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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: traffic control

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  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,375 words
    Air Traffic Strike The Pressures of PATCO: Strikes and Stress in the 1980s By Rebecca Pels -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- Note on electronic format: you can access any citation by clicking on the note number. In order to leave citations and return to the main text of the document, press the Back key on your viewer. -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- On August 3, 1981 almost 13,000 air traffic controllers went on strike after months of negotiations with the federal government. During the contract talks, Robert Poli, president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Association (PATCO), explained the union's th ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, aviation safety
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,516 words
    ... emands rested upon prevailing norms of workers' interests and power. Since World War II, labor leaders have placed a disproportionate amount of emphasis on economic gains, and the collective bargaining process has gravitated toward these areas. At the same time, management has carefully guarded its prerogatives from the bargaining process.24 In this context, it seems likely that in envisioning a future strike, controllers felt that wages could and should be one aspect of it. Yet wages were not the decisive factor for most, and their other demands, derived from a far more vital, ideological interest than economic gains, evoked their passionate and surprisingly unified response. Individual ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, worlds apart
  • Are Airplanes Safe - 1,143 words
    Are Airplanes Safe? Are Airplanes Safe? TWA Flight 800, EgyptAir Flight 990, and Alaska Air Flight 461 and countless other flight numbers from the past decade all have one major thing in common with each other. All three are commercial airline flights that have gone down with no survivors, and all of these flights have happened in the past five years. All three of these mentioned accidents got extensive publicity in the few weeks after they occurred, the reason for this was because of the great number of people that were killed on each flight. On TWA Flight 800, all 212 passengers were killed. On EgyptAir Flight 990, all 167 people lost their lives; and all 88 passengers aboard Alaska Air Fl ...
    Related: different forms, department of transportation, customer service, mechanical, aboard
  • Aviationaerospace Psychology - 1,361 words
    Aviation/Aerospace Psychology Eastern Flight 401 What really happened! By For Aviation/Aerospace Psychology MAS 634 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Extended Campus Fort Rucker, Alabama Resident Center March 2000 The following National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) abstract indicates only one of the many reasons for the actual crash. Date: December 29, 1972 Type: Lockheed L-1011 Registration: N310EA Operator: Eastern Airlines Where: Miami, FL Report No. NTSB-AAR-73-14 Report Date: June 14, 1973 Pages: 45 An Eastern Air Lines Lockheed L-1011 crashed at 2342 eastern standard time, December 29, 1972, 18.7 miles west-northwest of Miami International Airport, Miami, Florida. The aircraft ...
    Related: psychology, international airport, health problems, miami florida, faulty
  • Aviationaerospace Psychology - 1,450 words
    ... aircraft. Additionally, from reading the Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) transcripts that the flight crew was also lacking in what is considered general operator knowledge. Specifically there was confusion between the flight crew on how to change and test the gear indicator light, and how to view the mechanical nose gear indicator in the nose compartment. The flight crew also displayed a lack of awareness of the actual aircraft's position and had become complacent in their duties by relying on the autopilot to fly the aircraft. This lack of awareness is displayed in the transcript when the CAM-2 microphone recorded "We did something to the altitude" CAM-1 recorded "What?" CAM-2 recorded "W ...
    Related: psychology, international airport, national transportation safety board, traffic control, landing
  • Challenges Facing Urban Transport In Asia Construction - 1,552 words
    - Challenges Facing Urban Transport In Asia - Construction CHALLENGES FACING URBAN TRANSPORT IN ASIA Abstract- One of the greatest challenges facing the new millennium is to effect a well integrated and environmentally acceptable solution for urban transportation. In spite of many decades of studies, involving research and experiments, success has often been elusive and more importantly, there is still a lack of consensus of what constitutes an acceptable integrated transport policy within the urban fabric The paper analyses the global trend towards urbanisation and demonstrates that while there are megacites throughout the world,there is a concentration of them in the Asian region and that ...
    Related: asia, challenges facing, construction, facing, transport, urban, urban areas
  • Challenges Facing Urban Transport In Asia Construction - 1,594 words
    ... employment and services so as to shorten journeys, public transport availability effectiveness and fares, and road pricing. 1.Short term Measures : a. Pricing and Finance : In urbanized areas with substantial amount of congestion caused by motorization, road pricing offers the best solution since it promotes both the purposes; it encourages that the socially efficient number of trips be undertaken and raises revenue to finance road ways and transport expansion to the efficient level. More ever, road pricing can contribute to viable loan financing and voluntary participation of the private sector. Some supplements to other basic taxes which may be used are petrol tax and parking fees, w ...
    Related: asia, challenges facing, construction, facing, transport, urban, urban development
  • Collision Aviodance - 1,336 words
    Collision Aviodance Collision Avoidance: ADS-B or TCAS March 7, 2000 INTRODUCTION Background Collision avoidance is something that has been a problem in aviation for a long time. Most of the flights conducted today rely on the see and avoid concept and ground radar. Both of which have their flaws. The FAA predicts that mid-air collisions will increase by 300% over the next 20 years due to the increase in flights being flown by all areas of the aviation community (Kraus xiv). Civil aircraft have had onboard protection from midair collisions only since 1990 and general aviation aircraft are not required to have any collision avoidance technology onboard(www.cassd.org 1). In order to effectivel ...
    Related: collision, surface area, introduction background, traffic control, aircraft
  • Controlled Airspace In The United States - 749 words
    Controlled Airspace In The United States The value of controlled airspace in the United States is for the safety of all commercial and general aviation flights. Utter chaos reigns in skies without controlled airspace. With thousands of airplanes in the skies every day carrying hundred of thousand of people the necessity of a means of controlling them becomes relevant. The (FAA) Federal Aviation Administration is the regulative department of the United States Government that controls the skies in the U.S. The FAA divided the airspace into different categories, all of which have different regulations and limits on both horizontal and vertical airspace restrictions. They are broken down into ba ...
    Related: states government, united states government, speed limit, aviation administration, clearance
  • Crew Resource Managament - 1,149 words
    ... s case studies published by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) revealing CRM-related causes of accidents. One such example is the American Airlines Crew Resource Management 6 flight 965, a Boeing 757 that crashed into terrain while making an approach into a Columbian airport in 1995. The crew made several mistakes, including exhibiting get-there-it is, a condition in which the crew is determined to perform an act, whether it is departure or landing, due to fatigue or some other outside motivation. This lapse in judgment caused the death of all but four of the 163 passengers and crew on board. This lead to compounding problems, such as missed and erroneous procedures. There w ...
    Related: crew, resource, resource management, aviation safety, military aviation
  • Garret Augustus Morgan Was Born On March 4, 1877 He Was The Seventh Of Eleven Children Born To The Morgan Family In Paris, Ke - 496 words
    Garret Augustus Morgan was born on March 4, 1877. He was the seventh of eleven children born to the Morgan family in Paris, Kentucky. As a young boy Morgan was very creative. Morgan taught himself after he left school. After he dropped out of fifth grade, he left home at the age of fourteen for Cleveland. Despite no formal education Morgan became a very successful man. He has created many inventions that have improved the lives of everyone. His inventions range from hair products, to gas masks, to his most famous-the traffic light. When Morgan moved to Cleveland he developed and patented the first chemical hair straitner. This provided Mr. Morgan with financial comfort and stability. As a re ...
    Related: augustus, eleven, garret, morgan, seventh
  • History Of English Language - 1,077 words
    History Of English Language History of English Language As I stated previously in my Abstract, the title of my research paper is "History of the English language". In this paper I will discuss where and how the English language originated and how it has spread to become one of the most spoken languages in the world. Before I started my research on my topic of choice, my original hypothesis was that the English language was started by a whole assortment of Germanic tribes invading England thousands of years ago. This ultimately became the goal of my paper, to see if Germanic tribes started the English language, or if it was started from some other tribes that I was not aware of. The history o ...
    Related: early history, english language, history, history of the english language, middle english, modern english, old english
  • Human Factors And The Weekend Pilot - 234 words
    Human Factors And The Weekend Pilot If any area of aviation could benefit from realistic and workable human factors solutions, its the area of general aviation (GA) and the weekend pilot. Many of the aircraft flow by the weekend pilot are older and do not have the benefits of modern flight deck design. However, the demands on these pilots, as far as maintaining radio contact with air traffic control and operating their aircraft in crowded airspace has increased. Air traffic control is generally speaking, less tolerant of the weekend pilot, yet this type of GA pilot is expected to perform as expeditiously as the pilot who flies for a living. Human factors research and design needs to be appli ...
    Related: pilot, weekend, information processing, general aviation, radio
  • Information Terrorism - 938 words
    Information Terrorism The introduction of the computer has created a new type of terrorism known as informational terrorism, which presents a threat, equal to or greater than physical terrorism. E-mail bombs and attacks on internet servers are the lowest forms of informational terrorism in terms of destruction. Higher forms of informational warfare include using the internet as a catalyst to produce physical terrorism on a higher scale. "The national security establishment is concerned with a new form of conflict; informational warfare." (Devost, 1) The Department of Defense definition of terrorism is "the calculated use of violence or the threat of violence to inculcate fear; intended to co ...
    Related: information systems, information technology, terrorism, modern society, drug problem
  • Labor Issues - 2,148 words
    Labor Issues Labor Unions: Aging Dinosaur or Sleeping Giant? The Labor Movement and Unionism Background and Brief History Higher wages! Shorter workdays! Better working conditions! These famous words echoed throughout the United States beginning in 1790 with the skilled craftsmen (Dessler, 1997, p. 544). For the last two-hundred years, workers of all trades have been fighting for their rights and seeking methods of improving their living standards, working conditions, and job security (Boone, 1996,p.287). As time went by, these individuals came to the conclusion that if they work together collectively, they would grow stronger to get responses to their demands. This inspired into what we kno ...
    Related: american labor, department of labor, labor, labor force, labor issues, labor movement, labor practices
  • Mike Porter Researches - 4,691 words
    Mike Porter Researches Michael Porter On How To Marry Strategy & Operational Effectiveness The Harvard management guru argues that operations & strategy must fit to create a sustainable competitive advantage. For almost two decades, managers have been learning to play by a new set of rules. Companies must be flexible to respond rapidly to competitive and market changes. They must benchmark continuously to achieve best practice. They must outsource aggressively to gain efficiencies. . . Positioning -- once the heart of strategy -- is rejected as too static for today's dynamic markets and changing technologies. According to the new dogma, rivals can quickly copy any market position, and compet ...
    Related: michael porter, mike, porter, researches, technological progress
  • Society And It - 878 words
    Society And IT Discuss the Threats and Causes of Failure, and Steps Taken to Minimise it. In todays world it is impossible to run a large organisation without the aid of computers. Businesses hold massive amounts of important data, hospitals hold large amounts of confidential patient information and large scientific research projects hold important codes, formulae, and equations. The bottom line is that loss or corruption of this information is sure to result in bankruptcy, a substantial loss of customers, and even world-wide financial meltdown. A dependency on technology is impossible to avoid even with its fatal consequences. Companies face the worry of information lost through hacking, v ...
    Related: world wide, computer viruses, cornell university, viruses, stephen
  • Speed Limits - 470 words
    Speed Limits Imagine driving on I-75 as cars race by you at a blink of an eye. You are driving 60 miles per hour, the speed limit; they must be doing 100 miles per hour or more. This is not an illusion; this is the reality of driving on a highway. Believe it, it happens everyday. Cars race down the road at uncontrollable speeds that cause tickets, accidents, and sadly death. Speed limits are a must for traffic control, for safety in neighborhoods and for avoidance of collisions. Traffic control establishes a set of rules and regulations that people rely on to help avoid collisions and other hazards. With almost 160 million motorists and 3.8 million miles of public roads in the United States, ...
    Related: speed limit, speed limits, legal issues, daily life, injury
  • Terrorist Bombs In The Us - 1,243 words
    ... partment in order to gain some insight into what is going on with terrorism in our city and how it is handled. After making several phone calls, I was finally able to reach the terrorism division of the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD). But to my disappointment, the officer on the other line told me that he was not able to discuss any of the information they had concerning terrorism and their tactics with the general public. Because of this reason, I had to settle for a detective in the police department. I first asked Detective John Doe what position he held in the police department, what he did, and how long he had been working at it. I learned that John is a detective in the Los A ...
    Related: terrorist, social status, airport security, general public, vandalism
  • The Cause And Effect Of Human Error In Air Safety - 889 words
    The Cause And Effect Of Human Error In Air Safety BACKGROUND PAPER ON THE CAUSE AND EFFECT OF HUMAN ERROR IN AIR SAFETY 1. On March 27 1977, an impatient pilot of a Boeing 747 failed to follow proper procedure and commenced a takeoff roll that collided with another B747; he killed 583 people. This incident, that took place in the Canary Islands, remains the worlds deadliest air disaster (www:AirD). It also is a driving force to understand the ramifications of blatant human error and attempt to foresee and or prevent these types of accidents from happening in the future. The comprehensive study of the human factor, in the history of air mishaps, can help reduce the loss of life and resources ...
    Related: aviation safety, cause and effect, error, human error, human factor, ultimate cause
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