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  • 65279 It Is Unusual When A Masterpiece Develops Out Of An Assignment, But That Is, More Or Less, What - 1,904 words
    It is unusual when a masterpiece develops out of an assignment, but that is, more or less, what happened in the case of Gullivers Travels. The Martinus Scriblerus Club proposed to satirize the follies and vices of learned, scientific and modern men. Each of the members was given a topic, and Swifts was to satirize the numerous and popular volumes describing voyages to faraway lands. Ten years passed between the Scriblerus project and the publication of Gullivers Travels, but when Swift finished, he had completed a definitive work in travel literature. Moreover, he had completed what was to become a childrens classic (in its abridged form) and a satiric masterpiece. Swifts main character, Gul ...
    Related: masterpiece, unusual, make sense, time passes, principal
  • : Chicken Yakitori - 1,383 words
    : Chicken Yakitori Japanese Skewered Chicken Ingredients 3 green onions, cut into 1" strips lengthwise 8 green peppers, quartered and seeded 2/3 lb. chicken livers 1 clove garlic 1-1/3 lb. boned, skinless chicken breast Barbecue Sauce: 1/2 cup soy sauce 1/2 cup mirin 1-2 tablespoons sugar pepper bamboo skewers or sticks Method: 1. Pierce skewer through sides of green onions. Skewer green peppers in the same way. 2. Cut livers into 4-6 pieces. Soak in water to remove odor. 3. Crush garlic, add to 5 cups boiling water; add livers (do not overcook), drain in colander. Skewer livers. 4. Cut chicken into bite-size pieces. 5. Thread chicken on skewers. 6. Arrange skewers on platter. 7. Simmer Barb ...
    Related: chicken, first half, north america, lemon juice, sauce
  • A Myriad Of Mysteries Is Contained In The Pages Of The Old Testament For Centuries, Scholars Of Theology, Archeology And Anth - 1,419 words
    A myriad of mysteries is contained in the pages of the Old Testament. For centuries, scholars of theology, archeology and anthropology have labored to produce some explanation of the contradictions and impossibilities put forth in these texts. The ancient ruins of lost cities reveal evidence that some writings may be incorrectly dated, or even that they may be false. Faith and tradition give way to speculation that the Bible may be nothing more than a collection of ancient Israelite mythology. Some things, however, prove tantalizingly true. Temple Judaism and its monarchy, for example, are historical fact; the records of surrounding civilizations corroborate the chronicling of their place in ...
    Related: anth, archeology, myriad, pages, testament
  • A Tale Of Two Cities - 1,181 words
    A Tale Of Two Cities Resurrection in A Tale of Two Cities Resurrection is a powerful theme found throughout the plot of A Tale of Two Cities. Many of the characters in the novel are involved with the intertwining themes of love, redemption, and good versus evil. The theme of resurrection involves certain aspects of all of these themes and brings the story together. Dr. Manette is the first person to experience resurrection in A Tale of Two Cities. He is taken away from his pregnant wife and then imprisoned for eighteen very long years. Over the years, his condition deteriorates until he forgets his real name and mindlessly cobbles shoes to pass the time. In Book the First, he is released by ...
    Related: tale, tale of two cities, jerry cruncher, specific purpose, endanger
  • Abraham Of Chaldea - 1,547 words
    Abraham of Chaldea Annonymous The following is a narrative description on the life and times of one of the most powerful characters in the Old Testament. Abraham was indeed a man of God in a time where few men believed in the One true God. Through many triumphs and errors, he always returned to God to lead him back to his calling. His dedication resulted in great promises from God that were eventually fulfilled and affect each of our lives today. His story is our story. Abraham was a native of Chaldea, and a ninth generation descendant of Shem, the son of Noah. He was born on the southern tip of the Tigris and Uuphrates rivers in the city of Ur around 2161BC.1 Before his name was changed to ...
    Related: abraham, most high, unknown territory, maker, valley
  • Abstract On Rose Diseases - 2,160 words
    abstract on Rose diseases title = abstract on Rose diseases Disease Control Multi-Purpose Fungicide Daconil 2787 Plant Disease Control This product is widely used for broad spectrum disease control on lawns, ornamentals and listed fruits and vegetables. Controls many foliar diseases such as: rust, black spot, leaf spot, blights, anthracnose and powdery mildew as listed on the label. Also controls conifer diseases and lawn diseases such as brown patch, red thread, rust and dollar spot. Can be mixed with insecticides as specified on the label to make a multi-purpose spray. WHAT IS POWDERY MILDEW? Powdery Mildew looks like white fuzzy powder that accumulates on leaves and stems predominantly in ...
    Related: abstract, disease control, disease prevention, florida state, cultural practices
  • Adrienne Rich - 1,719 words
    Adrienne Rich "What I know, I know through making poems" Passion, Politics and the Body in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich Liz Yorke, Nottingham Trent University, England This paper is largely extracted from my book Adrienne Rich, which is to be published by Sage in October this year...What I have tried to do for the paper is to track one thread explored by the book, which I feel runs through the whole span of Rich's thought, a thread which links desire, passion, and the body - to politics, to activism, and to the writing of poetry. Writing poetry, above all, involves a willingness to let the unconscious speak - a willingness to listen within for the whispers that tell of what we know, even thou ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, natural order, unconscious mind, feminism
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn - 917 words
    Adventures of Huck Finn In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Jim and Huck use and believe in many superstitions. There are many examples from the book that show this in the characters. Most of the superstitions are very ridiculous, but some actually make a little sense. In the first example, Huck seen a spider was crawling on his shoulder and he flipped it off and it landed in a lit candle. It shriveled up and died. Huck said it would fetch him some awful bad luck. He got up and turned around three times and crossed his breast every time. Then he tied up a little lock of his hair with a thread to keep witches away. He says that the ritual he did was for losing a found horseshoe and did not ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn
  • Adventures Of Tom Sawyer - 806 words
    Adventures Of Tom Sawyer I. Introduction A. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain B. This type of book is realistic fiction. C. The main character is Thomas Sawyer, a twelve year old boy, whose parents are dead. Tom lives with his aunt, Polly. Tom is busy either making trouble or thinking up new schemes. Another character is Huckelberry Finn, hated by all mothers and loved by all children. Tom is friends with Huck and they share many adventures together. Becky Thatcher, the daughter of a judge, who likes Tom but sometimes fights with him. Injun Joe is an indian who kills someone named Dr. Robinson and makes everyone believe that the real killer is a man named Muff Potter. Mr. Potter, a ...
    Related: adventures of tom sawyer, sawyer, the adventures of tom sawyer, tom sawyer, poor tom
  • African Culture - 1,532 words
    African Culture When trying to compare and contrast the music-culture and society of the Mbuti and that of the Venda, it becomes difficult to comment on sound when we haven't heard any Venda music. It's easy to recognize that for the Mbuti the music embodies the heart of the forest, and for the Venda the relation to nature is the act of a mother giving birth. Thinking about concept and behavior this makes the music performed by the two cultures separate and distinguishable. This is where culture and environment become important factors. How noticeable is this when listening to the music of both peoples? When given the opportunity to listen, without a trained ear, it would be difficult to fin ...
    Related: african, african culture, popular music, social issues, humor
  • After The Atomic Bomb - 1,117 words
    ... 1946 the United Nations created the Atomic Energy Commission to propose peaceful usage of atomic energy and "eventual elimination of weapons of mass destruction" ("International Agreements" 1). The Commission's attempt to somewhat control the usage of atomic energy became a failure when the Soviet Union vetoed the plan (1). In 1958, however, conferences between the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union met in Geneva to discuss a treaty banning nuclear testing (1). The three nations agreed on voluntary disarmament for a full year (1). The voluntary disarmament seemed like a great leap forward for all three nations until the Soviet Union resumed testing in 1961 (1). President ...
    Related: atomic, atomic bomb, atomic energy, bomb, twentieth century
  • Alcoholosm - 1,165 words
    ... ven a small head size. Furthermore, FAS children may develop hearing problems, heart defects and physical and behavioural problems. Researchers have also found that some children who were exposed to alcohol during fetal development show only some of the characteristics of FAS, these children are diagnosed as having fetal alcohol effects (FAE). However, both FAS and FAE individuals may have some degree of brain damage (Brent, 1991). Clearly, in addition to physiological, social, and psychological factors which all play a role in contributing to alcoholism, recent studies reveal that there may be a genetic predisposition to alcoholism. More specifically, medical research indicates that alc ...
    Related: natural history, university press, york oxford university press, science, abnormal
  • Although At First Sight The Dsmiv Classification System Appears To Provide Clinicians With A Useful Framework Of Which To Vie - 1,974 words
    Although at first sight the DSM-IV classification system appears to provide clinicians with a useful framework of which to view their clients, on closer inspection however, the picture is somewhat less satisfactory. Criticisms of the system range from Wakefield's (1997) analysis that psychological presentation ranges from problems of living to harmful dysfunction; through to Livesley, Schroeder & Jang's (1994) counter-argument that evidence of discontinuity between different diagnoses and normality would support the DSM's proposal of distinct diagnostic categories. Since these issues involved are quite distinct, both these points of view are presented in relation to a cause and consequence d ...
    Related: classification, framework, university press, mental disorder, application
  • Analysis Of Pearl In Hawthornes The Scarlet Letter - 1,246 words
    Analysis Of Pearl In Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter Analysis of Pearl in Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter One of the most significant writers of the romantic period in American literature was Nathaniel Hawthorne. Hawthorne wrote stories that opposed the ideas of Transcendentalism. Since he had ancestors of Puritan belief, Hawthorne wrote many stories about Puritan New England. His most famous story is the Scarlet Letter. This novel tells of the punishment of a woman, Hester Prynne, who committed adultery and gave birth to Pearl. A minister of Boston, Arthur Dimmesdale, had an affair with Hester while believing that her husband, Roger Chillingworth, had died. However, Chillingworth did not die ...
    Related: nathaniel hawthorne, pearl, scarlet, scarlet letter, the scarlet letter
  • Ancestor Worship - 1,174 words
    Ancestor Worship 4. Compare and contrast Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. How are they similar? How are they different? 5. Describe the Chinese tradition of ancestor worship. -Question 4. Buddhism Has over 300 million members, and was founded around 2, 500 years ago in India. The founder is Gautama Siddhartha, the Buddha, or referred to as the Enlightened One. Their major scripture are The Triptaka, Anguttara-Nikaya, Dhammapada, Sutta-Nipata, Samyutta-Nikaya and many others. Buddhism today is divided into three main sects: Theravada, or Hinayana (Sri Lanka, Thailand, Burma, Cambodia), Mahayana (China, Japan, Vietnam, Korea), and Vajrayana (Tibet, Mongolia and Japan). Their Life goal is Ni ...
    Related: ancestor worship, worship, everyday life, famous people, hunting
  • Animal Farm - 986 words
    Animal Farm The main purpose of satire is to attack, and intensely criticise the target subject. This is superbly carried out in the classic piece of satire, Animal Farm. The main targets at the brunt of this political satire are the society that was created in Russia after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, and the leaders involved in it. George Orwell successfully condemns these targets through satirical techniques such as irony, fable, and allegory. The immediate object of attack in Orwell's political satire is the society that was created in Russia after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. The events narrated in Animal Farm obviously and continuously refer to events in another story, the hi ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, russian revolution, using animals, concrete
  • Antisemitism Influence - 2,194 words
    ... od alone operating from within, and not of man working-or rather playing-from without. If these offences be taken away, worse will follow. For they are thus given over by the wrath of God to reprobation, that they may become incorrigible, as Ecclesiastes says, for every one who is incorrigible is rendered worse rather than better by correction. Farewell in the Lord; pardon my words, and pray the Lord for my sinning soul." "Martin Luther's to George Spalatin," from Luthers Correspondence and Other Contemporary, Letters, trans. by P. Smith (1913), Vol. 1, pp. 28-29. www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1514luther.html So we see he was absolutely determined that the Jews would and should convert to ...
    Related: antisemitism, lord jesus, german people, the bible, omitted
  • Authorship Theory - 1,081 words
    Authorship Theory For a host of persuasive but commonly disregarded reasons, the Earl of Oxford has quietly become by far the most compelling man to be found behind the mask of Shake-speare. As Orson Welles put it in 1954, I think Oxford wrote Shakespeare. If you don't agree, there are some awful funny coincidences incidences to explain away. Some of these coincidences are obscure, others are hard to overlook. A 1578 Latin encomium to Oxford, for example, contains some highly suggestive praise: Pallas lies concealed in thy right hand, it says. Thine eyes flash fire; Thy countenance shakes spears. Elizabethans knew that Pallas Athena was known by the sobriquet the spear-shaker. The hyphen in ...
    Related: authorship, christopher marlowe, edmund spenser, common sense, theater
  • Aztec Nation - 2,989 words
    ... e would be told that he would be a warrior whose mission was to feed the Sun with the blood of enemies and if the infant was a girl she was to spend her days doing household chores and help the family. In about four days the father would call an astrologer to read the child's horoscope and determine the appropriate day for the naming ceremony. After a naming ceremony, the name was announced and the news was spread by little boys who ran through the streets shouting. Each child had a calendrical name taken from the day of birth and also a personal name which belonged to him alone(Bray 1969). Education was considered extremely important. Even from an infant to age four the child was taught ...
    Related: aztec, aztec empire, aztec gods, aztec religion, book encyclopedia
  • Aztecs - 1,657 words
    ... The land around the lakes was fertile but not large enough to produce food for the population, which expanded steadily as the empire grew. To make more land suitable for farming, the Aztec developed irrigation systems, formed terraces on hillsides, and used fertilizer to enrich the soil. Their most important agricultural technique, however, was to reclaim swampy land around the lakes by creating chinampas, or artificial islands that are known popularly as floating gardens. To make the chinampas, the Aztec dug canals through the marshy shores and islands, then heaped the mud on huge mats made of woven reeds. They anchored the mats by tying them to posts driven into the lake bed and plant ...
    Related: aztec empire, aztecs, mexico city, spanish conquest, gulf
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