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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: the odyssey

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  • Early In The Odyssey We See Telemakhos As A Rash, Untrained Boy He Clearly Is Not Odysseus Equal As A Host, Leader, Or Fighte - 715 words
    Early in the Odyssey we see Telemakhos as a rash, untrained boy. He clearly is not Odysseus' equal as a host, leader, or fighter. However, as the book goes on we see Telemakhos become more and more like his father, in every respect as he is taught and guided by some of the best examples he could have, Athena, Nestor, and Menelaos. By the end of the fight with the suitors we see him in a new light, he has matured from the youth we saw to the man he should be. Telemakhos tries to emulate his father to the best of his ability, striving to be a good host as he did with Mentor. He succeeds more than we expect him to, for though he has had very bad examples to look up to for the last four years, h ...
    Related: odysseus, odyssey, telemakhos, the odyssey, untrained
  • Odysseus, The Hero The Odyssey Is An Epic Story That Has Been A Significant Piece Of Literature Since It Wasfirst Composed An - 414 words
    Odysseus, the Hero The Odyssey is an epic story that has been a significant piece of literature since it wasfirst composed and will remain so for ages to come. One of the reasons it has been so isbecause of the hero, Odysseus. Odysseus is one of the first Greek mythic heroes renowned for his brain as well as hismuscle. He is a man with an intelligent mind, and he is also a man with outstandingbravery. I also must not forget that he is a top-notch athlete which only adds more to thisseemingly insuperable character. It is no wonder why many people refer to Odysseus as apowerful mythic hero.Odysseus often hesitates before acting, because he uses his reason and gift to evaluatethings. This patie ...
    Related: epic, literature, odyssey, the odyssey, carried away
  • Penelopes Role In The Odyssey - 1,092 words
    Penelope's Role In The Odyssey The character of Penelope in Homer's Odyssey reflects the faithful wife who waits twenty years for the arrival of her husband. Only a strong woman could sustain the stress, anxiety and confusion resulting from the chaos of a palace with a missing king whose fate is unknown. Her responsibilities and commitments toward the man she loves are particularly difficult to keep, under the strain of the situation. Although she does not actively pursue an effort to find him, her participation in the success of Odysseus' homecoming can be seen in her efforts to defend and protect the heritage, reputation and the House of Odysseus in his absence. As Odysseus withstands his ...
    Related: odyssey, the odyssey, short story, young woman, usual
  • Role Of Women In The Odyssey - 693 words
    Role Of Women In The Odyssey The Role of Women in The Odyssey Women form an important part of the folk epic, written by Homer, The Odyssey. Within the story there are three basic types of women: the goddess, the seductress, and the good hostess/wife. Each role adds a different element and is essential to the telling of the story. The role of the goddess is one of a supernatural being, but more importantly one in a position to pity and help mortals. Athena, the goddess of wisdom, is the most prominent example of the role; in the very beginning of the story she is seen making a plea for Odysseus' return home, and throughout the first half of the book she assists him in his journey. She is the ...
    Related: odyssey, the odyssey, trojan war, virtuous woman, woman
  • The Journey Of Odysseus And Telemachos In The Odyssey Written By Homer And Translated By Richard Lattimore, Several Themes Ar - 1,271 words
    The Journey of Odysseus and Telemachos In The Odyssey written by Homer and translated by Richard Lattimore, several themes are made evident, conceived by the nature of the time period, and customs of the Greek people. These molded and shaped the actual flow of events and outcomes of the poem. Beliefs of this characteristic were represented by the sheer reverence towards the gods and the humanities the Greek society exhibited, and are both deeply rooted within the story. In the intricate and well-developed plot of The Odyssey, Homer harmonized several subjects. One of these, was the quest of Telemachos, (titled "Telemachy") in correlation with the journey of his father. In this, he is develop ...
    Related: homer, odysseus, odyssey, the odyssey, trojan war
  • The Journey Of Odysseus And Telemachos In The Odyssey Written By Homer And Translated By Richard Lattimore, Several Themes Ar - 1,254 words
    ... e makes it clear to the suitors (robbing his home and proposing marriage to his mother Penelope) that he wants them all out of his house. He then requested a ship and twenty men, and sailed off to the Island of Pylos. There he was immediately greeted by Nestor, in the middle of offering 81 bulls to Poseidon. Peisistratos, son of Nestor, then offered some intestines to Telemachos and Athene as far as sacrificing it in hopes of a safe journey. This was ironic since in reality, Athene was controlling his journey, and on the other hand, moments ago, Poseidon, was in fact destroying the journey of his father. Nestor, once seeing that his guests were finished feasting, asked of their identitie ...
    Related: homer, odysseus, odyssey, the odyssey, trojan war
  • The Odyssey - 990 words
    The Odyssey In The Odyssey, the act of storytelling plays a significant role in revealing the story of Odysseus. Each storyteller reveals a part of the past of Odysseus and his heroic deeds. Each of their stories gives insight into what a hero should be, according to the standards of the Greek society, and they each reflect a different aspect of a hero. When pieced together, each story becomes part of a whole, however, each has a different function within the epic. Some may not contribute to the hero directly, but teach a moral or lesson to the audience listening to the story. The audience directed towards is the Greek society and the morals are taught by storytelling. By using storytelling, ...
    Related: odyssey, the odyssey, years away, peace and war, fatal
  • The Odyssey - 1,019 words
    ... . Throughout the story, the crew perpetually disobeys the instructions of Odysseus. For example, when the Odysseus and his men defeated Ismaros, the men stayed on the island to revel in their victory, although Odysseus exhorts them to leave the island. As a result, the people of Ismaros attacked the men and more lives were lost. Another example of this behavior is in Book X, when the Odysseus and his crew land of Aeolus, who holds control of the winds. Odysseus is welcomed there and showered with gifts by Aeolus. Aeolus also gives him a sack containing strong winds, except for the West Wind. The crew then sets sail back to Ithaca. After ten days, when the ship is nearly home to Ithaca, O ...
    Related: odyssey, the odyssey, important role, west wind, clever
  • The Odyssey - 746 words
    The Odyssey The Odyssey, written by Homer, is the story of Odysseus and how he faced misfortune in his attempts to return home after the Trojan war. From these misfortunes he learned to be a better man and became able to regain his place in his homeland of Ithaca. During his journeys Odysseus often makes the mistake of staying to boast to his enemies but learns that doing so gives his opposition a chance to seek retribution against him. After leaving Troy Odysseus attacks the land of the Cicones. Instead of leaving after his victory, he stays to celebrate until a force is rallied against him and he must flee with many casualties. Afterwards Odysseus and his crew land on the island of the Cyc ...
    Related: odyssey, the odyssey, trojan war, the monster, gale
  • The Odyssey - 615 words
    The Odyssey The Odyssey The great muses are called upon by Homer to tell the great adventure of Odysseus in his travel back to his home. Prayers are given to the Greek Gods and muses by Homer in order to proceed this story. The Greeks life revolved around the gods in a matter of fashion as we presently revolve around Christianity. The depiction of the roles the gods played in the Odyssey is both presented in good and evil. The Greeks portrayed their gods as powerful and merciful. However in the Odyssey the gods play a role in a savior like Jesus Christ and the tormentor like Satan. With the present role in the story of Odyssey the gods can be seen as a key role in Odysseus life. Odysseus alo ...
    Related: odyssey, the odyssey, jesus christ, greek gods, travel
  • The Odyssey Is An Epic Poem, Which Revolves Around Odysseus And His Journey Home From The War At Troy Throughout His Travels - 1,065 words
    The Odyssey is an epic poem, which revolves around Odysseus and his journey home from the war at Troy. Throughout his travels he is met with many obstacles and adventures. There are times when he thinks he will never make it home. But through perseverance, faith, maturation and heroics, he manages to survive and reach his homeland of Ithaca as a changed man. In The Odyssey, Odysseus, the main character must journey from Troy to his homeland of Ithaca. Throughout this journey he learns many lessons, faces obstacles testing his physical and mental strength and grows from an arrogant, self-centered hero into a humble, respectful survivor. With the help of the Gods he is finally able to return t ...
    Related: epic, odysseus, odyssey, odyssey odysseus, the odyssey, troy
  • The Odyssey Vs The Aeneid - 1,030 words
    The Odyssey Vs. The Aeneid Comparisons: The Odyssey Vs. The Aeneid Virgil was a creative genius from his time, but it can be understandable that many of his works may have been influenced from previous works of literacy. A comparison of Virgils, The Aeneid, and Homers, The Odyssey, will help to show the different aspects of Roman and Greek cultures. It will also help to illustrate the effects the Greeks had on Roman culture. There are many differences and likenesses between these two epics. Greek culture and literature had a great dominating influence over Roman life, therefore, the influence of style and the stories written by Virgil adopted many of the old Greek ways. However, Virgil did n ...
    Related: aeneid, odyssey, odyssey odysseus, the odyssey, human nature
  • The Odyssey: The Role Of Prophecy - 1,529 words
    The Odyssey: The Role Of Prophecy When one ponders the Greek mythology and literature, powerful images invariably come to mind. One relives the heroes struggles against innumerable odds, their battles against magical monsters, and the gods periodic intervention in mortal affairs. Yet, a common and often essential portion of a heroic epic is the heros consultation with an oracle or divinity. This prophecy is usually critical to the plot line, and also to the well being of the main characters. Could Priam have survived in the Achaean camp if not at the gods instruction (200-201)? Could the Argos have run the gauntlet of the Prowling Rocks if not for the gods advice of using a sacrificial bird ...
    Related: important role, prophecy, world masterpieces, norton company, suit
  • A Reputation Contradicted - 1,332 words
    A Reputation Contradicted A Reputation Contradicted To many, a hero is someone who saves something or someone else. Although Odysseus seems to be the hero in Homers The Odyssey, his name problematizes the nature of his heroism, and ultimately, of his identity. In Greek, the proper noun Odysseus also functions as a verb meaning to be against or to oppose. Paradoxically, then, the protagonist of The Odyssey is also an antagonist; the hero is also the character responsible for causing the greatest harm. When Odysseus leaves Ithaka to fight in the Battle of Troy, he does more intimate damage than he will ever realize until he returns to find his home in a state of chaos and subsequent destructio ...
    Related: reputation, growing old, different forms, the odyssey, verb
  • Alvar Nunez Cabeza De Vaca - 1,274 words
    Alvar Nunez Cabeza De Vaca Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca Most peoples' exposure to world history is limited to several classes in school and action films. This creates an aura of glamour and excitement, which is far from the reality that conquistadors such as Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca experienced. In light of the intolerable hardships that many of these early explorers were forced to endure, what motivated men like de Vaca to join such perilous adventures? Cabeza de Vaca's life and journey to North America are intriguing because through his extended encounters with the Native Americans he became known as the compassionate conquistador. Cabeza de Vaca was born in 1490 to Spanish nobility; his a ...
    Related: cabeza, vaca, york london, charles scribner, respond
  • Anti War Themes In Catch 22 Slaughter House Five And Night - 1,288 words
    ... he landed a contract with the Germansto bomb his own outfit (Heller 267). The whole base was destroyed; Milo was forgiven soon after the bombing because he told the soldiers how much money he had made for them. After reading this section one is appalled at the inhumanity exhibited by the characters in the book. The theme of inhumanity is evident throughout the rest of the book; many of the characters display this theme through their inhumane actions. The anti-war theme in the book Catch-22 is perpetuated by the satiric lack of rationality all the characters, except for Yossarian, have. Yossarian is one of the few sane people in the book. Throughout the book, the repetition of ridiculous ...
    Related: catch, catch 22, random house, slaughter, slaughter house
  • Apollo 13: A Successful Failure - 1,192 words
    ... t tank was leaking, apparently damaged by the blowout of tank No. 2, and the power was fading. Only the command module storage batteries were left in Apollo, and these would have to be used for reentry into Earth atmosphere. The lunar module was now the crew's only salvation. As the crew began moving into the Aquarius and shutting down the command module, navigators at Mission Control computed a new course that would swing the ship around the Moon and bring it back to Earth. At 2:43 a.m. CST, April 14th the crew made the first course correction. They had to fire the Lunar Modules engines for 30.7 seconds. This would increase the velocity 38 feet per second, which put the ship in a free r ...
    Related: apollo, indian ocean, north american, power supply, mission
  • Aristotle - 1,197 words
    Aristotle Aristotle was born in 384 BC.; with him came the birth of Western realism. He was a student of Plato and a tutor to Alexander the Great (Founders, 1991). It is difficult to discuss the philosophies of Aristotle without bringing up those of his former tutor, Plato. Aristotle's philosophies diverted from Plato's, and led to Aristotle forming his own school, the Lyceum. After tutoring Alexander the Great for about five years, he founded the Lyceum in Athens, Greece (Wheelwright, 1983). The Lyceum was a philosophical school that dealt in matters such as metaphysics, logic, ethics, and natural sciences. When teaching at the Lyceum, Aristotle had a habit of walking about as he discoursed ...
    Related: aristotle, state university, human experience, athens greece, attempting
  • Assistant By Malamuds - 465 words
    Assistant By Malamuds Throughout Bernard Malamuds, beautifully written, The Assistant there were references to cultural icons or to religious symbols that sometimes represent The writers major theme. In this book it is Franks constant resemblance to St. Francis Of Assisi, and Franks subtle conversion to Judaism. The most important religious symbol in the book is St. Francis. Frank Alpine's name two important connotations: It suggests an affinity with St. Francis of Assisi and also refers to mountain heights beyond the Timberline. Frank has vivid memories of learning about St. Francis. His desires to be like St. Francis emphasizes only one half of his divided character, because he is both a s ...
    Related: assistant, alter ego, good writing, the odyssey, religion
  • Athens And Sparta - 855 words
    Athens and Sparta Athens and Sparta The country of Greece in 400-500 B.C. was led to greatness by two great city-states. These city-states were Athens and Sparta. These two states were as different as night and day. They were rivals and very diverse. As you read you will find out their differences between their form of culture and government. The city-state of Athens adopted a form of government which is now called democracy. Democracy is when the government is ruled by the people. This government consisted of an assembly , a jury , and there was a council of 500 men over 30 . The council decided such matters as to declare war or to spend money. The council was used to make decisions for the ...
    Related: ancient athens, athens, sparta, the iliad, physical education
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