfly, iron, lady macbeth, macbeth, tragedy
  • Macbeth And Hamlet Tragedy - 509 words
    Macbeth And Hamlet Tragedy The Tragedies of Macbeth and Hamlet Macbeth is a Shakespearean tale about a confused Scottish noble that does not know how to utilize his ambition. He succumbs to temptation, which is partly supplied by his wife, and he kills to get the position of king. Hamlet, on the other hand, is another Shakespearean masterpiece that deals with a torn prince of Denmark that has to deal with the untimely death of his father. Hamlet and Macbeth are similar in many ways, and reveal many sides of the human heart through their dynamically dramatic plots. Both of these works deal with great inner conflict in the main character. Macbeth cannot decide whether or not to kill Duncan, wh ...
    Related: hamlet, king hamlet, lady macbeth, macbeth, tragedy
  • Macbeth Tragedy - 667 words
    Macbeth Tragedy In order for a story to be considered a tragedy, it has to fit a certain description. The Greek playwright Aristotle was the first to define a tragedy. He said it was a story in which the protagonist (tragic hero) goes from fortunate to unfortunate circumstances because if his tragic flaw and fate working together. Macbeth fits these characteristics, and is a tragedy. In this play, the tragic hero is Macbeth. His tragic flaw is his weak morals, and his ability to be easily persuaded. These two things help to bring him down in many respects. First of all, he killed Duncan. Now, he would not have killed Duncan if his wife had not persuaded him. But, because of his tragic flaw, ...
    Related: lady macbeth, macbeth, tragedy, tragic hero, downfall
  • Marilyn Monroe: An Allamerican Sex Goddess Or Hollywood Tragedy - 1,152 words
    Marilyn Monroe: An All-American Sex Goddess Or Hollywood Tragedy? Marilyn Monroe: An All-American Sex Goddess or Hollywood Tragedy? When someone mentions Marilyn Monroe, one usually thinks off the seductive all-American sex goddess who captured the world with her woman-childlike charm. Yet not many know her as the illegitimate child who endured a childhood of poverty and misery, sexual abuse, and years in foster home and orphanages. Most people don't realize that her disrupted loveless childhood may been the main reason to her early death. Norma Jeane Baker's father, Edward Mortenson, had deserted her mother, Gladys Baker ne Monroe, before she was born on June, 1 1926, in the charity ward of ...
    Related: goddess, hollywood, marilyn, marilyn monroe, tragedy
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