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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: taboo

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  • Taboo Of Miscegeny In Othello - 1,086 words
    Taboo Of Miscegeny In Othello Racism in Othello Choose one non-dramatic text offered on the module, (an extract from Samuel Taylor Coleridge's Literary Remains,) and show how it might help us understand Othello. The extract presents a sustained attack by Coleridge on Shakespeare for his lack of realism in the 'monstrous' depiction of a marriage between a 'beautiful Venetian girl,' and a 'veritable negro,' in Othello. He sees Shakespeare's transformation of a 'barbarous negro' into a respected soldier and nobleman of stature as 'ignorant', since at the time, 'negroes were not known except as slaves.' (Appendix) The extract seems to raise two questions - how central is the taboo of miscegeny t ...
    Related: othello, taboo, the duke, samuel taylor coleridge, sufficient
  • Taboo Of Miscegeny In Othello - 1,094 words
    ... rabantio's reaction to his daughter's elopement, and this is extremely significant. Othello has hitherto been treated with great reverence in Venetian society, but Shakespeare creates a moment of crisis to examine the extent to which Othello's reputation defines him when he needs it most. As long as logic exists, there will be little space for prejudice, which is based on illogical and irrational 'gut' feelings, but Iago works by removing logic, his crudity and base animal imagery brings out the primal side of others. Sadly, he shows how easily this can be achieved through a moment of crisis and a few choice words. Act 1almost presents the play in miniature; Iago goes on to bigger and be ...
    Related: moor othello, othello, taboo, different types, slave trade
  • Totem And Taboo - 1,709 words
    Totem And Taboo In Totem and Taboo, Freud Sigmund explain the origin of religion of different tribe found around the world. Although related, the two words have quite distinct meanings. According to Comptons Encyclopedia, "totemism is a term of Ojibwa American Indian origin that refers to an animal or plant associated either with a group of blood-related persons such as a family or with part of a tribe". The plant or animal is a totem. As such, totemism is a word used to define relationships. A taboo implies something forbidden or to be avoided. The term is of Polynesian origin. It was first recorded by explorer James Cook in 1771, when he found it used by the natives of the Tonga Islands in ...
    Related: taboo, totem, mother in law, south pacific, shake
  • Totem And Taboo - 1,697 words
    ... desires of others and awakening the ambivalent conflict in them." It is clear that the violation of certain taboo becomes a social danger that must be punished by all the members of society. If they did not punish the violator, they would therefore become aware that they want to imitate evil. Among these races, taboo has become the general form of law imposed by chiefs and priests to insure their property and privileges. Freud explains theyre still remains a large group of laws related to enemies, chiefs, and the dead. First, lets talk about enemies. The punishment when you kill an enemy is different in every tribe. For example, in Timor the leader of the expedition cannot return to his ...
    Related: taboo, totem, oedipus complex, south american, naturally
  • 1960s - 413 words
    1960S The 1960s were the age of "sex, drugs, and rock-n-roll." People had a new outlook to life. Women began wearing shorts, skirts, and clothing they normally did not wear. Almost anything was permissive. There was a full-scale sexual revolution. Decriminalization of homosexuality was prevalent and sex education was now allowed to be taught in schools. By taking the mystery out of sex (by learning about it), it will not be detrimental to society. Television shows also started including sex in hopes of lowering STDs and the birth rate. In 1963, birth control was developed and was known as "Katy bar the door." In the early 1960s, movies, books, and plays took on taboo subjects that intrigued ...
    Related: legalized prostitution, martin luther, sex education, premarital, television
  • African American Culture - 957 words
    African American Culture African American Culture Culture is not a fixed phenomenon, nor is it the same in all places or to all people. It is relative to time, place, and particular people. Learning about other people can help us to understand ourselves and to be better world citizens. One of the most common ways of studying culture is to focus on the differences within and among cultures. Although their specifics may vary form one culture to another, sociologists refer to those elements or characteristics that can be found in every know society as cultural universals. For example, in all societies, funeral rites include expression of grief, disposing of the dead, and rituals that define the ...
    Related: african, african american, african american culture, african art, american, american community, american culture
  • America Land Of The Free And Home Of The Brave The Utopian Society Which Every European Citizen Desired To Be A Part Of In Th - 3,033 words
    America... land of the free and home of the brave; the utopian society which every European citizen desired to be a part of in the 18th and 19th centuries. The revolutionary ideas of The Age of Enlightenment such as democracy and universal male suffrage were finally becoming a reality to the philosophers and scholars that so elegantly dreamt of them. America was a playground for the ideas of these enlightened men. To Europeans, and the world for that matter, America had become a kind of mirage, an idealistic version of society, a place of open opportunities. Where else on earth could a man like J. D. Rockefeller rise from the streets to one of the richest men of his time? America stood for i ...
    Related: america, brave, century america, citizen, southern society, utopian, utopian society
  • Analysis And Assessment Of Baumgartner Jones Agendas And Instability In American Politics - 1,448 words
    Analysis And Assessment Of Baumgartner & Jones Agendas And Instability In American Politics I find a certain amount of difficulty when I attempt to offer an assessment of Baumgartner and Jones work, Agendas and Instability in American Politics. The reason for this is because the book is written in such a manner that it is enormously difficult to offer a conflicting argument to the model they use to describe how issues become part of agenda, the power of interest groups, policy monopolies, how power shifts, and other issues related to the aforementioned. For this reason, I must say that I find their model to be on solid ground. The previous reading assignments in this course which where mostl ...
    Related: american, american association, american congress, american political, american politics, american public, american system
  • Applied Nostalgia - 2,252 words
    ... an apocalypse not. The 1950s and the 1990s are utterly and completely different. The 1950s was a post-war time, where utterly irreproducible affects kept mom at home. The 1990s is a technology laden information society, where media pries into corners and brings problems into greater light including violence, rape, birth control, and AIDS. The amount of nuclear families decreased (Two 1), yet the cause for the dissolve of the family outweighs the difficulties, the equalization of women in the work force. No longer do mothers rely on the male's income, they can survive on their own. Their ties of help flutter free and the American women becomes free since the American ideals put forth in ...
    Related: sexual education, single parent, employee loyalty, educating, guide
  • Avian Symbolism In The Awakening - 1,142 words
    Avian Symbolism in The Awakening Kate Chopin consistently uses avian symbolism in the novel The Awakening to represent and Enlighten Edna Pontellier. She begins the novel with the image of a caged bird and throughout the story other birds and avian images appear representing freedom, failure, and choices that Edna, the storys main character, must make. Throughout The Awakening Chopin uses flight and descriptions of birds to express the psychological state of mind of her main character, Edna Pontellier. As the story begins we are immediately introduces to the importance of avian symbolism. The first spoken sentences of the novel, are curiously enough, squawked by a parrot rather than a main c ...
    Related: avian, awakening, symbolism, the awakening, free will
  • Beautiful Life - 1,227 words
    Beautiful Life We go AIDS unit now. These words were spoken in fragmented English by a tiny Thai woman dressed in a crisp white nurses uniform, complete with a stiff little hat perched on top of her overly styled black hair, teased and sprayed to perfection. I looked down at the nurse, somewhat startled. I certainly had not expected to be permitted to see into the gruesome reality of taboo Thai culture. I had come to Lampang, Northern Thailand with nine other American students on my first of several community service programs to the country. By the time we reached the Kanyalyani hospital, we had already experienced our fair share of encounters with the peculiarities of the Thai people and t ...
    Related: black hair, make sense, community service, contagious, online
  • Carol Anne Duffys Adultery - 1,091 words
    Carol Anne Duffy's Adultery FORM AND STRUCTURE Carol Anne Duffy's poem "Adultery" is structured in a traditional and straightforward way. It is comprised of eleven verses - each with the common four lines, which consist of between four and nine words. This makes the poem not particularly striking at the first look, before it is read. The typography does not attract the readers attention, this is probably because Duffy wants the reader to concentrate on the language, and is not concerned with the shape that the lines form, or how they relate to the themes of the poem. RHYME AND RHYTHM Duffy does not seem particularly interested in rhyme in this poem, and probably decided before writing it tha ...
    Related: adultery, anne, carol, second half, excuse
  • Carol Anne Duffys Adultery - 1,097 words
    ... n, than her own, especially when she has focused on what the characters are thinking in the rest of the poem. Altogether, Duffy is revealing some of the emotions involved with adultery. There is also the matter of whether the adulterer is male or female. "Bastard" is traditionally an insult towards men, and it is unlikely that Duffy would purposely confuse the reader in regard to the gender of the main character, especially when their actions and thoughts are so vital to the poem. This does not necessarily mean that the adulterer is male. The references earlier to oral sex implied that the adulterer was female, but I could be wrong about those, or maybe Duffy is saying that person the ad ...
    Related: adultery, anne, carol, main character, english language
  • Chinese Prostitutes In 1900s - 1,248 words
    Chinese Prostitutes In 1900'S In California, between 1850's to the Chinese Exclusion Act, most of the Chinese women who came to San Francisco were either slaves or indentured. They were often lured, kidnapped or purchased and forced to work as prostitutes at the brothels which is run by secret society of the Tongs of San Francisco. Chinese prostitutes also were smuggled and had worked at the Chinatown brothels in the Comstock Mines in Nevada. Chinese prostitutes were commonly known as prostitutes of the lowest order. "Both outcast slatterns and Asian slaves stood at the edge of the irregular marketplace, far more socially stigmatized than ordinary prostitutes." The demand for Chinese prostit ...
    Related: chinese, chinese exclusion, chinese exclusion act, chinese women, spanish-american war
  • Cohabitation - 636 words
    Cohabitation The process of an unmarried couple living together is known as cohabitation. In earlier years this was a form of taboo, it was a cause of great concern and morality among most people. To live together before marriage meant that you were having premarital sex, which was the greatest area of concern in this moral debate. In 1968 Linda Leclair's (a student at Columbia University) enrollment was questioned when she moved into her boyfriend's apartment. The college allowed her to continue her education and Columbia, but with several restrictions as a consequence of her actions. (Myers, 1998) This is just one example of how the public viewed this radical new look on relationships. By ...
    Related: cohabitation, changing times, before marriage, columbia university, canada
  • Comparison Of Margaret Meads Coming In Age To Russian Youth - 1,277 words
    Comparison of Margaret Mead's "Coming in Age" to Russian Youth In an attempt to challenge societal values, youth cultures, in the form of rebellion, act and dress radically and form groups in protest. These dissident actions against the structure of existing society promotes the beginning of new small groups which reflect their own rules, structures, class, gender and ethnic ideologies. So, the youth culture, in challenging societal values, at the same time is reflecting them. In comparing Margaret Mead's young adults in Coming of Age in Samoa to Russian youth it is evident where the differences arise. The Samoans strong cultural values leave little need for individual expression. Expectatio ...
    Related: comparison, margaret, margaret mead, russian, youth culture
  • Conceptions Of Divorce - 1,162 words
    ... inues her argument by following with, Prevention is the best solution to any problem. While an educational program can't prevent all divorce, it does lay the groundwork for stronger unions. Families educated about problem-solving skills have a better chance for successful relationships. Ager has a different view. She says, Human relationships are fragile and prone to disease. Not all marriages deserve to be saved, and I'd argue that divorce has redeemed more human spirits than it has doomed. She then goes on to ask: ....what about encouraging women to become financially self-sufficient before they become mothers? What about keeping better track of dead-beat dads? What about government-fi ...
    Related: divorce, marriage counseling, mayfield publishing company, current issues, forgiveness
  • Crystal Barrey - 1,429 words
    ... fective writing about topics he is familiar with. Poe is the poster child of Ernest Hemmingways philosophy: "Only write about what you know, and then dont write too damn much." Another theme that frequents Poes literature, is the presence of a female. She is generally portrayed sympathetically and for the most part is dead, or dies in the course of the story. Ive already mentioned the "Black Cat", which features a young wife brutally murdered by her husband. "Murders in the Rue Morge" and "The Mystery of Marie Roget" were two detective style stories that featured women being killed. Yet, there can be no better example of Poes women issues as well as his own mental instability than in a s ...
    Related: crystal, william henry, cask of amontillado, francis bacon, tale
  • Cyber Porn - 1,569 words
    ... our economy can not say no to (Rosen 15). "There are means of controlling material that parents do not want their kids to view (Levy 21)." Several devises already exist for parents that will help them filter out what they do not want their children to see. Surfwatch, a software package, allows parents to have a list of forbidden sites that can not be reached. It also always parents to program it to watch for any kind of obscene language (Miller and Mauro 85). PICS are rating and filtering technology. Parents or a third party can set up a self-censor program to their values for any document online that is PICS compatible. This always each household to censor out information found to be of ...
    Related: cyber, porn, supreme court, constitutional rights, parent
  • Debate: Talk Shows - 872 words
    Debate: Talk Shows Chrsitine Tirman Talk About Talk Shows In the world of television, talk shows have undoubtedly taken up almost every inch of space on daytime television, and while doing so has caused much controversy. In the nineteen eighties, soap operas and game shows ruled the daytime airwaves, but the nineties are definitely the decade of the talk shows. The craze of talk shows all seemed to start with the originals such as Geraldo Riveria, Donahue and Sally Jesse Rafael (now called Sally) In fact, many of their original topics are still being used in todays talk shows, but with a different style and format. Some of the talk shows on the air today, such as the Oprah Winfrey Show and t ...
    Related: talk shows, winfrey show, quality of life, soap operas, adultery
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