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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: the awakening

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  • Awakening - 652 words
    Awakening The Awakening by Kate Chopin was considered very shocking when it was first published because of the "sexual awakening" of the main character, Edna Pontellier, and her unconventional behavior. Chopin moved to New Orleans after her marriage and lived there for twelve years until the death of her husband. She returned to St. Louis where she began writing. She used her knowledge of Louisiana and Creole culture to create wonderful descriptions of local color, and she incorporated French phrases used by the Creoles. The Awakening begins at Grade Isle, a vacation spot of wealthy Creoles from New Orleans. Edna is there with her two sons and her husband Leonce who comes and goes because of ...
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  • Awakening And Suicide - 757 words
    Awakening And Suicide What is suicide? "(Suicide is) the act of self-destruction by a person sound in mind and capable of measuring his (or her) moral responsibility" (Webster 1705). "No one really knows why human beings commit suicide. Indeed, the very person who takes his (or her) own life may be least aware at the moment of decision of the essence of his (or her) reasons and emotions for doing so. At the outset, it can be said that a dozen individuals can kill themselves and "do" (or commit) 12 psychologically different deeds" (Encyclopaedia Britannica, 385). Suicide is written about in a variety of novels, short stories, and movies. Suicide moves like an undercurrent in the sea of themes ...
    Related: awakening, suicide, the awakening, encyclopaedia britannica, sylvan barnet
  • Awakening By Edna Pontellier - 1,092 words
    Awakening By Edna Pontellier There are many important paths that we must follow on our journey through life. We follow the path without questioning its intent. The path informs us when we should learn to talk, to walk, to marry, and to have children. We are told that we should never stray from it, because if we do, society will make it certain that we are bound for damnation. In the novel The Awakening the main character, Edna Pontellier, has followed this path without so much as a fuss. All that changes when Edna is awakened from a life long slumbera slumber, which she found repetitious, monotonous, and futile. She discovers that she is incomplete being just a wife and a mother. She needs t ...
    Related: awakening, edna, edna pontellier, pontellier, the awakening
  • Awakening By Kate Chopin - 407 words
    Awakening By Kate Chopin The book, The Awakening by Kate Chopin, is not so much a love story as it is a story of one woman. Mrs. Pontellier was a woman with emotional needs. Her needs include material, sexual, intimacy, and the need to be wanted or needed. Among Lonce Pontellier, Alce Arobin, and Robert Lebrun, she pursues and meets her needs. Although Lonce Pontellier didnt seem to play a part in her life, he did. He provided her materialistic needs. Just as she dreaded, he was her husband in the worlds eyes. It is plain to see that Edna finds marriage a revolting institution from this quote: Her marriage to Lonce Pontellier was purely an accident, in this respect resembling many other marr ...
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  • Awakening By Kate Chopin - 405 words
    Awakening By Kate Chopin American Lit. Professor Claire Berger Michael L. Cosby 2. Trace Edna Pontellier's awakening. Edna awakening comes very soon in the story, because first of all Edna never feels connect to the wealthy Creoles of New Orleans. The whole life style of the Creoles just never fits to her and the type of person she is. Then on vacation, Edna starts to fall for a man named, Robert Lebrun. The mean part of her awakening is when she's on the beach and she realizes that she's is an individual. With her new feelings she starts to spend more time on herself like learning how to swim and disregards her children. After Robert left, she finds two new friends as well as a new house. W ...
    Related: awakening, chopin, kate, kate chopin, the awakening
  • Awakening By Kate Chopin - 1,585 words
    Awakening By Kate Chopin "Every step which she took toward relieving herself from obligations added to her strength and expansion as an individual" (93) The Awakening by Kate Chopin introduces the reader to the life of Edna Pontellier, a woman with an independent nature, searching for her true identity in a patriarchal society that expects women to be nothing more than devoted wives and nurturing mothers. In this paper I will describe Ednas journey of self-discovery and explain why her struggle for independence is no easy task. I will also discuss the relationship Edna has with two other main women characters and describe how these women conform or rebel against a society with many social co ...
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  • Awakening By Kate Chopin Focus - 635 words
    Awakening By Kate Chopin Focus Kate Chopins novel The Awakening relates the emotion-driven story of Edna Pontellier. Her story is a happy one. Not because of some typical fairy tale ending where they all live happily ever after, but in that she accomplished her goal in life. She never "sacrificed herself for her children." (p. 115) Edna Pontellier remained an individual. The music that was brought to her by Mademoiselle Reisz stirred up a deeper meaning in Edna's life. This is the point at which she feels her new being forming. In the end, not only did she realized that her new life had no place in this world, but that she would be happier in the sea, where there were no restrictions placed ...
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  • Awakening By Kate Chopin Story - 743 words
    Awakening By Kate Chopin Story Throughout Kate Chopins, The Awakening, numerous scenes of birth and renewal are depicted. Various symbols placed throughout the book show Edna Pontelliers awakenings. For instance, many references are made to oceans and water. It is in the water that Edna has her first rebirth, but it is also the place where she chooses to die. Water symbolizes life, which is the reason that Ednas renewal takes place there, but it also symbolizes darkness and death. Birds, which are featured frequently in the story, symbolize Edna, and in many cases they foreshadow whats to become of her, or they show her renewal of life. The imagery of birds throughout the book is used to sym ...
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  • Awakening Eyes - 1,737 words
    Awakening Eyes Awakening Eyes With few exceptions, our male dominated society has traditionally feared, repressed, and stymied the growth of women. As exemplified in history, man has always enjoyed a superior position. According to Genesis in the Old Testament, the fact that man was created first has led to the perception that man should rule. However, since woman was created from man's rib, there is a strong argument that woman was meant to work along side with man as an equal partner. As James Weldon Johnson's poem, "Behold de Rib," clearly illustrates, if God had intended for woman to be dominated, then she would have been created from a bone in the foot, but "he took de bone out of his s ...
    Related: awakening, the awakening, their eyes were watching god, self determination, role model
  • Awakening To Freedom - 590 words
    Awakening To Freedom Jennifer Poisson Take-Home Essay Test En 262 05/02/2001 Awakening to Freedom Awakening or to awake means "to wake up; to be or make alert or watchful" (Webster 23). This is what Edna Pontellier experienced in The Awakening. There has been some discussion over the appropriateness of the ending to this story. Was it appropriate for Edna to commit suicide? Yes, this story of Edna Pontellier, including the ending, is appropriate to what a woman probably would have felt like if she were in that time feeling what Edna was feeling. Edna committed suicide because there was no other way out. She did not fit into society. Her thoughts and emotions were not the same as the thoughts ...
    Related: awakening, the awakening, edna pontellier, mademoiselle reisz, paint
  • Cathedral By Raymond Carvers - 1,236 words
    Cathedral By Raymond Carvers "For now we see through a glass darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then I shall know even as I am known" (1 Corinthians 13). The narrator of Raymond Carver's "Cathedral" is a man living a life of monotony, continuously feeding the cold and bigoted mind that we witness for the first part of the story. The process of guiding Robert through the drawing of the cathedral, removes the narrator from that dark looking glass and initiates a tranformation in which he is compelled to meet himself face to face; this awakening stirs the narrator's humility, imagination, and faith. It is human nature to embrace preconceptions regarding the facets of daily l ...
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  • Coming Out Of Gay Men And Lesbians - 1,147 words
    Coming Out Of Gay Men And Lesbians "Coming Out" of Gay Men and Lesbians "Coming out" is a means of identifying one's sexual orientation as gay, lesbian, or bisexual. At its most basic, "coming out of the closet," means being honest with those around you - friends, family, colleagues, and so forth - about your sexual orientation, about whom you are. It also means acknowledging one's sexual orientation to self. Such disclosure is an ongoing, lifelong process rather than a one-time event. New personal, social, and professional situations require gay men and lesbians to make decisions about the degree to which they can be open about their sexual orientation (Morrow, 1996). Sexual orientation is ...
    Related: mental health, identity development, psychological adjustment, abuse, turbulent
  • Desirees Baby - 1,509 words
    Desiree's Baby The 19th century was a difficult time for many women and blacks because of the domination of white men over them. The social and economic hardships they faced in day to day life was a constant reminder of this domination. The social ideology in the story "Desirees Baby" was powerful and dangerous and held no escape for any character. A woman with small children who lost her husband would face extreme hardships without the support of close family members. One who happened to be down on their luck would not find much sympathy among their peers even with children. Kate Chopin was one of these individuals who was down on her luck with six children. But fortunately had the support ...
    Related: social life, brief biography, kate chopin, mixed, infatuation
  • Dolls House - 900 words
    Doll`s House Ibsen is a writer that uses literature to channel entertainment and express himself throughout the play, "A Dolls House". He wrote the play during the transition from mythical and historical dramas to plays dealing with social problems. At the time that Ibsen wrote "A Dolls House", the later 1800s, society has created a niche for the woman as a housewife and social partner, lacking emphasis on love. This controversial play features a female protagonist seeking her individuality through realizations and challenging her comfort zone. Isben, through Nora and her personality, depicts the role of women not as the usual comforter, helper, and supporter of man, but introduced woman as ...
    Related: a doll's house, dolls house, the awakening, social problems, cheap
  • Edith Wharton And Kate Chopin - 738 words
    Edith Wharton And Kate Chopin The main characters depicted in both Edith Wharton's Ethan Frome and Kate Chopin's The Awakening undergo a personal struggle in their attempt to deal with the universal emotion of love. Ethan Frome and Edna Pontellier each are married, but in love with another person. During the time in which the stories take place it is socially unacceptable for them to divorce or have an affair; and both characters are aware of the views of society. Ethan and Edna are in situations that do not please them, and have an inner need or desire to be with someone else. Ethan Frome falls in love with his young servant, who is also his wife's cousin. Edna Pontellier is infatuated with ...
    Related: chopin, edith, edith wharton, kate, kate chopin, wharton
  • Edith Whartonkate Chopin - 746 words
    Edith Wharton+Kate Chopin American Lit. II Paper 2 2-17-2K The main characters depicted in both Edith Wharton's Ethan Frome and Kate Chopin's The Awakening undergo a personal struggle in their attempt to deal with the universal emotion of love. Ethan Frome and Edna Pontellier each are married, but in love with another person. During the time in which the stories take place it is socially unacceptable for them to divorce or have an affair; and both characters are aware of the views of society. Ethan and Edna are in situations that do not please them, and have an inner need or desire to be with someone else. Ethan Frome falls in love with his young servant, who is also his wife's cousin. Edna ...
    Related: chopin, edith, edith wharton, kate chopin, more successful
  • Heart Of Darkness By Conrad - 1,103 words
    Heart Of Darkness By Conrad Heart of Darkness, written by Joseph Conrad, holds thematically a wide range of references to problems of politics, morality and social order. It was written in a period when European exploitation of Africa was at a gruesome height. Conrad uses double oblique narration. A flame narrator reports the story as told by Marlow, assigned to the command of a river steamboat scheduled to transport an exploring expedition. Kurtz is a first-agent at an important trading post of ivory, located in the interior of the Congo. Both Marlow and Kertz found the reality through their work in Africa. Marlow felt great indignation with people in the sepulchral city after his journey t ...
    Related: conrad, darkness, heart of darkness, joseph conrad, western civilization
  • Ida B Wellsbarnett - 1,522 words
    Ida B. Wells-Barnett IDA B. WELLS-BARNETT Ida B. Wells-Barnett is first among many. She was a civil servant and fought injustices amongst the black community. Ida was born a slave in Holly Springs, Mississippi in 1862. There she witnessed the Civil War and the dramatic changes it brought to her life. During Reconstruction she found possession of previously unheard-of freedoms, her civil rights. The most dramatic change was the institution of schools for the education of blacks. The establishment of the Freedman's Aid Society founded by Shaw University, later renamed Rust College, and was where Ida attended classes. Ida possessed an interest in school, and she quickly worked her way through e ...
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  • Interpretation Of Ibsens A Dolls House - 1,307 words
    Interpretation of Ibsen's "A Doll's House" english interpretation of Ibsen's "A Doll's House" "A Doll's House" is classified under the "second phase" of Henrik Ibsen's career. It was during this period which he made the transition from mythical and historical dramas to plays dealing with social problems. It was the first in a series investigating the tensions of family life. Written during the Victorian era, the controversial play featuring a female protagonist seeking individuality stirred up more controversy than any of his other works. In contrast to many dramas of Scandinavia in that time which depicted the role of women as the comforter, helper, and supporter of man, "A Doll's House" in ...
    Related: a doll's house, dolls house, henrik ibsen, interpretation, real world
  • Johann Sebastian Bach Biography - 1,120 words
    ... accomplished compositions survive. Some of his most famous works include the "Brandenburg Concerto," The "Mass In B Minor," "The Goldberg Variations for Harpsichord," his vast amount of toccatas, especially his "Toccata In F Major," his collection of variations on organ preludes captured in the "Well Tempered Clavier," his immense amount of fugues and chorales including his "Fugue in G minor," major as well as his tremendous amount of chorales, and his Christmas and Easter oratorios, which was another schism in his music genre. Quite frankly, the list goes on and on and on. Surely, Johann Sebastian Bach never believed that his success would become so heroic and monumental. However, we to ...
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