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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: thematic

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  • A Separate Peace Thematic Analysis - 765 words
    A Separate Peace - Thematic Analysis A Separate Peace - Thematic Analysis An analysis of John Knowles A Separate Peace brings up the theme of man's inhumanity to his fellow man. What makes this novel unique is that in protesting war, Knowles never overtly referred to the blood and gore of war; he showed the consequences of war, some paralleling the nature of war and some simply laying out how World War II affected noncombatants thousand miles away. There have been many books written about war, what happens, why it happens, and why wars should stop. Knowles explains through the life of Finny why war never will cease, with only one death in the entire book; a quiet one at that. When Gene is re ...
    Related: separate peace, thematic, thematic analysis, world peace, ideal society
  • A Thematic Analysis Of Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho - 1,465 words
    A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Arts- Movies A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho has been commended for forming the archetypical basis of all horror films that followed its 1960 release. The mass appeal that Psycho has maintained for over three decades can undoubtedly be attributed to its universality. In Psycho, Hitchcock allows the audience to become a subjective character within the plot to enhance the film's psychological effects for an audience that is forced to recognise its own neurosis and psychological inadequacies as it is comp  elled to identify, for varying lengths of time, with the contrasting personalities of the film's m ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, psycho, thematic, thematic analysis
  • Affliction - 881 words
    Affliction The character Wade Whitehouse from the book Affliction by Russell Banks is very complex. To properly analyze his character one must take into account all aspects of his personality. We must search and break down any information we may find about, the characters background information, describe his personality, determine if any changes have occurred to his character during the novel, how he has affected fellow characters and finally the thematic significance that the author wishes to bring to the readers attention through his character. Firstly we must look at the major factors that influence the character; background information surrounding the environmental factors of the town, t ...
    Related: early life, new hampshire, self image, flow, heat
  • America Land Of The Free And Home Of The Brave The Utopian Society Which Every European Citizen Desired To Be A Part Of In Th - 3,093 words
    ... two boys are collecting supplies for Toms gang is another example of Toms conformity to society. Huck Fink has been taught by Pap to simply "borrow" things. Tom could not stand to do this. When Tom and Huck take the candles from Miss Watson, "Tom laid five cents on the table for pay" where Huck would have simply "borrowed" them (HF 6). This shows the striking contrast of the two characters and their views of the world. Tom Sawyer also represents the cruelties and evils that characters such as Pap and the Grangerfords displayed. In his discussion of the cruelties of the society that Huck finds himself in, Cox states that "all the other cruelties are committed for some reason for honor, m ...
    Related: america, american society, brave, citizen, southern society, utopian, utopian society
  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,340 words
    Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams, including A Streetcar Named Desire (1947, film, 1951) and Death of a Salesman (1949). He directed the Academy Award-winning films Gentleman's Agreement (1947) and On The Waterfront (1954), as well as East of Eden (1955), A Face in the Crowd (1957), Splendor in the Grass (1961), and The Last Tycoon (1976). His two autobiographical novels, America, America (1962) and The Arrangement (1967), were turned into films in 1963 and 1968. Bibliography: Koszarski, Richard, Hollywood Directors, 1941-1976 (1977). Jolson, Al -------------------------------- (johl'-suhn) The singer Al Jolson, b. Asa Yoelson in Lithuania, c.1886, d. Oct. 23, 1950, immigrated with his fa ...
    Related: arthur, arthur miller, miller, named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • Authorship Theory - 1,081 words
    Authorship Theory For a host of persuasive but commonly disregarded reasons, the Earl of Oxford has quietly become by far the most compelling man to be found behind the mask of Shake-speare. As Orson Welles put it in 1954, I think Oxford wrote Shakespeare. If you don't agree, there are some awful funny coincidences incidences to explain away. Some of these coincidences are obscure, others are hard to overlook. A 1578 Latin encomium to Oxford, for example, contains some highly suggestive praise: Pallas lies concealed in thy right hand, it says. Thine eyes flash fire; Thy countenance shakes spears. Elizabethans knew that Pallas Athena was known by the sobriquet the spear-shaker. The hyphen in ...
    Related: authorship, christopher marlowe, edmund spenser, common sense, theater
  • Authorship Theory - 1,152 words
    ... mbling, royal adviser Lord Burghley (nicknamed Polus), as the officious, bumbling royal adviser Polonius. The parallels between Burghley and Polonius are so vast and detailed that even the staunch Stratfordian A. L. Rowse admitted that there is nothing original anymore in asserting this widely recognized connection. Furthermore, like Polonius, Burghley had a daughter. At age twenty-one, Oxford was married to Anne Cecil, and their nuptial affairs were anything but blissful. The tragically unstable triangle of Hamlet-Ophelia-Polonius found its living parallel in Oxford-Anne-Polus. In short, from the profound (Oxford's mother quickly remarried upon the untimely death of her husband) to the ...
    Related: authorship, human freedom, life story, henry iv, boar
  • Betham - 1,157 words
    Betham The story of Doctor Faustus is a familiar myth, in which the main character sells his soul , makes a deal with the devil, for something he speciously holds more valuable. There are many versions of this story in our culture, and it would take quite a time to make note of them all. Most people will have seen or heard one of the various stories in the for of a book, play, movie, or television show. The original story of Doctor Faustus, as created by Christopher Marlow, was prevalent to society at the time because it spoke to people's growing dizzy awareness of their possibilities and capabilities at this time. By that explanation it seems that the classic Marlow play, Doctor Faustus, wo ...
    Related: marilyn monroe, main character, power over, persona, societal
  • Bicycle Thief - 1,592 words
    Bicycle Thief "The Bicycle Thief" is a deeply moving neo-realist study of post-War Italy which depicts one mans loss of faith and his struggle to maintain personal dignity in poverty and bureaucratic indifference. Antonio Ricci is a bill-poster whose bicycle, essential for his job, is stolen by a thief. Joined by his son Bruno, Antonio vainly searches for his bike, eventually resorting to the humiliation of theft himself. Throughout this paper, I will attempt to trace the character through "The Bicycle Thief." The film opens with a montage of early morning urban activities ending on a crowd of unemployed laborers clamoring for work. Sitting to the side is Antonio Ricci. Beaten down by despai ...
    Related: bicycle, thief, loving husband, central theme, shave
  • Big Lebowski - 676 words
    Big Lebowski The Big Lebowski According to Robert B. Ray's "The Thematic Paradigm," classical Hollywood develops "character(s that) magically embody diametrically opposite traits (299)." This method is used to appeal to "a collective American imagination steeped in myths of inclusiveness (299)." In other words, characters that portray a wide variety of traits, in many cases opposite traits, appeal to the American audience by embodying a portion of each viewer in the character. This method is clearly portrayed through the characters in the movie, "The Big Lebowski." "The Big Lebowski," is about "The Dude" (Jeff Bridges), a down-and-out, unemployed drifter who is still living in the haze of th ...
    Related: los angeles, american psychological, angeles county, alley, missing
  • Black Boy And Their Eyes Were Watching God - 1,878 words
    Black Boy And Their Eyes Were Watching God I. Abstract This paper examines the drastic differences in literary themes and styles of Richard Wright and Zora Neale Hurston, two African--American writers from the early 1900's. The portrayals of African-American women by each author are contrasted based on specific examples from their two most prominent novels, Native Son by Wright, and Their Eves Were Watching God by Hurston. With the intent to explain this divergence, the autobiographies of both authors (Black Boy and Dust Tracks on a Road) are also analyzed. Particular examples from the lives of each author are cited to demonstrate the contrasting lifestyles and experiences that created these ...
    Related: black boy, black woman, black women, most black, their eyes were watching god
  • Charles Dickens - 1,027 words
    ... utions, evinced most powerfully in Bleak House but reappearing consistently throughout his work, is based on the first-hand knowledge of them that he gained at the outset of his career. The world of Pickwick Papers, is not simply the world of Dingley Dell and Eatanswill, neither is its total effect as disjointed, as its loosely constructed technique would perhaps imply. The novel is given shape both by a subtle development in the character of Pickwick himself and by the way in which its thematic concerns, most notably in the sequence of events involving Pickwick and the law, have the common element of an attack on inhumanity and selfishness. As Pickwick becomes more deeply involved with ...
    Related: charles dickens, social change, old curiosity shop, legal process, rational
  • Child Development - 1,552 words
    Child Development Is development the result of genetics or the result of the love, guidance and the upbringing one receives? That is a very interesting and personal question. In reviewing Table 4.1 in the textbook regarding where the main developmental theories stand on the six themes in development, it appears that most of the theorists involved believe that both nature and nurture have an impact on the development of the child (Child Development: A Thematic Approach (3rd. ed.) (Bukato, Daehler, 1998, p.29). The Ethological theme reports that although behavior is biologically based the environment has an impact and influences behavior patterns. Most of the other themes such as the Learning ...
    Related: child protective, cognitive development, emotional development, intellectual development, language development
  • Composers Of 19th And 20th - 1,000 words
    ... will be the great Louis "Satchmo" Armstrong (1901 1971). Louis Daniel Armstrong was born in the Storyville District of New Orleans, Louisiana, on August 4, 1901, he always celebrated his birth as July 4, 1900 because that is what he was told and that is what he believed. His real date of birth was not known until after his death July 6, 1971. Mr. Armstrongs style of music was New Orleans Style Jazz. Some of his influences include his family, Peter Davis, and Joe "King" Oliver. Some notable history pertaining to Mr. Armstrong is that he came from a crime-ridden community. He was arrested at thirteen for firing a gun in the air at a New Years Celebration, and then was virtually saved by ...
    Related: king oliver, adolescent boys, west side, history, accidentally
  • Democratic Ecohumanism, Market Civilization - 1,363 words
    ... ntal/ humanistic dichotomy in order to realize the essential interconnectedness of these two arenas, so that when Shiva describes the over fishing of the shrimp beds off of the coast of India, we are reminded that the costs are equally felt in the environment and the dissolution of local fishing cultures. (Shiva, 37-54) Because the priorities of the market, (namely continuous development and wealth generation for the small minority which sits atop the neo-liberal hierarchy), are radically opposed to eco-humanistic ideal which we can assume are basically shared by the resource-poor majority of the world, the neo-liberal system is forced to manufacture consent in a manner that Gill finds e ...
    Related: civilization, market, market economy, money supply, american system
  • Emotions - 1,124 words
    ... unishment was not something I chose to use as part of parenting techniques. Instead I chose to use discipline (on most good parenting days!) Discipline means to teach. It should be a positive way of helping and guiding children to achieve self-control, self-esteem and confidence. Children need discipline for many reasons some of that are protection, to get along with others, and to understand limits. Discipline helps children understand the logical consequences of their actions and learn common rules that everyone must live by. It can help teach a child values that are held by the family and community. "The purpose of discipline, then, is to teach children acceptable behavior so that the ...
    Related: cognitive processing, self esteem, problem solve, suicide, hamilton
  • Explication: Ballad Of Birmingham - 945 words
    Explication: Ballad Of Birmingham Explication: "Ballad of Birmingham" In the poem "Ballad of Birmingham", by Dudley Randall, many different things can be analyzed. The difference in the two translations; one being a literal translation, telling the true meaning of the poem, and the other being a thematic translation, which tells the author's theme and symbolism used in his/her work. Another thing that all poets have in common is the usage of poetic devices; such as similes, metaphors, and personification. Before translations and devices, readers should first acknowledge the structure of the poem. In structure there are 8 different topics: speaker, setting, occasion, tone, rhyme, meter, numbe ...
    Related: ballad, birmingham, true meaning, modern english, sacred
  • Flowers - 1,888 words
    Flowers For Algernon By Keyes Test and Key 1. Where is this story set? Future, in western Europe or North America 2. How old are Charlie and Miss Kinnian? 37, and 34. 3. What was the first test Charlie did, and what was it for/ What did Charlie call it? A Rorschach test, which asks the patient to say what he/she thinks of inkblots on cards. This test is to determine if Charlie is intelligent or truly retarded. Charlie called it a raw shok test. 4. How did Charlie do on the test, and why is it important? He sees no inkblots, showing that he has very little advanced thinking. He has little imagination. His brain can't do much difficult thinking, proving that he is "dumb" enough for the test. 5 ...
    Related: flowers for algernon, mentally retarded, western europe, north america, spite
  • French New Wave - 1,238 words
    French New Wave The French New Wave was a movement that lasted between 1959 to 1964. It all started with the Cinematheque Francois, an underground organization that would regularly show older films from around the world. This beget the cine-club, and by the 1954 there were 100,000 members in 200 clubs. From these clubs several magazines were created, the most famous of these were LEcran Francois, La Revue du Cinema, Postif, and the world known Cahiers du Cinema. One of the two most influential people during this time was Alexandre Astruc who declared that, the cinema is becoming a means of expression like the other arts before it, especially painting and the novel. It is no longer a spectacl ...
    Related: wave, german expressionism, love story, francois truffaut, nazi
  • Geographic Information Systems - 1,636 words
    Geographic Information Systems Geographic information systems (GIS) technology can be used for scientific investigations, resource management, and development planning. For example, a GIS might allow emergency planners to easily calculate emergency response times and effected areas of the ocean during an oil spill based on the spills location. You may ask, what is GIS? In the strictest sense, a GIS is a computer system capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations. Practitioners also regard the total GIS as including operating personnel and the data that go into the system. A geographic in ...
    Related: computer system, geographic, information systems, oil spill, emergency response
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