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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: trade union

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  • American Women During Wwii - 1,832 words
    American Women During Wwii American Women During World War II. America's entry into World War II posed opportunities for American women domestically, yet paradoxically heightened fears in the polity about the exact role that women should adopt during wartime. A central issue that dominated women's lives during this period was how to combine the private sphere of the home, with the new demands of the war economy in the public sphere. Women made significant gains in the military, the war economy and in some cases, in terms of political influence. Yet these gains were misleading for policy makers utilised the female workforce for short-term gains during war, with a long-term goal of seeing wome ...
    Related: american, american society, american women, black women, employed women, married women, men and women
  • Chile Political Parties And Organizations - 1,401 words
    ... ition parties to propose far-reaching amendments to the constitution. The National Renewal party, however, could not impose its own party president, having to concede the presidential candidacy of the right to the UDI's Bchi. After the 1989 congressional race, the National Renewal party emerged as the dominant party of the right, benefiting strongly from the electoral law and electing six senators and twenty-nine deputies. Its strength in the Senate meant that the Aylwin government had to compromise with the National Renewal party to gain support for key legislative and constitutional measures. The National Renewal party saw much of its support wane in the wake of party scandals involvin ...
    Related: business organization, chile, organizations, political issues, political parties
  • Collective Bargaining - 1,251 words
    Collective Bargaining Collective Bargaining: A Great Social Invention? = "There's strength in numbers" This is a clich, or could even be called a proverb that most of us have heard at some stage in our lives. It also lies at the heart of collective bargaining, and it provides a reasonable, although simplistic reason for the use of collective bargaining, and also gives us an indication of where and for whom it is most useful. Collective bargaining's origins lie in one of man's primary instincts; defence. In an industrial relations context this is defence of proper working conditions, secure employment and proper pay. Collective bargaining allowed this by gaining pay increases through the incr ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective bargaining, social issues, industrial relations
  • Collective Bargaining In The Workplace - 2,202 words
    Collective Bargaining In The Workplace Britain has one of the most developed systems of collective bargaining in the world, especially amongst manual workers. Its sophistication is one of the main reasons why British workers traditionally pressed less for the statutory provision of basic rights in the work place than their Continental colleagues. Most trade unionists prefer to put a grievance through procedure' rather than go to an industrial tribunal. Dubin has described collective bargaining as the great social invention that has institutionalised industrial conflict' and by the Donovan Commission as right which is or should be the prerogative of every worker in a democratic society'. It c ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective action, collective bargaining, workplace
  • Collective Bargaining In The Workplace - 2,241 words
    ... d by the parties to be a legally enforceable contract unless the agreement - (a) is in writing, and (b) contains a provision which (however expressed) states that the parties intend that the agreement shall be a legally enforceable contract (2) Any collective agreement which does satisfy these conditions in subsection (1)(a) and (b) above shall be conclusively presumed to have been intended by the parties to be a legally enforceable contract.' There are four main advantages claimed for the legal enforcement of collective agreements: (a) collective agreements would have to become both more comprehensive and more precise in defining the rights and obligations of each party if their meaning ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective bargaining, workplace, different levels
  • Dachau - 1,570 words
    Dachau January 30, 1933. A black cloud began to form over Germany as Adolph Hitler became chancellor. Exactly one month later the Legal Bulletin of the Reich No. 17 stated that articles 114, 115, 117, 118, 123, 124 and 153 were no longer valid. Freedom of speech, freedom of the press and the right to assemble were now restricted. Weeks went by and these articles were still not reinstated. Little did the citizens of Germany know that these articles would not be reinstated for years (Whissen 27-38). Six weeks after the Legal bulletin of the Reich No. 17 was put out, Henreich Himmler announced that a concentration camp in Dachau, Germany had been established. This was later simply known as Dach ...
    Related: small town, carbon monoxide, trade union, macmillan, dealt
  • Decline In Union Membership In Australia - 1,584 words
    Decline In Union Membership In Australia TOPIC - The major issue tody facing the Australian trade union movement has been the decline in union density. What have been the causes, and how have the unions responded to the challenge. Figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) in 2000, show that the decline in Australian union membership continues, despite the efforts of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), to stop the slide. The ABS reports that trade union membership has dropped to 28 percent of the total workforce, compared to 1992, where there was 40 percent. (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2000.) Previous ABS findings show that these recent figures are part of ...
    Related: australia, decline, membership, trade union, union members, union membership
  • Eastern Europe From 1970 To 1990 - 356 words
    Eastern Europe - From 1970 to 1990 From 1970 to 1990, Eastern European nations realized they needed a change in their governments as well as economies. Politically, reformers and dissidents wanted to end party-state dictatorships and move towards a pluralist democracy. Economically, centrally planned economies were unsuccessful due to increased bureaucracy, excessive centralization, and debt obligation. Velvet revolutions in Eastern Europe changed countries towards market-oriented economies and pluralist democracies. Countries of the Eastern European bloc had a similar goal in the 1970s and 1980s: to end party-state dictatorships. Under party-state dictatorships, one political party dominate ...
    Related: eastern, eastern europe, eastern european, lech walesa, free elections
  • Evolution Of Labor Unions - 884 words
    Evolution Of Labor Unions What is clearly evident is that the working people of America have had to unite in struggle to achieve the gains that they have accumulated during this century. Improvements did not come easily. Organizing unions, winning the right to representation, using the collective bargaining process as the core of their activities, struggling against bias and discrimination, the working men and women of America have built a trade union movement of formidable proportions. Labor in America has correctly been described as a stabilizing force in the national economy and a bulwark of our democratic society. Furthermore, the gains that unions have been able to achieve have brought ...
    Related: american labor, evolution, labor, labor law, labor movement, labor union, labor unions
  • From Heaven To Hell - 2,032 words
    ... to his presidency and thus revolution. In 1950, the people of Guatemala elected Arbenz to be the next President of Guatemala. The following year on March 15, 1951 Arvalo left office. Unfortunately, Arvalo did not leave optimistically. Indeed, Arvalo was worried and quite pessimistic about the future of the revolution. "Prophetically, Arvalos greatest concern was not for the forces of conservatism from within, but for how perishable, frail and slippery the brilliant international doctrines of democracy and freedom were." He realized that much of the fuel for the revolution had met powerful resistance from conservative forces, and while he made possible future reforms, the revolution was f ...
    Related: liberation movement, amnesty international, central intelligence, yield, marie
  • Hitler And Stalin: The Rise To Power - 1,850 words
    Hitler and Stalin: the rise to power During the period leading up to World War II, there were two men who were on opposing sides, yet had many traits that made them much alike. One of these men was someone whos name is instantly recognizable to almost anyone today--Adolf Hitler. The other man was a major player in world history as well, but his name is not so infamous--Joseph Stalin. These men were each triumphant in their rise to power in their countries and they were very comparable in the ways that they succeeded. Their success was mostly attributed to their new ideas and, especially in Hitlers case, their politics. Although Hitler and Stalin hated each other, the two leaders were similar ...
    Related: adolf hitler, hitler, communist party, world history, aspiration
  • Juan Domingo Pern: Argentine Master Of Labor And Leader Of The Masses - 2,052 words
    Juan Domingo Pern: Argentine Master Of Labor And Leader Of The Masses Juan Domingo Pern, born in 1895 in Lobos, Argentina, was the President of Argentina on two occasions separated by eighteen years. He first came to power by the election of February 28,1946. He ruled for almost ten years until he was pressured to resign by the Argentine military and in September of 1955 he left the country. He spent almost the next twenty years in exile but never lost touch with the Argentine people and especially the Argentine labor movement. In 1973, after eighteen years of exile, Pern returned to Argentina and was elected president again with his third wife Isabel as vice-president. His power as a ruler ...
    Related: argentine, department of labor, domingo, juan, labor, labor department, labor movement
  • Keynesian Economics - 1,668 words
    Keynesian Economics Macroeconomics, branch of economics concerned with the aggregate, or overall, economy. Macroeconomics deals with economic factors such as total national output and income, unemployment, balance of payments, and the rate of inflation. It is distinct from microeconomics, which is the study of the composition of output such as the supply and demand for individual goods and services, the way they are traded in markets, and the pattern of their relative prices. At the basis of macroeconomics is an understanding of what constitutes national output, or national income, and the related concept of gross national product (GNP). The GNP is the total value of goods and services produ ...
    Related: economic activity, economic forecasting, economic growth, economics, keynesian, keynesian economics
  • Labor Union, Launched In 1866, And The Knights Of Labor, Which Reached Its Zenith In The Mid1880s On Their Face, These Reform - 1,510 words
    LABOR UNION, LAUNCHED IN 1866, AND THE KNIGHTS OF LABOR, WHICH REACHED ITS ZENITH IN THE MID-1880S. ON THEIR FACE, THESE REFORM MOVEMENTS MIGHT HAVE SEEMED AT ODDS WITH TRADE UNIONISM, AIMING AS THEY DID AT THE COOPERATIVE COMMONWEALTH RATHER THAN A HIGHER WAGE, APPEALING BROADLY TO ALL PRODUCERS RATHER THAN STRICTLY TO WAGEWORKERS, AND ESCHEWING THE TRADE UNION RELIANCE ON THE STRIKE AND BOYCOTT. BUT CONTEMPORARIES SAW NO CONTRADICTION: TRADE UNIONISM TENDED TO THE WORKERS'' IMMEDIATE NEEDS, LABOR REFORM TO THEIR HIGHER HOPES. THE TWO WERE HELD TO BE STRANDS OF A SINGLE MOVEMENT, ROOTED IN A COMMON WORKING-CLASS CONSTITUENCY AND TO SOME DEGREE SHARING A COMMON LEADERSHIP. BUT EQUALLY IMPORT ...
    Related: knights, labor, labor force, labor movement, labor party, labor union, labor unions
  • Lenin And Stalin Ideology - 4,157 words
    ... ... " Compare and contrast the ideologies and the political and economic practice of Lenin and Stalin. Every state is based upon and driven by some ideology. Imperial Russia was based upon autocratic absolutism for over 400 years. Following the Bolshevik seizure of power in 1917, a new era dawned upon Russia. For the next 36 years she would be in the hands of two men that would attempt to apply a new, vastly different creed in ruling and transforming this country. Vladimir Ilich Lenin, as the leader of the Bolshevik party, ruled Russia from October 1917 till his death in January 1924. He was succeeded by Joseph Vissarionovich Stalin, who also ruled until his death in March 1953. Both men ...
    Related: ideology, lenin, stalin, orthodox church, main argument
  • Lord Liverpool - 1,791 words
    ... ther example of the measures the administration would take to retain power. A lack of repression after 1822 can be explained by the improved economic conditions and the dying down of public unrest around this time. The government however had not changed its policy on violence as the legalisation of trade unions demonstrated in 1825 .The amendment of the previous law passed in 1824 gave harsh penalties for those using violence in trade union protests and showed the Tory governments continuos support for repression in the face of public unrest .Again 1822 did not mark a turning point in the way Liverpool approached his domestic policy as repressive measures in 1825 demonstrate .The Liberal ...
    Related: liverpool, domestic policy, laissez faire, corn laws, voyage
  • Mandela - 1,128 words
    Mandela Nelson Mandela Nelson Mandela's greatest achievements were that of turning around the African National Congress and winning the Nobel Peace prize for his fight to abolish the Apartheid system in South Africa. The African National Congress was established in 1912, and in 1919 they organized their first public action, though unfortunately it resulted in the arrest of several hundred people. Nelson Mandela joined the African National Congress in 1944, at a time when the abolishment of the Apartheid was just talk. Also in 1944, in hopes to pull younger people into the African National Congress the ANC youth league was formed. de Klerk unbanned a number of organisations including the ANC ...
    Related: mandela, nelson mandela, political rights, national congress, viable
  • Music Business - 2,447 words
    ... cal exhibition requires a synchronization license that includes a right to exhibit. The producer of the motion picture issues this license and the royalties are handled by ASCAP, BMI and SESAC. Broadcast commercial requires a negotiated license issued from the publisher. These are some of the highest earnings from special use permits. A commercial advertisement will pay thousands of dollars for the use of a popular song on a broadcasted advertisement. In these licenses the advertiser can usually alter the words to suit the product. If the music is composed specially for a commercial the composer can grant a buyout deal giving the advertiser unlimited usage of the music. ASAP, BMI, and SE ...
    Related: music, music business, music history, music industry, feature film
  • Nike Is The Leading Shoe And Athletic Apparel Company In The United States And One Of The Largest In The World In 1993, Nikes - 1,284 words
    Nike is the leading shoe and athletic apparel company in the United States and one of the largest in the world. In 1993, Nikes fiscal revenues were as large as the NBA, NFL, and Major League Baseballs television deals, ticket sales, and paraphernalia sales combined. In addition to their phenomenal sales, Nike has marketed itself so thoroughly that it has literally become a household name. Over 200 of the 324 NBA players wear Nike shoes, with over 80 of them under contract to do so. 275 professional football players and 290 Major League Baseball players join them. Nikes fame however, is not limited to professional sports. Over one half of the NCAA championship basketball teams of the past dec ...
    Related: apparel, athletic, nike, shoe, major league
  • Party Structure Of United States And Great Britain - 1,607 words
    Party Structure Of United States And Great Britain Comparing the Party Structure of the United States and Great Britain When a decision on foreign policy has to be made, looking carefully about the nations' party is especially important. Not just on the basis of their clientele, their programmes and ideology but also on their structural characteristics. In this paper, I would like to focus on comparing the two super powers which are the United States and Great Britain. Both parties of the United States and Great Britain that have established themselves successfully within the party system , and which have managed to win seats at elections , possess three levels of organizational structure. F ...
    Related: american party, britain, democratic party, great britain, labor party, national party, organizational structure
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