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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: theater

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  • According To Aristotle, A Tragedy Is A Form Of Theater That Replicates A Solemn Action With The Intention Of Stirring Dread A - 1,073 words
    According to Aristotle, a tragedy is a form of theater that replicates a solemn action with the intention of stirring dread and sympathy in the viewer. Sophocles Antigone and Arthur Millers All My Sons both fit into this category. Both stories consist of a tragic hero, Creon and Joe Keller in this instance. According to Aristotles Poetics, a tragic hero is someone not all good or all bad, and whose downfall is caused by a tragic flaw or "hamartia". Later the hero comes to a realization of their flaw, which usually comes too late for them to redeem themselves. Creon and Keller are both tragic heroes that fit into Aristotles model, whose downfall is caused by greed, excessive pride and a belat ...
    Related: dread, intention, solemn, theater, tragedy
  • Ancient Greek Theater And Drama - 1,400 words
    Ancient Greek Theater And Drama Ancient Greek Theater and Drama Ancient Greek Theater and Drama Jennifer Mills Theater has been an integral part of almost every society for thousands of years. Starting in the last Sixth century B.C. Theater has been evolving into the glitzy, whirlwind productions of today. But in the beginning, theater was a simple affair. Originating in Greece, theater tradition was derived from religious rituals. The ceremonies of the cult of Dionysus were exuberant; much story telling took place in the form of song and dance. Everyone would partake in the story telling, forming what is known as the chorus. The first man to step out of the chorus and take a role of a chara ...
    Related: drama, greek, greek theater, theater, excellent education
  • Canevin Theater - 727 words
    Canevin Theater Canevin Catholic High School offers many extra curricular activities. Those students geared toward the physical challenges may choose from various athletic programs such as, basketball, soccer, and football. On the other hand, there are additional activities for those more interested in a mental challenge. These students may join such organizations anywhere from FBLA to Forensics. However, of all the extra curricular activities offered by Canevin, none excites me more than Dramatics. This paper takes a look at my last three years involvement in the annual musical productions here at Canevin. Traditionally, Canevin's dramatics has been a full-scale musical production performed ...
    Related: theater, main character, fair lady, freshman year, innovative
  • Elizabethan Theater - 1,251 words
    Elizabethan Theater Drama changed literature and theater into what it is today. I. History of Elizabethan Theater a. forming of theater 1. medieval church 2. mystery and morality b. actors 1. rogues and thieves 2. acting guilds II. Influences and people a. commanding actors 1. Shakespeare 2. Burbage b. other 1. wars of the roses (other historical influences) 2. laws restricting theater III. The theaters a. prices 1. seating 2. stage b. the theater and the globe 1. locations and characteristics 2. Burbage and other accomplishment Elizabethan Drama During the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, England underwent a dramatic change in priorities. The importance of art and literature became highly preval ...
    Related: elizabethan, elizabethan drama, elizabethan england, elizabethan era, theater
  • Globe Theater - 1,628 words
    Globe Theater "A seventeenth century English theatre in Southwark, London"(). Also known, as an Elizabethan theatre was most notable for the initial and contemptuous productions of the dramatic works of English writers, William Shakespeare, Ben Johnson, Beaumont and Fletcher, and others. "In 1576, a carpenter named James Burbage built the first theatre in England, which he called, simply, The Theatre, the first time the word was used to refer to a building specifically designed for the staging of plays"(). It was built in partnership with Shakespeare and others. It was constructed in the Renaissance era, and drew very large crowds. Due to its advancements in technology, props, and its use of ...
    Related: globe, globe theater, globe theatre, theater, william shakespeare
  • Greek And Roman Theater - 1,604 words
    Greek And Roman Theater Greek and Roman Theater The Greeks in Athens built the worlds first theater about 550 BC The worlds first theater production was performed by the Greeks. The Greeks were the first people to create theater performances. The Romans borrowed Greek ideas to create their own productions. There are many differences between the early Greek plays and the early Roman plays, there are also many similarities. The early plays by Greeks were tragedies consisted of acted episodes performed by one actor who also conversed with the leader of the chorus. During this action, chorus members would react in pattern movements and gestures to what was happening. Early Greek tragedies became ...
    Related: early greek, greek, greek / roman, greek civilization, greek comedy, greek roman, greek theater
  • I Have Had Many Theaterrelated Experiences Every Chapter That I Have Read In My Theater Book Has Allowed Me To Make A Connect - 1,356 words
    I have had many theater-related experiences. Every chapter that I have read in my theater book has allowed me to make a connection to my past experiences with theater performances. I have also seen many plays and could relate to things an audience sees by reading the book. My first theater experience ever is when I was in the Nutcracker. We did a ballet performance for this play. I was very young when I did this, but I remember my instructor always saying that we must make contact with our audience through movements. Since in ballet you can not talk, you have to express the emotions that you are feeling to the audience through movement. This was very difficult. I must say that acting with wo ...
    Related: connect, theater, work experience, high school, biggest challenge
  • Imagine Yourself In The Globe Theater, Watching The Opening To Shakespeares New Play Julius Caesar You Are In The Standing Pi - 586 words
    Imagine yourself in the Globe Theater, watching the opening to Shakespeare's new play Julius Caesar. You are in the standing pit because you do not have any money. The play begins. The drool starts to run from the commoner's mouths. The play is very intense. Oh my gosh! Caesar was just killed. The blood it looks so real. Brutus what have you done. Brutus you are a hero. Brutus is scum. Long live Antony. Antony praises Brutus for his morals, for he was the only one in the conspiracy that was in it for the good of the people and not himself. You and your friends go back to your shack to evaluate the leadership roles of Brutus, Caesar, and Antony. Brutus has displayed his leadership role though ...
    Related: caesar, globe, globe theater, julius, julius caesar
  • Queen Elizabeths Lasting Effect On Theater - 1,911 words
    Queen Elizabeths Lasting Effect On Theater Queen Elizabeth came to be known as one of the greatest rulers of the English empire. Under the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, a more efficient government was created. The church was unified, the English empire was expanded, and language, literature, and theater flourished to a greatness that would be impossible for almost any other period of English history, or any other European empire, for that matter, to match. Although there was a great rise in literature,it was theater that catapulted to greatness during Elizabeth's reign. Out of Elizabeth's era came Elizabethan theater. Elizabethan theater has such a variety of topics, that would make it virtual ...
    Related: globe theater, lasting, queen, queen anne, queen elizabeth, theater, theater arts
  • Rodgers And Hammerstein: Changin Musical Theater History - 1,324 words
    Rodgers And Hammerstein: Changin Musical Theater History There are many well-known lyricists and composers, but only a few leave such a mark as Rodgers and Hammerstein. This duo produced nine musical plays during their partnership and caused a profound change in musical comedy. They set the standards that are followed to this day in musical history. They created the modern musical that we all know and love. Before they became Rodgers and Hammerstein, they were simply Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, both of New York City. Hammerstein, born in 1895, was brought up in a theatrical family. His father was an operatic impresario, otherwise known as an opera director or manager. He built ...
    Related: history, musical, rodgers, theater, yale university
  • Shakespeare And His Theater - 564 words
    Shakespeare and his Theater Compared to the technical theaters of today, the London public theaters in the time of Queen Elizabeth I seem to be terribly limited. The plays had to be performed during daylight hours only and the stage scenery had to be kept very simple with just a table, a chair, a throne, and maybe a tree to symbolize a forest. Many say that these limitations were in a sense advantages. What the theater today can show for us realistically, with massive scenery and electric lighting, Elizabethan playgoers had to imagine. This made the playwright have to write in a vivid language so the audience could understand the play. Not having a lighting technician to work the control pan ...
    Related: globe theater, shakespeare, theater, thames river, romeo and juliet
  • The Globe Theater - 630 words
    The Globe Theater The Globe Theater changed the course of English Theater forever. The Globe broke rules of ownership, class standards, and promoted the greatest playwright ever, William Shakespeare. Throughout its history the Globe Theater has produced the best of Shakespeare and his amazing plays and when it was closed London never felt the same. But once again Shakespeare is upon us. The newly re-built Globe gives us one more chance to re-live Shakespeares plays. Through examining the history and collapse of the Globe Theater one can see how it has come to its recent re-birth, and that it is here to stay. The Globe Theater was opened in London in 1599. James Burbage, half owner of the the ...
    Related: globe, globe theater, theater, henry viii, works cited
  • The Greek Theater - 606 words
    The Greek Theater The Greek Theater "The arts of the western world have been largely dominated by the artistic standards established by the Greeks of the classical period" (Spreloosel 86). It is from the Greek word theatron, meaning a place for sitting, that we get our word theater. According to James Butler, "The Greeks were the first people to erect special structures to bring audiences and theatrical performers together" (27). "The theaters were normally located near a populated area at the bottom of or cut out of a carefully selected, sloping hillside overlooking a seascape, a plain, or a city" (Butler 30). "They eventually with few exceptions consisted of three distinct parts: theatron ...
    Related: greek, greek theater, theater, works cited, dressing room
  • The Group Theater - 1,563 words
    The Group Theater The Group Theatre began as a small company that provided actors and actresses with a means and a location to practice plays. Three people, Harold Clurman, Lee Strasberg, and Cheryl Crawford formed The Group Theatre. The Group Theatre escalated in 1931 and ended abruptly in 1941 prevailing through the years there were hits, periods of flops, financial straits, depressing inactivity, and spiraling to as glittering of a success as any on Broadway. This story however is also the story of growth and development throughout American cultural life in the thirties. The year is 1928, and the tedious beginning of The Group Theatre began when Harold Clurman answered the call of a real ...
    Related: theater, state university, britannica online, online encyclopedia, brookfield
  • Theater - 507 words
    Theater Theater Greek Theater Although theaters developed in many parts of Greece, it was in Athens, where the most dramatic styles the world has known was formed. Ancient Greek theaters were built in natural open air sites on conveniently shaped hills. This allowed a great mass of people to enjoy a show at one time(The Ephesus could hold 56,000 people) Unlike later dramas, which could be endlessly duplicated, Greek manuscripts existed as a single, fragile piece. Many of them have been destroyed over time, and the few that have survived are treasured, and said to be priceless. Due to the immense size of the audience, actors placed emphasis on exaggerated action and speech. And, colourful sym ...
    Related: greek theater, theater, real life, over time, comical
  • Theater And Drama In Ancient Greece Took Form In About 5th - 1,243 words
    Theater and drama in Ancient Greece took form in about 5th century BCE, with the Sopocles, the great writer of tragedy. In his plays and those of the same genre, heroes and the ideals of life were depicted and glorified. It was believed that man should live for honor and fame, his action was courageous and glorious and his life would climax in a great and noble death. Originally, the hero's recognition was created by selfish behaviors and little thought of service to others. As the Greeks grew toward city-states and colonization, it became the destiny and ambition of the hero to gain honor by serving his city. The second major characteristic of the early Greek world was the supernatural. The ...
    Related: ancient greece, drama, greece, theater, early greek
  • Theater And Drama In Ancient Greece Took Form In About 5th - 1,176 words
    ... This was called "deus ex machina", which means god from the machine, and was a technical device that used a metal crane on top of the skene building, which contained the dressing rooms, from which a dummy was suspended to represent a god. This device was first employed by Euripides to give a miraculous conclusion to a tragedy. In later romantic literature, this device was no longer used and the miracles supplied by it were replace by the sudden appearance of a rich uncle, the discovery or new wills, or of infants changed at birth. Many proprieties of the Greek plays were attached to violence. Therefore, it was a rule that acts of violence must take place off stage. This carried through ...
    Related: ancient greece, drama, greece, greek theater, theater
  • Theater Experience - 631 words
    Theater Experience Ok, so the only reason I joined theater class was because I needed an easy A. A blow-off class of some sort, to balance out the rest of my schedule. I got much more than that. I am taking with me a sense of self-worth, and confidence. I acquired the ability to think on my feet, and the motivation to get up and do something when faced with a new situation, not just giggle and turn red. The biggest thing, I think, is the ability to just talk to people and not be worried about what they think. After all, I cant be embarrassed after I think about some of the stuff that I did this year in front of the class. I found that I can go ahead and talk to someone I dont know, instead o ...
    Related: theater, theater arts, high school, past years, riding
  • Theater Free Term Papers, Book Reports, Essays, And Research - 1,253 words
    - Theater Free Term Papers, Book Reports, Essays, And Research Romeo And Juliet : Shakespeare And The Use Of Farce By Jackie Harry Sensuality was a favorite theme of William Shakespeare. Unfortunately, Romeo And Juliet is absolutely witless in terms of Shakespeare's usual conservative politics. In this paper, I will show that Romeo And Juliet is the most brilliant example of reactionary writing ever created. This claim is buttressed by three points: (1) the Surrealist theme of loss of innocence in Romeo And Juliet, (2) Shakespeare's adversarial relationship to the Symbolist school while writing the book, and (3) the author's brave employment of sensuality depite the influence of the Modernis ...
    Related: book reports, theater, t. s. eliot, gustave flaubert, master
  • Theater History - 518 words
    Theater History European Theater diminished drastically during the Middle Ages. This was due to the harshness of living during these times. The common people were tillers of the soil, unlearned, with short life spans. The Roman Catholic Church had considerable power. The church has never been a big supporter of things theatrical. But some primitive types of Theater did emerge in this time. The scop was found in the Germanic or Teutonic territories. The scop was a singer and storyteller who would tell about ancient heroes of that land. He would perform at banquets and was given a social status. These scops would give the desolate people a way to reconnect with a more prosperous time. We see t ...
    Related: history, theater, native americans, mardi gras, annual
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