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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: tolstoy

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  • Anna Karenina By Leo Tolstoy 1828 1910 - 1,757 words
    Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (1828 - 1910) Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (1828 - 1910) Type of Work: Tragic love story Setting Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia; nineteenth century Principal Characters Robert Jordan, an American fighting with Spanish Loyalists Anna Karenina, a beautiful young woman Alexey, her cold, vindictive husband Count Vronsky, a young military officer who falls in love with Anna Stepan Oblonsky, Anna's spendthrift brother Dolly, Stepan's frustrated wife Kitty, Dolly's sister Levin, Stepan's rusticc friend, and Kitty's suitor Story Overveiw Stepan Oblonsky's wife Dolly had discovered that her husband was having an affair. With her beauty fading and her household a wreck, ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, leo tolstoy, tolstoy
  • Death Of Ivan Ilych By Tolstoy - 676 words
    Death of Ivan Ilych By Tolstoy Leo Tolstoy, born in Russia in 1828, wrote The Death of Ivan Ilych. The story was written eight years after Tolstoys spiritual conversion and was inspired by his own brothers death. The Death of Ivan Ilych has several ironies expressed in the story. Ilych expressed his denial, anger, depression and acceptance towards dying very visibly. Ilych expressed denial of his condition when he laughed about his accident. Ilych was explaining to the upholsterer how he wanted the drapes to hand and he slipped off the ladder. He hit his side against the knob of the window frame. He told his wife it was only a bruise. Since he was fairly athletic, he said he did not get seri ...
    Related: death of ivan ilych, ilych, ivan, ivan ilych, leo tolstoy, tolstoy
  • How Much Land Does A Man Need By Leo Tolstoy - 988 words
    "How Much Land Does A Man Need?" by Leo Tolstoy The Greed of Americans During Westward Expansion The story, "How Much Land Does a Man Need?", by Leo Tolstoy is a story about Americans taking advantage of the Indians. Although it is set in Russia, it is about the greed that many people had at the time and the outcome of that greed. The opening scene represents the Europeans coming over to America. During that time, the mid-1800s, the Europeans were rich and their relatives in America were poor. The younger sister in the story represents the Americans and the older sister represents the Europeans. The poor Americans, like the younger sister in the story, did not mind having to work hard all th ...
    Related: leo tolstoy, tolstoy, english speaking, east coast, english-speaking
  • How Much Land Does A Man Need By Leo Tolstoy The Greed Of Americans During Westward Expansion The Story, How Much Land Does A - 988 words
    "How Much Land Does A Man Need?" by Leo Tolstoy The Greed of Americans During Westward Expansion The story, How Much Land Does a Man Need?, by Leo Tolstoy is a story about Americans taking advantage of the Indians. Although it is set in Russia, it is about the greed that many people had at the time and the outcome of that greed. The opening scene represents the Europeans coming over to America. During that time, the mid-1800s, the Europeans were rich and their relatives in America were poor. The younger sister in the story represents the Americans and the older sister represents the Europeans. The poor Americans, like the younger sister in the story, did not mind having to work hard all the ...
    Related: american people, expansion, greed, leo tolstoy, native americans, tolstoy, westward
  • War And Peace By Leo Tolstoy - 1,119 words
    War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy Then novel War and Peace was written by a famous Russian author Leo Tolstoy in 1865. The novel describes the war with Napoleon in which many countries were involved such as Russia, Austrian, Prussia, Spain, Sweden, and Britain. The novel mainly focuses on Russia. It reflects the different views and participation in the war of Russian aristocracy and peasants and also shows Tolstoys negative viewpoint on the war. Showing the war, Tolstoy describes Napoleons attack on Russia, the battle of Borodino, the slow retrieval of the Russian army, the conquest of Moscow by Napoleon, the fire in Moscow, and the retrieval of Napoleons army during a deadly winter. Naopleon had ...
    Related: leo tolstoy, tolstoy, war and peace, russian army, french army
  • 1984 Vs Animal Farm - 1,262 words
    ... n with us. Animal Farm basically deals with how seeking totalitarian power can and will destroy any attempt at revolution and how power can corrupt even the most probable utopias. One night when Farmer Jones has gone to bed drunk, Old Major, the pig in charge of all, assembles all of the animals of Manor Farm to tell them of a dream he had concerning man's and animal's place in life. He points out how animals are literally worked to death by man, who consumes but does not produce, and thus must remove man by means of rebellion. Shortly thereafter, he dies and the animals begin preparation for this Revolution, whenever it may come. When the hungry animals attack and drive off Jones one da ...
    Related: 1984, animal farm, farm, manor farm, encarta encyclopedia
  • Anna Karanina - 786 words
    Anna Karanina L.E.A.P. Journal for Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy A. Section covered: Part 1 and 2 (pages 17-245) B. Summary: This story first starts out with chaos in the Oblonsky's household. Prince Stephen Oblonsky's wife Dolly found out that he was having an affair with their children's French governess and threatened to move out of the house and take the kids with her. Stephen Oblonsky does not feel bad for having an affair. What he feels bad for is getting caught by his wife. Even though he is upset he is happy to hear the news that his sister, Anna Karenina, is coming to town though. Later in the section Anna convinces Dolly to stay with her husband and not move out. It did not take muc ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, personal reaction, family problems, glad
  • Anna Karenina - 1,503 words
    Anna Karenina The world of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina is a world ruled by chance. From the very opening chapters, where a watchman is accidentally run over by a train at Moscow's Petersburg station, to the final, climactic scenes of arbitrary destruction when Levin searches for Kitty in a forest beset by lightning, characters are brought together and forced into action against their will by coincidence and, sometimes, misfortune. That Anna and Vronsky ever meet and begin the fateful affair that becomes the centerpiece of the novel is itself a consequence of a long chain of unrelated events: culminating Anna's sharing a berth with Vronsky's mother on her way to reconcile Dolly and Stiva in Mosco ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, immanuel kant, book of deuteronomy
  • Anna Karenina - 1,545 words
    ... else's thoughts, whether occasioned by chalk marks on a leather table cover or by the subtlest nuance in someone's eyes, in contrast to the falsehoods of social language that obscure and separate people, create a few brief and sometime ecstatic moments of penetration between usually separate conciousnesses, a transcending of interpersonal space. And yet words are still the tools by which, literally, men live or die. Levin's search for structure, as mentioned above, may be considered a struggle to find a language of truth. Nowhere is this more evident than in Levin's observation of the sky that occurs first at the end of the mowing scene and then much later in Part VIII, an example both ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, tragic hero, cause and effect
  • Anna Karenina - 1,352 words
    Anna Karenina Leo Tolstoy's novel, Anna Karenina, upon its release received a mix critical reception, with Russian critics either condemning or applauding the novel primarily on its views of Russian society. Thematically, the novel parallels its heroine's, Anna Karenina, moral and social conflicts with Constantin Levin's internal struggle to find the meaning of life. There are many others underlying themes which links the novel as a whole, yet many critics at the time only looked upon its critical view of Russian life. Henry James called Tolstoy's novels as "loose and baggy monsters' of stylessness, but Tolstoy stated of Anna Karenina ".....I am very proud of its architecture--its vaults are ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, leo tolstoy, true essence
  • Anna Karenina - 764 words
    Anna Karenina This story first starts out with chaos in the Oblonskys household. Prince Stephen Oblonsky's wife Dolly found out that he was having an affair with their childrens French governess and threatened to move out of the house and take the kids with her. Stephen Oblonsky does not feel bad for having an affair. What he feels bad for is getting caught by his wife. Even though he is upset he is happy to hear the news that his sister, Anna Karenina, is coming to town though. Later in the section Anna convinces Dolly to stay with her husband and not move out. It did not take much to convince her because her threats were empty. Oblonsky is the head of a distinguished Government Board in Mo ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, social behavior, family problems
  • Anna Karenina Part 2 Ch 3 - 916 words
    Anna Karenina Part 2 Ch. 3 Anna Karenina Part 2 Ch. 3 In part two chapter three, Kittys broken heart causes her health to decline. There is a moment in this part of the story that Tolstoy adds to show that money and social status should not be the reasons for marriage. Kitty realizes this when she finds out about Anna and Vronsky. Kitty has something that sets her apart from the other women in her family, pride. Her pride makes her different from her sisters and her mother in that she does not want to marry someone that she does not love and vice versa. What she says tells the reader that she will not put up with adultery. This particular moment occurs between Kitty and her sister Dolly whil ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, young girl, happy marriage
  • Assessment Of Into The Wild - 841 words
    Assessment Of Into The Wild Although precisely on target in his assessment of Chris McCandless being in touch with the bare-bones essence of nature, Gordon Young's preceding description of Chris should be rephrased: A profoundly Un-American figure, uncompromising in his approach and thoroughly optimistic about the future. For Chris McCandless did not set out to show or prove his American character. Neither does he approve or want to exemplify a true modern American character, because true American character does not seek solitude, preferring the saddle to the streetcar, or the star-sprinkled sky to a roof, or, especially, the obscure and difficult trail, leading into the unknown, to any pave ...
    Related: assessment, modern american, different ways, huck finn, charity
  • Bring On The Cheesecake - 1,408 words
    Bring On The Cheesecake I AM ... beautiful. As you are beautiful, as he is beautiful, as all of us, even our enemies, are beautiful. And yet, most of us spend a good portion of our everyday lives looking in the mirror, critiquing ourselves, pointing out problem areas, and generally going ugh. We compare ourselves to Kate Moss, Ricky Martin, Nicole Kidman, Brad Pitt, and Brittney Spears, all of whom in our eyes exemplify the ultimate in beauty, sensuality, and ... airbrushing. Yes, airbrushing, that oh-so-handy technique employed by magazines worldwide to make the attractive look perfect. Perfect? You call Kate Moss perfect? Every time I see her picture, I just want to force-feed her a huge p ...
    Related: plastic surgery, health risks, media images, entitled, michael
  • Comparison Of Peter The Great And Louis The 14th - 1,017 words
    Comparison Of Peter The Great And Louis The 14Th Video Paper # 1 In this paper I will be comparing the rule of Peter the Great and Louis the XIV. I will also be telling you about the similarities and differences between the videos on the Sun King and Peter I. Information on the leaders Homes St. Petersburg and Versailles will also be included in this essay. For the first paragraph I would like to start off by talking about Chateau de Versailles. Versailles took over 50 years to build, which took hundreds of workers lives. The original residence, built from 1631 to 1634, was primarily a hunting lodge and private retreat for Louis XIII. Not the least important element at Versailles was the lan ...
    Related: comparison, king louis, king louis xiv, louis, louis xiv, peter, peter the great
  • Death Penalty - 1,120 words
    ... ing wrong. What principles do you think they are going to live by? What you say, or what you do? The Death Penalty goes back many, many years. It started out as hangings, shootings, and decapitations, and moved to gas chambers, and electric chairs, and the newest-lethal injections. We may have moved up the scale with the brutality to which the sentence is carried out, but even back then, it was thought to be most immoral. Tolstoy, an eyewitness of a Paris execution in the 1800's, states it well. When I saw how the head was separated from the body and as it dropped noisily into the basket, I understood, not with my reason, but with my whole being that no theories of the rationality of mod ...
    Related: death penalty, penalty, christian life, good and evil, noble
  • Gandhi - 1,537 words
    Gandhi Gandhi Gandhi, lived from 1869-1948 and was also known as Mahatma Gandhi, was born in Porbandar, in the modern state of Gujarat, on October 2, 1869, into a Hindu family, Both his father and grandfather having been prime ministers of two adjacent and tiny states. After a modest career at school, he went to London in 1888 to train as a lawyer, leaving behind his young wife, whom he had married when she was in her teens. In London, Gandhi encountered theosophists, vegetarians, and others who were disenchanted not only with industrialism, but with the legacy of Enlightenment thought. They themselves represented the fringe elements of English society. Gandhi was powerfully attracted to the ...
    Related: gandhi, mahatma gandhi, rabindranath tagore, british india, species
  • Gandhi Teachings - 1,287 words
    Gandhi Teachings From Gandhi, to Gandhiji, to Mahatma and Bapu, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi has traveled the distance from being the national hero to a legend. Gandhi, in life, was much more. Gandhi was a thinker, a philosopher, and also a statesman. He believed he could lead only if he was a worthy leader. To be a worthy leader he had to be morally strong. As he used to say, "A liar could not teach his pupils to speak the truth, a coward can not train young men to be brave." So to be morally strong, he believed one has to be strong in spirit. To be strong in spirit, one must live in accordance with one's beliefs, by a strict code of conduct. With such an all-encompassing vision of life, ever ...
    Related: gandhi, karamchand gandhi, mahatma gandhi, mohandas karamchand gandhi, south african
  • Isaiah Berlin - 1,058 words
    Isaiah Berlin Isaiah Berlin became one of our centurys most important political theorists for liberty and liberalism in an age of totalitarianism. He was born in Riga, Latvia in 1909 into a well to do Jewish family. At the age of 12 he moved to Petrograd and experienced first hand the Bolshevik revolution, which would later influence his intellectual ideas about totalitarianism (Gray 3). In 1921 his family moved to London and sent Isaiah to school. His schooling lead him to Oxford where he took a position as philosophy professor in 1931. His English schooling led him to become a disciple of classical liberalism in the English tradition of Mill, Locke, and others (Berger). During World War II ...
    Related: berlin, isaiah, political theory, foreign service, hardy
  • Madama Bovary Anna Karenina - 1,491 words
    Madama Bovary & Anna Karenina Reading provides an escape for people from the ordinariness of everyday life. Madame Bovary and Anna Karenina, dissatisfied with their lives pursued their dreams of ecstasy and love through reading. At the beginning of both novels Anna Karenina and Emma Bovary made active decisions about their future although these decisions were not always rational. As their lives started to disintegrate Emma and Anna sought to live out their dreams and fantasies through reading. Reading served as morphine allowing them to escape the pain of everyday life, but reading like morphine closed them off from the rest of the world preventing them from making rational decisions. It was ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, bovary, emma bovary, karenina, madame bovary
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