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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: thomas aquinas

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  • St Thomas Aquinas - 1,108 words
    St. Thomas Aquinas What is the Best Way to Prove God? A Comparison of St. Thomas Aquinas St. Thomas Aquinas is one of the greatest theologians that has ever been. He recognized that there were some people who doubted the existence of God because, to them, logic did not allow for or explain God's existence. Being a devout Christian, he naturally believed in God, but he wanted to prove God's existence to those who could not accept things on faith alone. As a result, we have five proofs of the existence of God by St. Thomas Aquinas, all of which are based on logic and observation of nature. One of his proofs is based on the idea of a first mover and another is based on the idea that intelligenc ...
    Related: aquinas, thomas aquinas, scientific theory, different ways, naturally
  • Thomas Aquinas - 1,502 words
    Thomas Aquinas Saint Thomas Aquinas, as a philosopher, wrote several works that justified Christianity in a philosophical context, taking cue on Aristotle's old writings. Naturally, Aquinas took up on the Church's ultra-conservative views on sexuality and worked to rationalize them through his own theory of natural law. Aquinas argues against any form of sex where the intention to produce children is not involved. He explains this through his theory of natural law, where sex is purely for the purpose of reproduction to ensure the continuance of the human race, only in the context of a monogamous relationship, and not for simple physical pleasure. There are many laws that Saint Thomas Aquinas ...
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  • Thomas Aquinas: Life And Works - 1,577 words
    Thomas Aquinas: Life And Works Thomas Aquinas: Life and Works Thomas Aquinas, born in 1225 in Roccasecca Italy, began his studies as early as age five. His parents enrolled him in a monastery where he would receive education in grammar, rhetoric, and logic.(McInerny, 2) His instruction was complemented with a r orous studying of the Bible. Several years later Aquinas transferred to Naples where he pursued his thirst for knowledge with the works of Aristotle.(McInerny, 2) At the university Aquinas entered a program of scripture study and oration, which genera y required 10-15 years before one was granted mastery in the field. After completing a thesis on the Sentences, written by Lombard in t ...
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  • The Question Of Being: What It Is, Why It Matters - 1,317 words
    "The Question Of Being": What It Is, Why It Matters. Martin Heidegger attempts to answer the "question of Being" by appealing to the terminology and methodology of Dasein, most commonly defined as existence. Dasein is not simply any kind of existence, however, but an existence that is unique from all other existences in that it asks the question of existence while existing in the existence itself. In other words, one must first understand Dasein in order to understand Being because Dasein is a kind of being that is concerned about its very Being. Contrary to the popular opinion that in order to truly and clearly comprehend any phenomenon, the subject which interrogates must necessarily stand ...
    Related: thomas aquinas, martin heidegger, true meaning, reflective, disclosure
  • Anselm And Aquinas - 1,195 words
    Anselm and Aquinas Although born in Alpine Italy and educated in Normandy, Anselm became a Benedictine monk, teacher, and abbot at Bec and continued his ecclesiastical career in England. Having been appointed the second Norman archbishop of Canterbury in 1093, Anselm secured the Westminster Agreement of 1107, guaranteeing the (partial) independence of the church from the civil state. In a series of short works such as De Libertate Arbitrii (On Free Will), De Casu Diaboli (The Fall of the Devil), and Cur Deus Homo (Why God became Man), Anselm propounded a satisfaction theory of the atonement and defended a theology like Augustines', that emphasized the methodological priority of faith over re ...
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  • Are These Not Also Men - 718 words
    Are These Not Also Men? "Are These Not Also Men?" In 1511, Fray Antonio Montesinos spoke the words, "Are these not also men?" His famous quote was a response to the mistreatment of the indigenous peoples that inhabited the Americas, by the conquering Spanish. Immediately upon discovering and colonizing the New World a widespread debate arose in regards to the usage and treatment of the native Indians. This debate was primarily focused on how to classify the Indians. Many people believed that the Indians were not human at all and should be allowed to be treated merely as slaves. The opposing side, the church, argued back that the Indians, no matter how seemingly uncivilized they lived, were h ...
    Related: spanish conquerors, pope paul, point of view, seemingly, opposing
  • Arguments For Existence Of God - 1,093 words
    Arguments For Existence Of God Many philosophers and theologians have provided varying arguments for the existence of God. These arguments are either a priori, understood independent of worldly experience and observation (Ontological Argument), or a posteriori, dependent on experience and based on observations of how the world is (Cosmological and Teleological Arguments). This paper will focus on the Cosmological Argument, and show that its underlying principle, the Principle of Sufficient Reason, fails to establish it as a sound argument for the existence of God. To accomplish this, I will, first, define the Cosmological Argument and the Principle of Sufficient Reason; then explain the argu ...
    Related: cosmological argument, existence of god, ontological argument, saint thomas aquinas, eighteenth century
  • Aristotle On Pleasure - 2,610 words
    Aristotle On Pleasure After nine books of contemplating different aspects of the human good, Aristotle uses this opportunity to claim contemplation as the highest form of pleasure. The final book in Nicomachean Ethics is concerned with pleasures: the understanding of each kind, and why some pleasures are better than other pleasures. The book is essentially divided into two main parts, being pleasure and happiness. I will use Terence Irwin's translation and subdivisions as a guiding map for my own enquiry, and any quotation from will be taken from this text. Irwin divides the book into three sections: Pleasure, Happiness: Further discussion, and Ethics, Moral Education and Politics. With this ...
    Related: aristotle, pleasure, different ways, different aspects, relation
  • Catholic Church And Contraception - 1,451 words
    Catholic Church And Contraception The issue of contraception has been an extremely controversial and debated one in the Catholic Church. The Catholic religion declares that the three requirements for healthy sexual expression include a mutual physical drive for pleasure, intimacy and committed love between the couple, and the openness to procreation and parenting children. This last aspect is the subject of much disagreement between people both inside and outside the church community. The authoritative voice of the church, the Magisterium, holds that artificial contraception is a sin and only accepts the form of contraception called Natural Family Planning. This method involves avoiding sexu ...
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  • Cosmogony - 1,112 words
    Cosmogony What is cosmogony? Cosmogony can be defined as a study of the physical universe in terms of its originating time and space. In other words, cosmogony is the study of the universe and its origins. The origin and the nature of the universe have been one of the most debated topics throughout history. Both the scientific and theological communities have yet to ascertain a common ground on how the universe came into being and whether it was an act of "God" or merely a spontaneous and random phenomenon. New discoveries in the scientific world provide new viewpoints on the creation of the universe and its relevance to a supreme intelligent "Creator." Due to mankind's constantly changing p ...
    Related: cosmogony, human experience, david hume, thomas aquinas, contribute
  • Cosmogony - 1,060 words
    ... ot know anything about God or the creation of the universe. The acknowledgement of different religious viewpoints, the establishment of the agnostic position, and the use of the empiricist principle, are new ideas used in the argument for the origin of the universe. The 18th century Enlightenment values are highly evident in Hume's text. It is obvious how the 13th century argument presented by Aquinas has changed in order to accommodate the new viewpoints available in the 18th century. Through the analysis of Hume's work, and put in comparison with earlier views, the development of the argument for the origin of the universe is easily identifiable. John F. Haught in Science and Religion: ...
    Related: cosmogony, changing nature, point of view, big bang theory, mediate
  • Critique On Whether God Exists - 1,129 words
    Critique On Whether God Exists "Whether God Exists" Countless philosophers since the beginning of recorded history have pondered the question of whether God exists. One such philosopher, Saint Thomas Aquinas, put forth his own theory on the existence of God. In his text "Whether God Exists", he stated that through his five arguments he could prove God's existence. His five arguments are from motion, from first efficient cause, from possibility and necessity, from gradation, and from design. Aquinas begins his text with two objections as to why God does not exist. The first states that God does not exist because the word "God" has the meaning of infinite goodness. Therefore, if God actually e ...
    Related: critique, saint thomas aquinas, point of view, god's existence, valid
  • Doctrine Of Creation - 1,325 words
    Doctrine Of Creation Doctrine of creation 'What do we mean by creation? How helpful are making, emanation and/or artistic work as analogies? Is it a doctrine about the world's beginnings or origin, or about its present or future existence, or what? Creation is often referred to as a 'mystery' and this is due to its perhaps ambiguous nature. Christian theology defines creation in many different ways, which differ greatly as viewpoints on the same theme. John Macquarrie tries to make the mystery clearer by using two analogies to try to describe what creation actually is. The first of these is that of 'making'. This is best understood alongside the literal understanding of creation, which can b ...
    Related: christian doctrine, doctrine, free will, natural law, affinity
  • Does God Exist - 953 words
    Does God Exist What is God? Who is God? Why do some people conclude that a God exists? Saint Thomas Aquinas goes from the fact that there must be a first efficient cause to the conclusion that God is that cause. Why must Aquinas make the extraordinary jump from there being a cause, to assuming that this cause must be God? Would it not be just as plausible to make matter the first cause? Matter is the substance that any physical object is composed of. Matter is closed and finite, with no beginning or end. The best explanation to the existence of God, is that God does not exist as a first efficient cause. The argument for God, as presented by Aquinas, is to show that the existence of the world ...
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  • Edith Stein - 730 words
    Edith Stein Edith Stein Edith Stein was born on October 12, 1891 , Yom Kippur, the Jewish day of Atonement in Breslau Germany now Wroclaw Poland. She was born into an Orthodox Jewish family and was the youngest of 11 children. When she was not yet 2 years of age, her father suddenly died. This left Edith's mother to raise the seven remaining children since 4 had died in childhood and manage the family business. She considered her mother an example of the woman in Proverbs 31, who rises early to care for her family and trade in the marketplace. At around the age of 13 she no longer practiced her Jewish faith and became an atheist although she admired her mother's attitude of total openness to ...
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  • Ethics And Abortion - 828 words
    Ethics And Abortion Nicole Brockway Philosophy Professor Shibles Dec 1999 Ethics and Abortion Since the beginning of time, women have faced oppression in every area of our lives. While people around the world fought and gained the rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, it seemed the women of the world were being denied these rights. Women have worked long and hard to gain equality and the right to be in charge of their own bodies. As a woman of the 1990's, about to reach the turn of the century, I feel it is my place to continue to fight for the rights of my gender. As a long time supporter of the pro-choice movement, I have come to see that there are numerous arguments for p ...
    Related: abortion, ethics, mifflin company, unborn child, divide
  • Gender Differences In Communication - 966 words
    Gender Differences In Communication Gender Differences in Communication Every race, culture, civilization, and society on this planet shares two things in common: the presence of both the male and female sex, and the need to communicate between the two. The subject of gender differences appears to have engaged peoples curiosity for as long as people have been writing down their thoughts, from as far back as the writing of the creation of Adam and Eve, to its current popular expression in books such as Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus. The assertion that men and women communicate in different ways, about different things, and for different reasons seems to go un-argued and is accepted ...
    Related: communication quarterly, gender, gender differences, gender gap, deborah tannen
  • God Existence - 1,440 words
    God Existence If you take a look up out in the sky on a seemingly clear night, try and ask yourself how the stars, the moon and everything else came to be. Again the question of existence takes over your mind the same way it did everyone else's years ago. How did the world begin? What was the cause? Who was the cause? A couple of weeks ago, I had the most interesting conversation with my brother. Actually, it was more like a provoked conversation to help me begin this paper. I asked him, "Do you believe that there is a God? A God who is said to be creator of all things, the one responsible for life and everything that happens to it? A being so mighty and great?" Of course, like he and any ot ...
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  • History Of Physics - 1,315 words
    History Of Physics Physics began when man first started to study his surroundings. Early applications of physics include the invention of the wheel and of primitive weapons. The people who built Stone Henge had knowledge of physical mechanics in order to move the rocks and place them on top of each other. It was not until during the period of Greek culture that the first systematic treatment of physics started with the use of mechanics. Thales is often said to have been the first scientist, and the first Greek philosopher. He was an astronomer, merchant and mathematician, and after visiting Egypt he is said to have originated the science of deductive geometry. He also discovered theorems of ...
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  • Hunger And Poverty - 790 words
    Hunger And Poverty During the course of this particular essay, I will prove to you many points. Maybe not to the extreme that it will change ones thought processes on the subject of hunger and world poverty, but enough to form a distinction between moral obligation and moral capacity. What I will not mention is the fact that Peter Singers outdated material (1971), though thorough in the sense of supporting his view on hunger and world poverty as well as examining this school of thought, is unconvincing to say the least. As our recent past has shown us, using Somalia and Rwanda as models, no amount of money or time on earth can come between a civil war. Terrible things happen, innocent people ...
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