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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: the awakening

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  • Avian Symbolism In The Awakening - 1,142 words
    Avian Symbolism in The Awakening Kate Chopin consistently uses avian symbolism in the novel The Awakening to represent and Enlighten Edna Pontellier. She begins the novel with the image of a caged bird and throughout the story other birds and avian images appear representing freedom, failure, and choices that Edna, the storys main character, must make. Throughout The Awakening Chopin uses flight and descriptions of birds to express the psychological state of mind of her main character, Edna Pontellier. As the story begins we are immediately introduces to the importance of avian symbolism. The first spoken sentences of the novel, are curiously enough, squawked by a parrot rather than a main c ...
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  • Compare The Awakening To Madame Bovary - 1,203 words
    Compare The Awakening to Madame Bovary Kate Chopin's The Awakening and Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary are both tales of women indignant with their domestic situations; the distinct differences between the two books can be found in the authors' unique tones. Both authors weave similar themes into their writings such as, the escape from the monotony of domestic life, dissatisfaction with marital expectations and suicide. References to "fate" abound throughout both works. In The Awakening, Chopin uses fate to represent the expectations of Edna Pontellier's aristocratic society. Flaubert uses "fate" to portray his characters' compulsive methods of dealing with their guilt and rejecting of pers ...
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  • Conventionality Vs Instinct In Daisy Miller And The Awakening - 1,540 words
    Conventionality Vs. Instinct In Daisy Miller And The Awakening. Second Term Essay Henry James's Daisy Miller and Kate Chopin's The Awakening were first published twenty-one years apart, the former in 1878 and the latter in 1899. Despite the gap of more than two decades, however, the two works evince a similarity of thought and intent that is immediately evident in their main themes. Both works display characters whose lives have been governed almost solely by the conventions of their respective societies. Furthermore, both works also attempt to demonstrate to the reader what happens when these conventions are challenged by individual instincts, which more often than not are in direct contrad ...
    Related: awakening, daisy, daisy miller, instinct, miller, the awakening
  • Conventionality Vs Instinct In Daisy Miller And The Awakening - 1,562 words
    ... gin to make themselves felt. She begins to feel an attraction towards Robert Lebrun, and this becomes the catalyst for her internal struggle between conventionality and instinct. It is unthinkable for Edna, a married woman, to become involved with Robert. Her duty is to her husband and children. Her attraction for Robert, however, is too strong to allow her to simply dismiss him. She begins to contemplate the unthinkable, and thus begins the struggle between the conventions of her world and her new-found instincts. Her rebellion against conventionality does not end with her feeling for Robert, however, but spills over into other facets of her life. Thus Robert becomes the means through w ...
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  • Kate Chopins The Awakening - 828 words
    Kate Chopin's The Awakening Many different symbols were utilized in Kate Chopin's The Awakening to illustrate the underlying themes and internal conflict of the characters. One constant and re-emerging symbol is the sea. The voice of the sea is seductive, never ceasing, whispering, clamoring, murmuring, inviting the soul to wander for a spell in abysses of solitude; to lose itself in mazes of inward contemplation. The voice of the sea speaks to the soul. The touch of the sea is sensuous, enfolding the body in its soft, close embrace (25). In the novel, the ocean symbolizes Edna's awakening to a life filled with freedom and independence. On a hot summer evening Robert and Edna go bathing. Alt ...
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  • Kate Chopins The Awakening - 850 words
    Kate Chopin's The Awakening Kate Chopin's Awakening, depicts the life of a woman, Edna, in the early 1900's who revolts against the social status quo and leads the life of an independent female regardless of all the risks. It is a story that unfolds the two parts of her life, only to see them both fall apart. Thus we see the unreasonable conflict between her exterior world, the role of a wife and a mother that society has imposed on her and her interior reality of emotions and sexuality which initially are asleep and awaken through the course of the novel. For the arousal of each aspect, two men are responsible, Robert and Arobin, which correspond to the two sides of her existence. The compl ...
    Related: awakening, kate, kate chopin, the awakening, social status
  • Symbolism In The Awakening - 624 words
    Symbolism In The Awakening The Awakening contains many symbolic features, such as the way Edna uses art, the birds (the parrot and the mockingbird), sleep, music, and the houses Edna Pontellier lives in, but perhaps two of the most significant symbols are the clothes in the novel, not only of Edna, but also the other characters, and the water, whether it be the ocean, the gulf, or the sea. These two symbols are possibly the most significant because of their direct relationship to Edna Pontellier. Both the water and her clothes have the power to not only emphasize, but help show exactly how and what Edna is feeling. Clothes appear to have significant meaning in The Awakening, enough so that t ...
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  • The Awakening - 240 words
    The Awakening This novel takes place in the early 1920's on the Grand Isles of Louisiana. Grande Isle was a resort for wealthy people, to get away from the city. The remainder of the novel takes place in New Orleans. The theme of this book is about women and her "awakening", a sort of liberation. Her "awakening" take place during the summer at the Grand Isle. Edna "awakens" to the intense love and longing that she has not known to exist. She also "awakens" to the knowledge that her husband and children are in control of her life. Mrs. Pontiellier then takes steps forward to release herself from the "cage" she was placed in, in a direct disobedience to her husband Edna begins advancing hersel ...
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  • The Awakening - 296 words
    The Awakening The boundaries which divide Life and Death are at best shadowy and vague. Who shall say where one ends, and where the other begins? Edgar Allan Poe, The Premature Burial (Bartlett, 642). To venture into the world of Edgar Allan Poe is to embark on a journey to a land filled with perversities of the mind, soul, and body. The joyless existence carved out by his writings is one of lost love, mental anguish, and the premature withering of his subjects. Poe wrote in a style that characterized the sufferings he endured throughout in his pitiful life. From the death of his parents while he was still a child, to the repeated frailty of his love life, to the neuroses of his later years, ...
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  • The Awakening - 1,968 words
    The Awakening Carey Coco July 23, 1999 Dr. Jackson English 2070 Kate Chopin and Edna Pontellier as Feminists Kate Chopin is known for her literary works that depict culture in New Orleans, Louisiana, and of women's struggles for freedom. She was born Katherine O'Flaherty in Missouri, and later married Oscar Chopin in 1870. He was a Creole cotton trader from New Orleans. Later they moved to a plantation near Cloutierville, Louisiana, where her husband died in 1882. She returned to Missouri with her six children, and began her writing career. She began writing mostly "local color" stories that earned her consideration as a contributor to Southern regional literature. She later began writing st ...
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  • The Awakening - 747 words
    The Awakening The Awakening Kate Chopin's The Awakening is a work of fiction that tells the story of Edna Pontellier, Southern wife and mother. This book presents the reader with many tough questions and few answers. It is not hard to imagine why this book was banished for decades not long after its initial publication in 1899. At that time in history, women did just what they were expected to do. They were expected to be good daughters, good wives, and good mothers. A woman was expected to move from the protection of her father's roof to the protection of her husband. Edna didn't fit this mold, and that eventually leads her husband to send for a doctor. It is here that Edna Pontellier says ...
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  • The Awakening - 813 words
    The Awakening The Awakening The Awakening, written by Kate Chopin, tells the story of a woman, Edna Pontellier, who undergoes a transformation from an obedient housewife to a person who is alive with strength, character and emotions which she no longer has to repress. This metamorphosis is shaped by her surroundings. Just as her behavior is more shocking and horrifying because of her position in Grand Isle society, it is that very position which causes her to feel restrained and makes her yearn to rebel. Adele Ratignolle is Ednas close friend and confidante. However the two women are nothing alike. Adele is the perfect housewife and mother, and the epitome of what a Creole woman should be. A ...
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  • The Awakening - 1,795 words
    The Awakening The Relationship of The Awakening and Creole Society In The Awakening, Kate Chopin brings out the essence of through the characters of her novel. In this novel Edna Pontellier faces many problems because she is an outcast from society. As a result of her isolation from society she has to learn to fit in and deal with her problems. This situation causes her to go through a series of awakenings that help her find herself, but this also causes problems with her husband because she loses respect for him and the society she lives in. Throughout the novel she is faced with unfavorable circumstances which confuse and eventually kill her. Kate Chopin uses Creole Society in the 1890s as ...
    Related: awakening, the awakening, married women, american society, ministering
  • The Awakening By Kate Chopin - 1,533 words
    The Awakening by Kate Chopin Responsibility and Duty as they Relate to The Awakening Most cultures put heavy emphasis upon responsibility and duty. The culture portrayed in Kate Chopin's book The Awakening visibly reflects a similar emphasis. The main character finds herself wanting to stray from her responsibilities and embrace her intense desire for personal fulfillment. Edna's choice to escape shows two elements: rebellion to the suppression of her adventurous spirit and the lack of "fulfillment" in her relationship. Although she embraces her new found freedoms, she commits suicide at the denouement of the book due to her frustration with the world around her. Many philosophers have dealt ...
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  • The Awakening By Kate Chopin Was Considered Very Shocking When It Was First Published Because Of The Sexual Awakening Of The - 651 words
    The Awakening by Kate Chopin was considered very shocking when it was first published because of the sexual awakening of the main character, Edna Pontellier, and her unconventional behavior. Chopin moved to New Orleans after her marriage and lived there for twelve years until the death of her husband. She returned to St. Louis where she began writing. She used her knowledge of Louisiana and Creole culture to create wonderful descriptions of local color, and she incorporated French phrases used by the Creoles. The Awakening begins at Grade Isle, a vacation spot of wealthy Creoles from New Orleans. Edna is there with her two sons and her husband Leonce who comes and goes because of business. E ...
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  • The Awakening Mademoiselle Reisz: A Pillar Of Moral Support - 540 words
    The Awakening ~ Mademoiselle Reisz: A Pillar Of Moral Support Although Mademoiselle Reisz seems to be relatively insignificant in The Awakening, she has a profound influence on Edna. Mademoiselle Reisz is one of the only characters in the novel who can understand Edna's true character. Reisz inspires Edna to have a courageous soul that dares and defies (63). Mademoiselle Reisz influences Edna by acting like a sanctuary for her. When Edna feels bored, it would be in such a mood that she would hunt up Mademoiselle Reisz (58). When Edna returns to the city, she is compelled to visit Mademoiselle Reisz. When she visits Mademoiselle Reisz, her boredom is lifted away by Reisz's music and Robert's ...
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  • The Awakening The Birds, The Lovers And The Widow - 516 words
    The Awakening - The Birds, The Lovers And The Widow In the novel, The Awakening there are several motifs or images that assist in developing Edna Pontellier in her "awakening", the birds, the lovers and the woman and black all prove to be important parts in this. It is significant that The Awakening opens with two caged birds. Throughout the novel, Edna feels that marriage enslaves her to an identity she for which she is not suited. The parrot is an expensive bird valued for its beauty. The mockingbird is fairly common and plain, and it is valued for the music it provides. These two birds function as metaphors for the position of women in late Victorian society. Women are valued for their ph ...
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  • The Awakening: A Womans Fight For Independence - 832 words
    The Awakening: A Woman's Fight for Independence The Awakening: A Woman's Fight for Independence Right from the beginning the plot is almost conveniently evident. You find a woman, Edna Pontellier, tired of living her life as a pampered and "owned" wife and mother. She is searching for much more in her life, some sort of meaning for her whole existence. She searches for a long time but in the end, the inevitability of her life's pattern and direction wraps around her, suffocating her. She is overcome with wonder, confusion, and guilt for what she believes and what she does to express her beliefs. She finally finds a way to beat the "proper" 1890's lifestyle by committing suicide. During this ...
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  • Austria - 1,042 words
    Austria Austria Austria is the republic in central Europe. It is about 360 miles long and has an area of about 32,378 square miles. Vienna is the countrys capital and largest city. Austria is predominantly a mountainous country, with an average elevation of about 3000 feet. Most of the land falls within the eastern part of the Alps. In general the major mountain ranges of Austria run in an eastern-western direction and are separated from one another by large valleys. The northernmost line of ranges includes the North Tirol Alps and the Salzburg Alps. Among the central range is the Hohe Tauern, which tops in the Grossglockner, the highest elevation in the country. The Pasterze Glacier, one of ...
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  • Awakening - 816 words
    Awakening When faced with the question of "which novel did I have the greatest reaction to this semester?", the first story that came to mind was The Awakening. Although written from the perspective of a woman, I found that this story rendered my greatest emotional appeal. It is a story of a woman, Edna Pontellier, who transforms herself from an obedient housewife to a person who is alive with strength of character and emotions that she no longer has to suppress. The metamorphosis is shaped by her surroundings. It is the narrow minded view of society in Victorian times that makes this story possible. Just as her behavior is more shocking and horrifying because of her position in society, it ...
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