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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: terrifying

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  • 1984 - 661 words
    1984 1984 as an Anti-Utopian Novel A utopia is an ideal or perfect community. While some writers have created fictional places that embody their ideals societies, other writers have written satires that ridicule existing conditions of society, or anti-utopias, which show possible future societies that are anything but ideal. In 1984 , George Orwell presents a terrifying picture of future as life under the constant surveillance of Big Brother. This book 1984 is an anti-utopian novel. The main character Winston Smith lives in the large political country Oceania, which is eternally at war with one of two huge countries, Eurasia and Eastasia. At any moment all existing records show either that O ...
    Related: 1984, love affair, works cited, george orwell, affair
  • 1984 - 719 words
    1984 1) How long do you practice? Where? When? 2) How do you prepare for games? 3) What's the best part of being on the team? 4) How do y'all bond? 5) What do you do during the class? 6) Why did you decide to join the team? 7) What qualifications do you need to meet to be a part of the team? 8) What's your favorite part of the games? 1984 Synopsis Published in 1949, Ninety Eighty-Four is Orwell's terrifing vision of a totalitarian future. Its hero, Winston Smith, is a worker at the Ministry of Truth, where he falsifies records for the party. Secretly subversive, he and his colleague Julia try to free themselves from political slavery but the price of freedom is betrayal. Reviews Outside, eve ...
    Related: 1984, winston smith, big brother, love affair, encyclopedia
  • The Question Of Being: What It Is, Why It Matters - 1,317 words
    "The Question Of Being": What It Is, Why It Matters. Martin Heidegger attempts to answer the "question of Being" by appealing to the terminology and methodology of Dasein, most commonly defined as existence. Dasein is not simply any kind of existence, however, but an existence that is unique from all other existences in that it asks the question of existence while existing in the existence itself. In other words, one must first understand Dasein in order to understand Being because Dasein is a kind of being that is concerned about its very Being. Contrary to the popular opinion that in order to truly and clearly comprehend any phenomenon, the subject which interrogates must necessarily stand ...
    Related: thomas aquinas, martin heidegger, true meaning, reflective, disclosure
  • Alcoholosm - 1,240 words
    Alcoholosm Within the context of our society, drinking of alcohol is a perfectly normal activity. For most people drinking a moderate amount of alcohol can be beneficial, indeed studies suggest that moderate drinking may protect against coronary heart disease by improving insulin resistance (Gold, 1991). However, for a minority of people drinking alcohol is an activity that is fraught with danger and, for a very few, is akin to taking a poison that will almost inevitably ruin their lives. Henceforth, it is important for research purposes to define who an alcoholic is and what the effects of alcohol on that person are. An alcoholic is a person who drinks excessive amounts of alcohol habituall ...
    Related: personality type, severe mental, contributing factor, personality, drinking
  • Alfred Hitchcock - 1,554 words
    ... pathy for a peeping Tom killer in his forties (the age of the murderer in Bloch's novel), the director proposed using a much younger character and even suggested to the writer that Perkins get the lead role(Rebello 111). When Hitchcock began production on PSYCHO, he was told that he would have to use the facilities at Revue Studios, the television division of Universal Studios, which Paramount had rented for the making of the film(Rebello 112). Although he was unable to use his regular cinematographer, Robert Burks, Hitchcock managed to convince Paramount that his special editor, George Tomasini, should be included in the production(Rebello 110). The director's desire for detail was in f ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, hitchcock, dressing room, high school
  • Alice In Wonderland - 1,801 words
    Alice In Wonderland Finding the Child in Us All Lewis Carroll's classic Alice's Adventures in Wonderland has entertained not only children but adults for over one hundred years. The tale has become a treasure of philosophers, literary critics, psychoanalysts, and linguists. It also has attracted Carroll's fellow mathematicians and logicians. There appears to be something in Alice for everyone, and there are almost as many explanations of the work as there are commentators. It may be perhaps Carroll's fantastical style of writing that entertains the reader, rather than teaching them a lesson as was customary in his time. Heavy literary symbolism is difficult to trace through his works because ...
    Related: alice, alice in wonderland, wonderland, nineteenth century, young adult
  • Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy - 1,760 words
    Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri (1265 - 1321) Type of Work: Allegorical religious poem Setting Hell, Purgatory and Paradise; A.D. 1300 Principal Characters Dante, the Pilgrim Virgil, the Poet, and Dante's guide Beatrice, Dante's womanly ideal and religious inspiration Story Overview Prologue: Dante, realizing he has strayed from the "true way,. into worldliness, tells of a vision where he travels through all the levels of Hell, up the mount of Purgatory, and finally through the realms of Paradise, where he is allowed a brief glimpse of God. The traveler sets out on the night before Good Friday, and finds himself in the middle of a dark wood. There he e ...
    Related: comedy, dante, dante alighieri, divine, divine comedy
  • All Quiet On The Western Front - 327 words
    All Quiet on the Western Front All Quiet on the Western Front is by Erich Maria Remarque. This book was an extraordinary war story. Remarque uses excellent words and phrases to describe crucial details of the book. Remarque had first hand experience because he was a German in World War I. So he expresses his opinions through Paul the main character of the book. One of the strongest themes in this book is that war makes man inhuman. From the author's point of view soldiers was often compared to various nonliving objects that were inhuman. The soldiers are compared to coins of different provinces that are melted down and now they bear the same stamp(236). Remarque thinks that the soldiers mind ...
    Related: all quiet on the western front, quiet, world war i, erich maria, terrifying
  • American Gothic: The Dark Side Of Individualism - 429 words
    American Gothic: The Dark Side of Individualism After the real horrors of the Civil War, the popularity of Gothic writing dramatically decreased in the United States. The Romantic Movement that had spawned the Gothic tradition was replaced by realism. It was until the twentieth century that the Gothic tradition was revitalization. The revitalization of the Gothic spirit was particularly felt in the American South. Modern Southern writers including William Faulkner, Carson McCullers, Truman Capote, and Flannery O'Connor made Southern Gothic unique and attracting to readers. These writers were often grouped together in the Southern Gothic tradition because of the gloom and pessimism of their f ...
    Related: american, dark side, individualism, nathaniel hawthorne, carson mccullers
  • Anorexia - 1,543 words
    Anorexia It would seem today that eating disorders are on the rise. While this may be true, the numbers may appear to grow only because more cases are being brought out into the open. One interpretation of an eating disorder is termed as a relationship between the person and food that appears abnormal. Anorexia Nervosa is one of the most prevalent eating disorder diseases. The word Anorexia itself means, "lack of appetite," and as for the definition of Anorexia, Anorexia is an all encompassing pursuit of thinness, occurring most often in adolescents and young adult women. This is accomplished by avoidance of eating by any means possible. The person affected by Anorexia has an absolutely terr ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, blood pressure, fashion industry, relief
  • Antisemitism In The United States - 392 words
    Anti-Semitism in the United States 'The more things change, the more they stay the same'. This clich has been used millions of times and never has it been more fitting than in this situation. The Holocaust was supposed to be a wake up call for the world, to let all nations know that racism and hatred must be abolished or at least contained in order for peace to exist. It seems that in this country, a nation founded on the principles of equality and freedom, the lessons of the Holocaust are being ignored. If you were to search the Internet and type in the phrase 'white supremacy' or 'Nazi', without a doubt you would find hundreds of organizations throughout the United States who still preach ...
    Related: antisemitism, hate crime, adolf hitler, white supremacy, semitic
  • Atomic - 2,186 words
    ... re were no smells. There was no movement. Every step I took made a gravelly squeak in blue-white frost. And every squeak was echoed loudly. The season of locking was over. The Earth was locked up tight (179).This description eerily resembles what many have said the Earth will look like during a nuclear winter (Stone, 62). In addition to Dr. Hoenikker and his doomsday games, Vonnegut provides an interesting analysis of atomic age society with the Bokonon religion. This religion, completely made up by Vonnegut and used in this novel, is the religion of every single inhabitant of San Lorenzo, the books imaginary banana republic. This is the island where Jonah eventually ends up, and where t ...
    Related: atomic, atomic bomb, collected poems, nuclear waste, ripper
  • Auschwitz - 1,053 words
    Auschwitz Auschwitz How could all this have happened? This is one of the many questions associated with the Holocaust. The Third Reich of no doubt on of the worlds largest and most feared empires. It could have easily overthrown the Roman Empire and was the most worthy adversary of the British Empire. The most overwhelming and terrifying aspect of the Second World War has got to be the ghettos, concentration camps and of course the death camps. The camp that stands out in everybodys mind has got to be Auschwitz. Out of the 6.8 million killed there were 6000 killed at Auschwitz a day. What some people may not know is that Auschwitz was actually three camps fused into one. The most potent and ...
    Related: auschwitz, auschwitz concentration camp, second world, concentration camp, incarcerated
  • Auschwitzthe Toture Camps - 1,134 words
    Auschwitz-The Toture Camps Auschwitz, located thirty-seven miles west of Krakow, was the first concentration camp where Jewish people worked to death, or were automatically killed. This camp, compared to all the other camps, tortured the most people. At the camp there was a place called the Black Wall, this was where the people were executed. In March of 1941, there was another camp that started its building. This second camp was called Auschwitz II, or Birkenau. It was located 1.9 miles away from Auschwitz I. In the town Monowitz, another camp was being built. This camp was called Auschwitz III, or Buna-Monowitz. Other camps that were located close to Monowitz were moved to Buna-Monowitz. P ...
    Related: concentration camp, concentration camps, jewish people, spring break, train
  • Battle Royale - 893 words
    Battle Royale In "Battle Royal," Ellison uses details of setting to create the mood of horror and repulsion. The horror begins when the narrator listens to a conversation between his father and grandfather, as his grandfather lay on his death bed. "Son, after I'm gone I want you to keep up the good fight. I never told you, but our life is a war and I have been a traitor all my born days, a spy in the enemy's country ever since I give up my gun back in the Reconstruction. Live with your head in the lion's mouth. I want you to overcome 'em with yeses, undermine 'em with grins, agree 'em to death and destruction, let 'em swoller you till they vomit or bust wide open" (256). This statement had a ...
    Related: battle royal, royale, the narrator, upper class, lying
  • Bell Jar By Sylvia Plath Evaluation - 1,967 words
    Bell Jar By Sylvia Plath Evaluation Integrated into the story of The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath is a "case history" of a depression patient, from it's subtle beginnings to it's terrifying consequences to it's shaky resolution. On the subject of this depression, there is an article written by William Styron which, in the course of describing his own dealings with the disease, he compares it to cancer. It is my own firm opinion that this assertion is perfectly valid, and it can be shown through careful analysis of the causes and effects of both depression and cancer that this is so. In addition, using The Bell Jar as an example of a case of depression, we will see how this comparison makes clear ...
    Related: bell, bell jar, evaluation, plath, sylvia, sylvia plath, the bell jar
  • Ben Franklin Biographycritique - 1,615 words
    ... del for the national character. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts on Jan. 17, 1706, into a religious Puritan household. His father, Josiah, was a candlemaker and a skillful mechanic. His mother, Abiah Bens parents raised thirteen children--the survivors of Josiahs seventeen children by two wives (#1). Printer & Writer Franklin left school at ten years old when he was pressed into his father's trade. At twelve Ben was apprenticed to his half brother James, a printer of The New England Courant. He generally absorbed the values and philosophy of the English Enlightenment. At the age of 16, Franklin wrote some pieces for the Courant signed Silence Dogood, in which he parodied the Boston a ...
    Related: benjamin franklin, franklin, franklin stove, stamp act, articles of confederation
  • Book Report: After The Bomb - 732 words
    Book Report: After The Bomb After the Bomb, written by Gloria Miklowitz, is a thrilling novel that takes place before, during, and after a bomb, which supposedly was sent from Russia by accident. The disastrous happening alters all of Los Angeles and surrounding cities. Philip Singer, a teenager, is in a position as leader of the family. His brother, Matt, is awfully sick, possibly from radiation, his father was away at work during the blast and for all Philip knows he might be dead, and his mother was badly injured and needs immediate attention. Hospitals are flooded with injured and dying people and the government doesn't send help for a few days. The badly injured don't even get the chanc ...
    Related: bomb, book report, los angeles, angeles area, girlfriend
  • Books Wuthering Heights - 930 words
    Books- Wuthering Heights An author's particular style and technique, is usually greatly attributed to their personality and individual preference. In the case of Emily Bronte, she was an extremely withdrawn and private person; and it is because of this, why she turned to books as a form of expression. In her notorious Wuthering Heights, she uses books as an important way to illustrate a number of key issues; most notably character, and the theme of love. Although subtle in her method, Bronte passion is what she employs as a tool in the construction of the epic tale. In the novel Wuthering Heights, the first time we are given reference to books is during chapter 3, prior to Lockwood's nightma ...
    Related: wuthering, wuthering heights, reading aloud, human race, solely
  • Bryant Vs Dickinson - 1,367 words
    Bryant Vs Dickinson Emily Dickinson presents death in the poem "Because I Could Not Stop for Death" through the use of personification and the use of extended metaphor. William Cullen Bryant presents death through the use of the analogies in the poem "Thanatopsis." Although each poet presents death differently, the meanings are similar. In "Thanatopsis, " Bryant influences the reader to accept death as all living things' fate. Bryant explains death by nature's laws and the fact that nature's creatures must abide by these laws. In lines 26-28, Bryant explains how an individual must abide by these laws and surrender to the earth that nourished the living. "To be a brother to the insensible roc ...
    Related: bryant, cullen bryant, dickinson, emily dickinson, william cullen bryant
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